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LACo works with healthcare facilities to ensure booster access


LOS ANGELES (CNS) – With booster doses of COVID-19 vaccines now available, Los Angeles County health officials said on Wednesday they were working closely with qualified nursing facilities to ensure that residents have access to additional injections.

According to the county public health department, qualified nursing facilities will be asked weekly about their strategies for making boosters available to residents. Department officials said they would work to overcome “any barriers to requesting, receiving and administering reminders,” and will deploy mobile vaccination clinics to all facilities in need of assistance.


What would you like to know

  • LA County health officials said on Wednesday they were working closely with qualified nursing facilities to ensure residents have access to additional injections
  • According to the county public health department, qualified nursing facilities will be asked weekly about their strategies for making boosters available to residents.
  • According to the county, 95% of staff in skilled nursing facilities are fully immunized, along with 88% of residents
  • The county reported 11 new deaths from COVID-19 and 909 more cases on Wednesday

“We continue to work with trained nursing facilities across the county to ensure these vulnerable residents have good access to booster doses as soon as possible,” County Public Health Director Barbara Ferrer said in a statement. “We urge others eligible for booster doses, especially those at higher risk of serious illness if infected, to take advantage of the enhanced protection provided by the booster, especially before holiday gatherings that create more opportunities for the spread of COVID-19. “

According to the county, 95% of staff in skilled nursing facilities are fully immunized, as are 88% of residents. All staff should be vaccinated, but those with approved exemptions should be tested up to twice a week.

Under federal guidelines, COVID-19 vaccine boosters are available for people: – 65 years of age or older; – aged 18 and over and living in long-term care facilities; – aged 18 and over with underlying medical conditions; and – aged 18 and over and living or working in high risk environments.

Under federal guidelines, people can be given a different recall mark than their original doses. People who have received Pfizer or Moderna injections in two doses should not receive a booster until at least six months after their last dose. For the single injection Johnson & Johnson vaccine, people should wait at least two months after their injection.

According to figures released last week, 79% of eligible county residents aged 12 and older have received at least one dose of the vaccine and 71% are fully immunized.

The county reported 11 new deaths from COVID-19 on Wednesday, bringing the total death toll to 26,578. Another 909 cases were also reported, bringing the cumulative total for the entire pandemic to 1,487,502.

The mobile average daily rate of people testing positive for the virus was 1.2% on Wednesday.

According to state figures, there were 649 COVID-positive patients in county hospitals on Wednesday, down slightly from Tuesday’s 650. Of those patients, 183 were in intensive care, up from 179 a day earlier.


Some families have questions about the bill for retirement home cameras

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CLEVELAND, Ohio (WOIO) – A new proposal could help keep an extra eye on your loved ones in nursing homes.

Senate Bill 58, called Esther’s Law, would allow families to install cameras in residents’ rooms.

But 19 investigations have found that some families are against the state bill as it is written and have questions about it.

It’s been a long struggle to get the bill this far for Steve Piskor.

A hidden camera captured a shocking video of her mother Esther’s abuse at a northeast Ohio nursing home in 2009.

The evidence sent several of the aides to jail.

Since then, Piskor has been pushing for cameras to be allowed inside nursing homes.

“Without the camera, I wouldn’t have known the abuse was happening as much as it was,” Steve Piskor said in an interview with 19 Investigates in May 2021.

He said the pandemic made this need even more urgent.

Esther’s law was already passed by the Ohio Senate earlier this year.

Nursing home residents and their families could choose whether or not to install the cameras.

Phofina Wade, member of the local non-profit association Advocates for the Elderly, supports the idea.

Her brother Titus lives in a retirement home in Cleveland.

“If you are in the facility, you have the right to receive the care you need. And having a camera bill or law would give families the peace of mind that they can watch their loved ones, ”Wade said.

But she is worried about one thing she says is missing from the state bill – a standard form used in all facilities, allowing for the installation of cameras.

“It should be standard so everyone knows what the rules are and there are no gray areas,” Wade said.

19 Investigations found that this was previously addressed in the bill, but was amended, leaving the details of the form to the institution.

“There could be so many things wrong with that because it’s open to interpretation of everything.

The establishments could say one thing, the family could say one thing, whereas if they are on the same wavelength with the state, everyone would know what the rules are, ”she said.

Wade said she would like to see the state health department or the Ohio Health Care Association create a standard form for each nursing home in the state to use with regards to cameras.

“There’s no point having a law on the books for this if it’s not done right,” she said.

“Not everyone can do what they want. We have to have standards for everything, and it looks like we have them for everything else except nursing homes, ”Wade said.

Nursing homes may display a sign alerting employees and guests that a camera is being used in the resident’s room.

If someone tampers with one of the cameras, it would be a crime.

We reached out to State Senator Nickie Antonio (D-Lakewood), she sponsored the bill.

“This bill serves as a first step in protecting our most vulnerable Ohioans living in nursing homes by allowing loved ones to place a camera in their bedroom. We have worked hard to ensure that the law is permissive and not mandatory. The forms mentioned in the bill simply serve as documentation for the institution’s files, ”Senator Antonio said in an email.

Regarding the questions on the forms, she replied:

“Once the bill is passed, we can sort out any issues that arise later,” said Antonio.

Copyright 2021 WOIO. All rights reserved.


Maryland Congressional delegation thanks healthcare workers


October 27, 2021

US Senators Chris Van Hollen and Ben Cardin and Congressmen Steny H. Hoyer, Dutch Ruppersberger, John Sarbanes, Kweisi Mfume, Anthony G. Brown, Jamie B. Raskin and David Trone (all D-Md.) Released an video thanking healthcare workers in Maryland and across America for their service during the COVID-19 pandemic.

More than 20 million people work in the health care industry in the United States, including health technicians, practitioners, physicians, surgeons, registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, home helpers and personal care assistants, pharmacists, and other health and social service officials. assistance sector, the largest employer in the country.

The once-in-a-century COVID-19 pandemic has hit our healthcare system hard, disrupting care in ways we were not prepared for. Healthcare workers did not have sufficient access to personal protective equipment (PPE) and continued to courageously provide care while facing considerable risk on the front lines during the pandemic. Despite the precautions, health workers accounted for about 7-26% of COVID-19 cases in all states. In April, it was reported that more than 3,600 health workers had died from the virus. So many people risk their lives to treat, care for and keep our communities safe.

Healthcare workers have treated nearly 225,000 COVID-19 hospital patients, fighting tooth and nail to save the lives of our loved ones. They worked long shifts and worked several days in a row without a break. Helping to immunize millions of people nationwide, health workers continue to treat patients as Delta variant devastatess our country.

“We cannot thank our health heroes enough. They were our heroes before the pandemic, and that’s especially true now. They made the difference. Please join Team Maryland and thank the health heroes who have made a difference in your life ”, said lawmakers.

The full video is available here.



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Tears of joy as lovers reunite in nursing home after 100 days apart

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After 100 days apart due to restrictions and their own recoveries, George and Joyce Bell, 89 and 87 respectively, were reunited at the care home last week

At the couple’s reunion, George told his wife he would never leave [her] again for the rest of his life ‘

An elderly married couple shed tears after being reunited in a nursing home, after 100 days apart due to restrictions and health concerns.

George and Joyce Bell were admitted to hospital separately due to health concerns, before going to Tollesby Hall Care Home, Middlesbrough, to recover.

After 100 days apart due to restrictions and their own recoveries, the couple were reunited at the care home last week.

Talk to Teesside Live, Joyce said, “I can’t tell you how nice it was. I told him that I would always be there for him no matter what. ”

“He hugged me tight and said he would never leave me for the rest of his life.”

Joyce, now 87, and George, 89, grew up in Middlesbrough and lived next door to each other.








George and Joyce were married 66 years ago when she was 21 and he was 23
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Picture:

Tollesby Hall Nursing Home)




“My mom called him ‘The Big Idiot on the Motorcycle’,” Joyce said.

“I admired him from afar. He made everyone call him George, he didn’t like Mr. Bell, he didn’t like stories.

George always played tricks on people, she said, but went out of his way to help anyone he could.

They married 66 years ago, when Joyce was 21 and George 23 at the old St Cuthbert Church on Newport Road – which is no longer there.

Asked about the secret to a long marriage, Joyce said, “Let them make their own way.”

She also said that sometimes you have to “put your foot down”.

“You have to do it, with George,” she added.

After his national service early in their marriage, George was an electrician, an armature winder, whom he loved, and he made life-size engine models as a hobby.

Joyce worked as a mobile window dresser and toured all the major towns in the region to create the storefronts.

When she turned 65, she didn’t want to retire because she loved him so much.








The couple were reunited at Tollesby Hall Care Home
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Picture:

Tollesby Hall Nursing Home)




For their Ruby wedding anniversary, George bought Joyce a beautiful ring that she will always cherish.

Before being admitted to James Cook University Hospital in Middlesbrough in June, they lived in a bungalow in Marton.

“I made him make a promise to me,” Joyce said. “I told him that if he ends up going into a house, I won’t go into one.”

But now that they are in the nursing home to recuperate, the couple are both happy with the way they are being looked after.

Joyce is recovering well from her broken hip and the staff take her downstairs to visit George every day.

Rachel White, from activities at Tollesby Hall Care Home, said: “With the support of the team here in Tollesby, we have been able to reunite George and his wife again.




“When Joyce arrived here at Tollesby Hall, we said her husband would come soon after.

“She was so excited and nervous she couldn’t sleep she told the staff she felt like a young girl again.

“It was very emotional when we first brought them together, not just for them but for the whole team here in Tollesby who look after them.

“It was such a heartwarming time to be a part and moved many of us to tears.

“With the support of the team here in Tollesby, we are looking to bring them back to their home where they can return to their lives together to continue their fairy tale.”


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Expenditure Ratio Requirements for Nursing Facilities and Other New Jersey Regulatory Developments


Adoption of new ratio requirements for nursing facilities

On September 14, 2021, the Medical Assistance and Health Services Division adopted new rules codified under NJAC 10: 49A. NJAC 10: 49A applies to facility patient care ratio (“PCR”) requirements and establishes expense reporting and reimbursement requirements for nursing facilities that serve Medicaid recipients / NJ FamilyCare.

Under these new rules, care facilities will pay a rebate to the Department of Social Services in the event that less than 90 percent of the income received from the Department of Social Services and its contracted managed care organizations is used for care. of the individual of the entity. beneficiaries. The first reporting period to calculate the reimbursement will be in fiscal year 2022.

It should be noted that under this new rule, establishments must submit their PCR report no later than the first day of the sixth month following the end of the applicable reporting year. Individuals who own more than one facility must submit separate reports for each facility operated during the reporting year of the PCR. Likewise, facility owners who purchase another facility, or transfer ownership of another facility, during a PCR reporting year are required to submit information and reports for their newly acquired facilities, including for parts of the PCR reporting year that were prior to their acquisition of the facility.

Continuous quality improvement program proposed for pharmacies

The New Jersey State Board of Pharmacy is propose a new rule under NJAC 13: 39-1.9 to require each registered pharmacy licensee and responsible pharmacist to implement a continuous quality improvement (“CQI”) program to improve detection, identification and prevention of prescribing errors.

The proposed rule establishes the Board’s requirement for each registered pharmacy licensee and responsible pharmacist to implement ACQ and further sets out the requirements of the pharmacy policies and procedures manual with respect to ACQ. This proposed rule further provides that every licensee, registrant and permit holder has a duty to cooperate in any investigation, inspection or investigation by the Commission.

The comment period for the proposed rule ends on November 19, 2021.

Rules of reciprocity adopted for the committee of psychological examiners

In accordance with NJSA 45: 1-7.5, which governs standards for renewal, reinstatement and reactivation of psychology licenses as well as the ability of the Board of Psychological Examiners to license out-of-state practitioners, the NJ Board of Psychological Examiners adopted new rules September 14, 2021 following a lengthy notice and comment period beginning February 18, 2020. This recent administrative action has repealed and added certain provisions under NJAC 13: 42-5.3 and 10.17, and 10.18, and amended some other provisions under NJAC 13:42 -9.3, 10.4, 10.18 and 11.4.

Among other things, the new rule codified under NJAC 13: 42-5.3 allows the Board of Psychological Examiners to issue a license to an applicant if the Board determines that the state in which the applicant is licensed has licensing standards that are substantially equivalent to its own standards and which the applicant has practiced for at least two years during the five years preceding the license application. In addition, the new rule provides standards for determining whether a licensee is in good standing and whether an examination is substantially similar to that required by the Commission.

Additionally, this new rule repeals and replaces NJAC 13: 42-10.17 in order to update it to incorporate the license renewal requirements under NJSA 45: 1-7.1. The new wording defines the notification requirements for inactive licensees and clarifies the renewal process. Section 10.18 further develops the license reactivation process, including continuing professional education requirements and the possibility of an exam to ensure the practitioner’s competence and safety.

HIV, STD and TB Services Division

The New Jersey Department of Health’s Division of HIV, STD, and TB Services has issued a proposed rule September 7 seeking to amend NJAC 8:57 and 8:65 which govern reporting requirements for AIDS and HIV. The purpose of the proposed rule, in part, is to re-code the current NJAC 8: 57-2, (Reporting of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and Infection with Human Immunodeficiency Virus), as a new NJAC 8:65, (HIV Infection Reporting ), to reflect the administrative transfer of HIV services that the Ministry of Health provides from the Division of Epidemiology, Environmental and Labor Health to the Division of HIV, STD and TB Services. The Ministry of Health has also proposed certain modifications, repeals and new rules to these articles.

The changes to chapter 8:57 and subsequent changes to 8:65 are substantial. The Department of Health also provides a substantial reminder of the history of the rules and the reasons why such changes need to be made. In summary, the proposed rule provides the reporting requirements for HIV infections in terms of who, what and where to report, as well as the content of reporting and penalties for non-compliance. The proposed rule also incorporated substantial resources and texts by reference.

The comment period for the proposed rule ends on November 6, 2021.


Gillibrand calls for increased funding to alleviate shortage of healthcare workers


Senator Kirsten Gillibrand is looking to increase funding to help train the next generation of healthcare professionals, including those from generally underserved communities, amid a growing shortage of healthcare workers exacerbated by the pandemic.

Gillibrand wrote to Senate leaders on Monday asking lawmakers to increase funding by at least $ 20 million, for a total of $ 67 million, in FY2022 spending bills for the program. Area Health Education Center.

The 250 AHEC programs nationwide, including one that serves Long Island, Queens and Brooklyn, recruit, train and retain a diverse group of young aspiring healthcare professionals from college to college, proving educational assistance, financial aid , mentoring and internships.

In a Monday press conference at Stony Brook University, Gillibrand said, “Over the past year and a half, our healthcare system and our healthcare providers have been at historic levels of stress. They have worked day and night at greater risk than ever before to meet the growing demand for health care and to keep fellow New Yorkers healthy. They are in desperate need of reinforcements. The staff are physically and emotionally exhausted.

Even before the COVID-19 pandemic, the country struggled to fill a growing shortage of doctors and nurses. The pandemic has exasperated this crisis, experts said, with a projected nationwide deficit of up to 124,000 physicians by 2034, while New York alone could be short of more than 39,000 registered nurses d ‘by 2030.

This shortage, officials said, now extends to physiotherapists and occupational therapists, pharmacists, social workers, medical assistants and speech language pathologists.

But the pandemic has also revealed disparities in health care outcomes, with a higher proportion of blacks and Hispanics succumbing to the virus.

Creating a culturally and ethnically diverse health workforce could improve these outcomes, said Stacy Jaffee Gropack, dean of the School of Health Technology and Management at Stony Brook University.

“It is important to recognize that diversity extends to patient care outcomes,” said Gropack. “Minority patients have greater acceptance and confidence in the care of practitioners who are of the same race and ethnicity.”

There are three regional centers and nine AHECs located across the state. During the pandemic, the Brooklyn-Queens-Long Island AHEC launched a virtual program to train young people in homebound elderly surveillance and immunizations, said Gabrielle Kersaint, executive director of the facility.

“We are committed to increasing the diversity of the health professions by increasing access and opportunities for underserved and under-represented students,” said Kersaint.

Other factors are causing a shortage of manpower in the health sector. This month, Governor Kathy Hochul announced that 3% of workers – nearly 34,000 statewide – in hospitals, nursing homes, home care agencies and adult care facilities were forced to quit their jobs after refusing to be vaccinated against COVID.

While the vaccine’s mandate has exacerbated an already growing shortage in many health careers, Gillibrand said the requirement would save lives.

“It is the wisest choice,” she said.


Vaccination rates for Missouri nursing home workers are low

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Missouri nursing home workers have the second-lowest COVID-19 vaccination rate in the country, according to recently released federal data.

Although the vast majority of residents in Missouri long-term care homes are now vaccinated, rates have lagged among the workers responsible for their care, with 45% still unvaccinated. A pending federal mandate could soon force unvaccinated nursing home staff across the state to roll up their sleeves – or risk losing their jobs.

Since the start of the pandemic, 3,791 residents of Missouri nursing homes have died from COVID-19. Almost 1 in 3 of them deaths occurred in St. Louis County.

Just over 86% of Missouri nursing home residents are fully immunized, slightly more than the national average for the United States.

Unvaccinated people in their 80s have the greatest chance of dying from COVID-19 – but even for vaccinated people in this age group, the disease can be fatal. Fully vaccinated people over 80 years of age have a 13 times more likely to die COVID-19, compared to vaccinated people of all ages.

Because elderly nursing home residents living in nearby neighborhoods are very vulnerable to infection, workers can unknowingly trigger outbreaks in a facility, Jenny Hollandsworth said, long-term care ombudsman for the state of Missouri.

“We have staff who are in their communities who may have pockets of high positivity rates and then they come back into the facility and potentially bring that to a resident,” Hollandsworth said. “Having staff vaccinated adds another layer of protection. “

Some human rights organizations, including the AARP, have uses facilities to require vaccination of employees, following an increase in the number of cases among residents and staff of retirement homes over the summer.

“The high death rates from COVID among nursing home residents and staff have been a national disgrace,” AARP executive vice president Nancy A. LeaMond said in a press release. “As new variations emerge, installations cannot allow preventable problems to reoccur. The key is to increase immunizations, and to do it now.

Concerns over worsening staff shortages

The Biden administration announced in August that all U.S. nursing homes would be required to immunize staff or risk losing federal funding.

But the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which regulate the healthcare industry, have yet to release official rules on the warrant. Without a clear idea of ​​when the regulations will take effect, nursing home operators have been left in limbo.

Some managers fear that vaccination mandates will get worse long-standing staff shortagesaid Jessica Rogalski, an ombudsman for VOYCE, a non-profit organization that advocates for nursing home residents and their families.

“I’ve spoken to a lot of facility managers, and they’re very worried about what the future holds,” said Rogalski, who covers the northeastern corner of Missouri. “They’re having enough trouble trying to get employees already, but if they cut employees because of the tenure, how are they going to get more?” “

Several smaller facilities where the majority of staff are not vaccinated told him they would be forced to close once the mandate goes into effect, Rogalski said.

Federal officials have not explicitly specified whether all nursing home staff, including janitorial and catering workers, will be required to be vaccinated – or whether the requirements will be limited to healthcare workers.

Since many hospitals already require vaccinations, nursing home workers who choose to forgo the vaccine may find it difficult to find another job in the healthcare industry, Hollandsworth said.

“If you want to stay in the healthcare business, chances are you need to get the vaccine wherever you go,” she said. “So we hope this might encourage people who are really passionate about long-term care to go ahead and get the shot.”

Follow Shahla on Twitter: @shahlafarzan



What’s Wrong With Qualified Nursing Facilities Chroniclers


A friend called me recently and asked me to write this column. It’s about how understaffed the skilled nursing facilities in California (and maybe elsewhere in the country, although I understand Arizona is swimming in luxury by comparison). And the staff who do the job, not nurses, but CNAs, certified practical nurses, are underpaid and in short supply.

As a result, patients who are helpless, unable to get out of bed or walk, call for help and may have to wait hours to get it. Here is the sad story of my friend. She broke her hip and after the surgery she was sent to what is considered to be one of the best Medicare qualified nursing facilities in Northern California.

The first thing to do when she arrived was to fill out three forms outlining her food preferences. When a tray arrived it was overloaded with food, most of which she couldn’t eat. My friend felt that maybe the food service considers the elderly to be picky eaters, so it is best to offer them an array of choices including lots of candy. Turns out she wasn’t alone. Most patients returned trays full of uneaten food, an expensive and unnecessary waste. Why not imitate the hospital system? Give patients a budget as much for each meal (in the hospital you pay what you choose) and make them choose while respecting the dietary restrictions? You would have well-nourished patients and little if any waste of food or money.

But the major problem is the overworked staff and their inability to show up when someone rings the bell for help. She did not know how many patients were assigned to the CNAs. They keep patients clean, many of whom wear diapers, change their sheets and clothes, check their vital signs several times a day, and if they can get out of bed, help them get around in a wheelchair. They are the ones who take care of all the patient’s needs. The nurses come a few times a day to give the patients their medication. (DACs are not allowed to do this). My friend said they brought him whatever was in his computer medical history, even the ones that were no longer needed or, worse yet, medications that could adversely affect his current condition. She was relieved to still have the head to refuse unnecessary and harmful drugs. What about patients who haven’t?

NACs are also responsible for bringing trays of food to their patients. My friend thought it was the most inefficient and dangerous use of his time. During the delivery of the meal trays, they are unable to respond to calls for help from patients. My friend fell because of it. She had trained with the physiotherapist, learning the painful path of walking again. She was exhausted after the session. The therapist brought her back to her room but could not help her get back to bed. She must have left for another client. She left my friend in the wheelchair and my friend pressed the bell for help. He only arrived 30 or 40 minutes later because his ANC was delivering trays of food.

By the time she arrived my friend was so tired that she fell trying to get up. It wasn’t a bad fall. The NAC helped catch him. But she fell on the injured hip. The nurse came in to make sure she was okay and said the facility doctor would be around soon to take a look.

But the doctor never came. She finally called him and asked him to make sure she was okay and could get out of bed. He said it wasn’t necessary and he understood it wasn’t a bad fall. My friend insisted and said if he didn’t come he had to send the physiotherapist to make sure she was okay and up to par.

After my friend told me this story, I discovered that it was not an isolated incident. Even the most important patient could suffer for hours. A world famous pediatric cardiologist who wrote the textbook used in most medical schools and was a star of his Southern California hospital and medical school was in his own skilled nursing facility in his own hospital . This was before COVID and her daughter visited her one night. She found him on the floor. “What happened daddy?” ” she asked. He said he called for help and no one had come.

The Assistance League celebrates its 60th anniversary on B Street. Its programs include Operation School Bell, which provides back-to-school clothing to nearly 2,000 children each year.

Sue Lempert is the former mayor of San Mateo.

His column is broadcast every Monday. She may be


“We are fighting this battle, and it keeps coming and going”


“The first year was tough,” Ali said. “After January, when we got the vaccine, it was more depression because a lot of people that we lost, we felt like it was a preventable loss.”

To exploreMore Ohioans Under 50 Die From COVID-19 Than Ever

After treating coronavirus patients for 20 months, hospital staff see no end in sight as they face a younger patient population and growing abuse from those who embrace disinformation and see them as the enemy. This is in addition to the stressful conditions they endured throughout the pandemic, such as wearing personal protective equipment for long hours, fear of bringing the virus home, lower staff levels than optimal and extra shifts to cope with the large influx of high people. need patients.

Exhausted, exhausted healthcare workers

As of Friday, 269 hospital patients in the region had COVID-19. At the height of the current outbreak, just over 400 hospital patients in the region had COVID-19. Even as this fourth wave eases somewhat, workers who treat coronavirus patients are still overwhelmed and fearful of further waves.

Legend

Vicki Laywell is a registered respiratory therapist at Kettering Health where she has treated COVID-19 patients throughout the pandemic. She said she recently treated a patient in his twenties who had to be transferred to another hospital to be put on life support. “Seeing someone in their twenties and they’ve got their whole life ahead of them, and hugging the mother and knowing that she can see her son alive again and she can’t, it’s just very exhausting to us, ”she said. Photo submitted.

Vicki Laywell, a respiratory therapist at Kettering Medical Center, said she felt like she was in a war zone.

“We are leading this battle and it keeps coming and going,” Laywell said. “I have a feeling that if the public could go through a COVID intensive care unit and see what these people are dealing with, it would change their perspective on wearing masks, vaccination, hand washing, limiting your inner circle of family and friends. You want to be around next year and if you get this COVID … there are so many that don’t survive, and when they do survive they sometimes go through life-long changes in their physical health. “

Patricia O’Malley, a nurse researcher at Premier Health, said the coronavirus had transformed hospitals into field hospital-like environments.

“We know that continued exposure to all of this high acuity over that period of time results in mental distress, mental distress, anxiety, exhaustion and sadness,” O’Malley said. “And the idea that much of what we see now with our unvaccinated population is unnecessary is particularly difficult.”

A national survey of more than 5,000 registered nurses released last month by National Nurses United, found that about 42% of nurses feel sad or depressed more often than before the pandemic, and more than a third do. traumatized by their experiences of patient care.

“Too much chores, too little time to take care of yourself, too much stress,” said Bernadette Melnyk, dean of the Ohio State University College of Nursing. “And all of this affects our nurses, doctors and other healthcare workers, and it compromises the quality and safety of care. “

To exploreLocal doctors answer readers’ questions: COVID vaccine safe for pregnant women

Sable Morgan, a nursing team leader in the intensive care unit at Miami Valley Hospital, was feeling so exhausted that she went from full-time to part-time in February.

“Dealing with the death toll that we are seeing is really wreaking havoc on you,” Morgan said. “It’s moving because no matter how hard we fight, it’s just kind of a never-ending fight. It’s exhausting. It’s not seeing the light at the end of the tunnel that makes it more difficult… And that was sort of, I have to withdraw a bit or I don’t know if I can continue breastfeeding.

Sable Morgan, a nurse in the intensive care unit at Miami Valley Hospital, said:
Legend

Sable Morgan, a nurse in the intensive care unit at Miami Valley Hospital, said: “It’s touching because no matter how hard we fight, it’s just kind of a never-ending fight. C It’s exhausting. tunnel, I think, that’s what makes it the most difficult. ” Photo submitted.

Credit: William J Jones

Credit: William J Jones

Misinformation and abuse

“We get a lot of hate, we get a lot of bullying, we have a lot of people yelling at us, and it’s all political,” said Kelly Schlotterbeck, respiratory therapist working at Christ Hospital in Cincinnati and Miami Valley South.

Schlotterbeck and other health workers in the region said the number of patients seeking dangerous and untested treatments they were seeing online had spiraled out of control.

“Someone asked if we can nebulize hydrogen peroxide because apparently there’s a TikTok video where someone says nebulizing hydrogen peroxide will help COVID,” she said. “It would be incredibly dangerous, he’s a free radical. It is totally not recommended. And these are the things people ask for. I’ve had people say to us, ‘You’re not doing enough to help me.’ “

To exploreYour COVID Questions Answered: Local Doctors Talk About Vaccines, Side Effects, Fertility

She said another patient treated by a colleague refused a much needed blood transfusion by staff, unless staff could prove the blood was from a donor who was not vaccinated against COVID- 19.

“What worries me is the mistrust of the public,” said Schlotterbeck. “An opinion is not the opinion of an expert. And I feel like the public thinks more that because they read it, they can demand what’s going on in their care no matter how ridiculous it is, and I’m really worried that when it will stop.

Nurses and other healthcare workers were revered as heroes when the pandemic began, Morgan said, but now they are being treated as enemies for promoting vaccination.

The National Nurses United survey found that 31% of hospital nurses had experienced violence at work, up from 22% in their March survey.

People’s fears about vaccines and the virus are valid, O’Malley said, but misinformation – particularly the belief that natural immunity is sufficient or that an untested substance will treat the coronavirus – is a threat to the public health.

Patients hospitalized with COVID-19 and their families are understandably desperate for anything that gives them hope, Laywell said.

“And it’s so sad, because the vaccine is the hope they should have turned to before,” Laywell said, fighting back tears. “It’s just become such a political situation, and that’s when you’re up there you see people gasping for air and trying to decide, ‘Should I use a fan because I probably won’t wake up? “There is nothing political about this.”

To exploreWarren County high school teacher dies of COVID-19
Karen Davis is a nurse in the intensive care unit at Dayton Children's Hospital.  MARSHALL GORBY  STAFF
Legend

Karen Davis is a nurse in the intensive care unit at Dayton Children’s Hospital. MARSHALL GORBY STAFF

Patients leave forever changed

Hospital workers across the region warn that even patients who survive hospitalization with COVID-19 are forever changed by the experience. The reality depresses the staff even more, as many cases of rescued patients are not seen as a victory.

“People constantly talk about the 99% survival rate,” Schlotterbeck said. “I really want the public to realize that even people who go on oxygen, or await a lung transplant or go on dialysis with chronic kidney disease afterwards, they are included in that 99%. But their lives are going to be so impacted.

Never able to work again. Stay on fans the rest of their lives. Never walk again.

“I wish the public knew more,” said Schlotterbeck. “I had a patient last night who has been there for about four months. He’s COVID resolved but he’s still on a ventilator, and we’re having a hard time getting him down. “

Chronic symptoms like brain fog, shortness of breath, loss of taste and smell can last a long time after contracting COVID-19, Ali said.

“I still see a good number of these patients in my lung clinic with scar tissue in their lungs,” he said.

A June study found that 45% of patients hospitalized for COVID-19 still suffered from health issues related to their discharge.

Karen Davis, a nurse in the intensive care unit at Dayton Children’s Hospital, said being hospitalized with COVID-19 is a life-changing experience for children.

“The patients I took care of, the youngest was 9 years old and the oldest was 17. They all had difficulty breathing,” she said. “The one that impressed me the most was a young man of 17 and I took care of him early in his illness process. And it was just hard to watch him… he got very anxious because he couldn’t breathe, and I try to say to him ‘Try to slow down your breathing.’ All the while I knew he couldn’t breathe. It’s just hard to watch them struggle… They realize their own mortality, and it’s a bit young to be aware of it.


Have questions about COVID-19, face masks, vaccines, testing, quarantine, or anything else related to the pandemic? Send them to jordan.laird@coxinc.com. Responses will be published regularly in print and online.


Love Blossoms for Seniors in Pandemic Nursing Home

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GEORGE TOWN: When Cupid shot them, there was no escape because love has no age limit.

The story began when Kathleen Dielenberg, 83, began staying in a private retirement home in Bayan Lepas whenever her son had to travel to Singapore for work.

She would be alone and would be homesick. And it got worse when the pandemic struck and movement restrictions were enforced.

About three months ago, she met Paul Chew Chooi Hin, 81, who was also staying at home.

One day, a sad Dielenberg told Chew how much she wished she could go home.

Chew, who was more optimistic, told him that if they could build a house there, then they wouldn’t need to think of another place like home.

It led to days of laughter and long conversations.

Eventually, they told the co-founder of the retirement home, Tan Soo Siang, that they had decided to get married.

“We took about 10 days to plan the wedding and it was celebrated with 19 other residents and caretakers.

“It was a simple but happy occasion for everyone,” said Tan, 33.

Tan said they accompanied Chew on the walk to Dielenberg’s room to take him to the lobby for the cake-cutting ceremony.

“All the other residents were so happy for them. Throughout the movement control order, our residents were quite depressed because they couldn’t see their friends and family for months.

“So the celebration cheered everyone up. “

She said they were all wearing their finest clothes and were excited for the bride and groom.

The couple exchanged vows, promising “to have and keep from that day forward, for better or for worse, for the richest or the poorest, sick and healthy, to love and to cherish, until death do us part “.

Tan said Chew lost his wife a few years ago while Dielenberg’s husband left her when her son was only one year old.

“Dielenberg was a single mother until she met Chew.

“Their children are happy that their parents were able to find love at their age and gave them their blessings,” she said, adding that Chew had four sons who are all overseas.

She said they had no objections to marriage as long as their parents were happy.

The wedding, she said, reunited Dielenberg’s son and two family members from Chew’s side.

“The others attended via Zoom,” she said.


Why U.S. healthcare workers are stepping up their fight for fair treatment and patient safety


This article was produced by the Independent Media Institute.

In recent months, so many people with COVID-19 have sought treatment at Providence St. Mary Medical Center that the hospital has sorted patients into a tent outside the facility and set up a makeshift room in the main hall.

Many workers are doing 2 and 4 hour shifts to keep the Southern California facility up and running during the crisis, some comforting the dying and others volunteering to use their Spanish skills to help communicate over the phone with the dying. poor family members.

But instead of recognizing workers who risked their lives and burned out, the hospital escalated the tension by demanding concessions and dragging out contract negotiations for more than a year.

Across the country, hospitals continue to stretch workers to breaking point and endanger the entire healthcare system.

“The point is, without us hospitals have no one,” observed Alma Garzon, president of United Steelworkers (USW) Local 183, which represents hundreds of workers at Providence St. Mary.

“Some of them don’t understand what we’re really doing,” Garzon said of the hospital executives. “The superiors are not going to come and take care of our patients. They’re not going to get their hands dirty.

The pandemic has exacerbated staff shortages that plagued hospitals, nursing homes and other health facilities long before COVID-19.

To protect their communities during the crisis, workers mobilized, worked strenuous overtime and took on extra duties. Yet Garzon said when union officials spoke about the need to invest in workers and take action to increase staffing levels, management’s response was, “You signed up for this. “

“It was a big slap in the face,” said Garzon, whose members ratified a new contract on Oct. 7, after about 15 months of being blocked from the hospital.

More and more health systems treat workers with the same contempt.

This is fueling widespread exhaustion and fatigue and is forcing a growing number of healthcare workers to step up their fights for fair treatment and patient safety.

Nurses at a Massachusetts hospital began a strike seven months ago. Workers at the New York and Oregon facilities have also been on a picket line in recent weeks.

Another potential flashpoint is California’s Inland Empire. About 7,400 members of Steelworkers Local 7600 are among tens of thousands of workers at Kaiser Permanente facilities who recently authorized a strike over demands from management that would impoverish their families and compromise care.

While the conglomerate has maintained a healthy bottom line during the pandemic, it wants to maintain the wages of current workers and drastically reduce pay scales for new hires, a punch that will certainly worsen staff shortages and put hospitals at risk. .

Adding insult to injury, the healthcare system intends to implement the proposal at the expense of workers in environmental services, dietetics and other behind-the-scenes departments.

All of them fulfill essential roles in patient care.

Yet because these workers have a low profile, healthcare systems often treat them like consumables and try to cut corners at their expense. The pay scale proposed by Kaiser Permanente would introduce new workers around the California minimum wage and remove their earning potential for the rest of their lives.

” It’s not good. It’s disrespectful and an outrage for healthcare workers
all over. Everyone deserves a living wage, ”said Norberto Gomez, vice-president
President of Local 7600.

Instead of urgently seeking an agreement, Kaiser Permanente retaliated against the workers by threatening to suspend or cancel contractual holidays until the end of the labor dispute. He even stooped to harassing workers who wore union t-shirts.

Like their counterparts in California and across the country, Jackie Anklam and about 620 other workers at Ascension St. Mary’s Hospital in Saginaw, Mich., Have taken on additional responsibilities during the pandemic.

The Greeters repeatedly risked exposure to COVID-19 by handing out fresh masks to everyone entering the hospital. The phlebotomists performed driving tests for coronavirus in the parking lots of the establishment.

And environmental service workers risk their lives disinfecting floors, walls, linens and furnishings in rooms occupied by COVID-19 patients. Hour-long cleanings, carried out in gowns, gloves and goggles, often left workers drenched in sweat.

Yet like Garzon and Gomez, Anklam found itself struggling to preserve workers’ hard-earned benefits in contract negotiations with ungrateful executives.

“I just think they underestimate the work of my members,” said Anklam, president of Steelworkers Local 9899. “I don’t know why they don’t get it. They don’t see the big picture.

The disrespect only made Anklam and his colleagues fight harder. They stood firm and got salary increases and benefit increases.

“The members have spoken,” Anklam said.

The workers at Kaiser Permanente want nothing more than the healthcare system to come to its senses and take the necessary steps to avoid a strike.

But they are realizing that they cannot truly care for their patients without also providing for themselves and their families and holding the health care system accountable. Right now, with the pandemic still raging, their commitment to lousy treatment is all that keeps dozens of Kaiser Permanente facilities open to the public.

“People are sick and tired, and they’ve had enough, and they’re ready to stand up and fight back,” Gomez said.

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Not paid when evacuating the retirement home

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Several employees of a Lafourche parish nursing home who were evacuated to a warehouse in Tangipahoa parish during Hurricane Ida are suing the owner of the establishment for unpaid wages.

Five nurses from South Lafourche Nursing and Rehab filed a September 29 class action lawsuit in Jefferson Parish against Baton Rouge businessman Bob Dean and seven nursing homes he owns.

About 850 residents of these nursing homes were evacuated to an Independence-based warehouse owned by Dean before the Category 4 storm that made landfall on August 29 in southeast Louisiana.

Since then, several lawsuits have been filed against Dean, alleging that the evacuees endured nightmarish conditions because they were crammed into the poorly equipped facility.

Dean’s facilities have all since been shut down by the state health department. An attorney for Dean has said he plans to appeal the action.

Lawsuits:Three other residents of nursing home evacuated to warehouse during Ida’s trial in Lafourche

According to the health ministry, five deaths were directly linked to the evacuation, but 27 other residents of nursing homes who were transferred to the warehouse also died.

Employees allege in court documents that they worked “excessively long hours” at the warehouse from August 27 to September 2, but were not paid in full for the work they did.

According to the complaint, nurses are expected to earn a “hurricane special rate of pay” of $ 750 to $ 3,000 per day during evacuations based on their qualifications, but the complainants’ pay checks did not reflect the increase in pay. .

“Very exaggerated”:Lawyer for nursing home owner disputes reports of horrific conditions

New Orleans attorney Jonathan C. Pedersen, who represents the plaintiffs, said one of the nurses contacted him about the discrepancy.

“She was very upset and told me that she worked around the clock and was not paid for all of her work,” Pedersen said. “Once I met her and understood the facts, it was a very obvious case that needed to be closed. You receive a hurricane pay rate that is an amount higher than your typical 365 day salary due to the nature of what is going on. All of my clients came to the retirement home and helped evacuate all residents to the Independence facility. While they were there they tried to make the best of an absolutely horrible situation.

Baton Rouge attorney John McLindon, who represents Dean, said the employees’ lawsuit was the result of a misunderstanding.

“There was just a communication breakdown,” McLindon said on Friday. “Bob told them they would get this special salary, but they thought it would be on top of their regular salary. They thought they were entitled to this money in addition to their regular salary, but this will be resolved.

Evacuations in retirement homes:“Profit should never compromise care”: lawsuit alleges evacuation of Houma retirement home resulted in death of resident

Pedersen said he wanted his clients to get their due after enduring horrific conditions during the evacuation.

“The top executives all had hotel rooms where they could shower and sleep, but none of my clients had that luxury,” he said. “Some of them had to drive 13 miles to a truck stop to take a shower. They did not feed them properly and lived on snacks from a gas station. They are human beings and we do not treat our dogs that way.

– Editor-in-Chief Dan Copp can be reached at 448-7639 or dan.copp@houmatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter @DanVCopp.


Dealing with Ageism in Healthcare: A Conversation for Patients, Caregivers and Clinicians



Can’t see the video player? See the video here.


What does ageism look like in health care? It can be a thoughtless joke that makes an older person feel diminished. Or an assumption that patients are unable to follow a conversation or make their own decisions. Maybe it happens when a concern is raised and then dismissed or dismissed.

Ageism is reflected in care strategies that ignore the patient’s values ​​and ideas about what constitutes a productive life. Too often attitudes such as “these patients are old and nearing the end anyway” or “there isn’t much we can do to help them” prevail.

Ageism is nothing new, but the covid pandemic has shockingly highlighted it. In its early days, the virus was ignored as a concern primarily for the elderly, with some arguing that it was consumable if the alternative shut down the economy. In the severe months that followed, many people who died in nursing care were dehumanized in reports showing body bags piled up outside the facilities. To date, around 80% of those who have died from covid-19 have been seniors, including nearly 140,000 nursing home residents – a population plagued by understaffing, inadequate infection control and disease. negligence.

KHN and the John A. Hartford Foundation hosted a web event on Thursday. Judith Graham, Navigating Aging columnist for KHN, moderated the discussion. She was joined by:

  • Dr Louise Aronson, geriatrician, professor of medicine at the University of California-San Francisco and author of “Elderhood”.
  • Dr Michael Wasserman, geriatrician, advocate for vulnerable seniors during the pandemic and head of the public policy committee of the California Association of Long Term Care Medicine.
  • Dr Javette Orgain, family physician and medical director of the Longevity Health Plan of Illinois, which serves residents of nursing homes; past president of the National Medical Association, which represents African American physicians and their patients; and former Assistant Dean of the University of Illinois-Chicago Urban Health Program.
  • Dr Rebecca Elon, geriatrician and caregiver for her mother, who suffers from dementia, and her husband, who died earlier this year.
  • Jess maurer, lawyer and executive director of the Maine Council on Aging, which promotes anti-ageism commitment.

Related topics

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Nursing home infection prevention surveys are down

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Targeted Infection Control (FIC) investigations appear to be on the decline at a time when some members of the skilled nursing industry still remain concerned about the nature of the relationship with investigators throughout the COVID pandemic. 19.

FIC surveys were conducted 756 times in June this year, up from 8,896 times in June 2020 – a 91.5% year-over-year decrease, according to data provided by the Homes Data Analyzer nursing. StarPRO.

The latest data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) is part of a larger trend. FIC investigations fell below the number of standard investigations in June 2021 for the first time since last March, when CMS suspended all non-urgent investigation work and refocused its efforts on adhering to monitoring policies. agency infections.

Chart courtesy of StarPRO, data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS)

In June, 761 standard surveys and 756 FIC surveys were conducted, compared to a year earlier when there were 594 standard surveys and 8,896 FIC surveys.

There was, however, a peak in the FIC surveys conducted from July to August – 597 versus 1,022 respectively. This could possibly be attributed to an increase in the number of surveyors as a result of the delta variant emergency, according to Spencer Blackman, product manager for StarPRO.

The results of these FIC surveys are also trending downward. Aside from a recent spike in August, like the number of surveys, the number of deficiencies found on each infection control survey has declined.

Jason Lundy, a shareholder in the Chicago office of national law firm Polsinelli, told Skilled Nursing News that because CMS suspended non-urgent investigative work, he saw several examples of facilities cited for a past incident. which has since been resolved.

This opens up the possibility that civil monetary penalties (CMP) “may be longer and more severe”.

“They’re meant to be corrective to fix things, not punitive just to increase government revenue or to put a penalty or black mark on a facility,” Lundy said. “If something has already been dealt with by the time the expert reviews it, there is not much restorative purpose in the citations or additional penalties.”

Blackman said the general trend “may be the new normal” for these types of surveys in the future.

“We’ve kind of thought for a long time that with COVID and the flu also being a big thing in nursing homes, infection control might just be a part of adult life in the future,” Blackman said. . “If they have to be done at the same frequency as a standard investigation or on complaints, that could be the new standard. ”

Even though FIC surveys appear to be on the decline, states are not keeping pace with standard surveys. States should conduct about 1,300 surveys each month in order to meet the CMS goal of each household having a standard survey every 12 months, Blackman said.

CMS reported 844 new standard surveys as of September, according to StarPRO data.

Of 15,295 nursing homes nationwide, 10,913, or 71%, went at least 16 months without a standard investigation as of May 31, according to an updated report filed by the US Department’s Office of the Inspector General of Health and Social Services.

“I think earlier in the pandemic they could have said they couldn’t get into homes or were busy focusing on infection control investigations, but now that these have stabilized , I really feel like there’s sort of less of an excuse as to why they can’t go in there and do these standard surveys, ”Blackman said.


WKCTC Paducah Junior College Foundation Raises Funds for Health Care Education | New







Nearly 50 college supporters, faculty, staff and community attended the Paducah Junior College launch event to announce its $ 3,000,000 HealthCare COUNTS campaign on Tuesday, October 19.




PADUCAH – The West Kentucky Community and Technical College has launched an endowment fundraiser to support its health care education programs.

WKCTC’s charitable foundation, the Paducah Junior College Foundation, on Tuesday kicked off the public phase of a $ 3 million endowment campaign called HealthCare COUNTS with around 50 supporters, staff and community members in the Allied lobby College Health Building.

The campaign will fund an occupational health care training endowment for WKCTC health care training programs, the college said in a press release. The campaign will continue until October of next year.

Paducah Junior College executive director Lee Emmons said the foundation has already raised 60% of its $ 3 million goal, thanks to people who have already responded to the campaign and some of the funding. philanthropist MacKenzie Scott donated to WKCTC last year. During the public phase of the campaign, the foundation is working to raise $ 1.8 million.

WKCTC said nomination opportunities are available for campaign donors, which provide a way to honor a loved one, draw attention to a business, or show a commitment to quality healthcare. and health care education in Paducah.

The college said the PJC Foundation will match every dollar raised by October 2022 up to $ 1 million. The Kentucky Community and Technical College System also provides matching funds for specific major gifts.

The WKCTC said Lee informed attendees of the launch event that anyone who donates $ 1,000 or more will be recognized on a donor wall in the entrance to the Allied Health Building. “I hope we have two walls. And every giveaway, no matter how much, counts,” Lee said.

Citing reports on the Kentucky job, the WKCTC said there were 30,000 positions open for registered nurses in Kentucky, 8,000 positions for licensed practical nurses and at least 26,000 positions for allied health professionals, such as dental assistants, diagnostic ultrasound technologists, medical laboratory technicians, physiotherapy assistants. , radiologists, surgical technologists and pharmacy technologists.

Lee said graduates of WKCTC nursing and paramedical programs typically have 100% placement, and the Education-to-Work campaign and endowment will help ensure that healthcare education continues to meet the needs. of the work force.

To contribute to HealthCare COUNTS and the Healthcare-to-Work Endowment Fund, contact Lee Emmons at lee.emmons@kctcs.edu or 270-534-3084.


Thousands of Oregon healthcare workers sacked for refusing vaccine | Local News


GRESHAM, Ore. (KPTV) – A big deadline for Oregon has passed.

Now, all of the state’s healthcare workers are vaccinated, as Governor Kate Brown’s compliance mandate expired on Monday. Those who refused the vaccine were fired.

In a video posted Tuesday, Brown thanked Oregon residents for receiving the vaccine.

“You’ve helped protect some of our most critical workplaces from disruption caused by COVID-19,” Brown said.

PORTLAND, Oregon (KPTV) – In a new COVID-19 forecast, the OHSU predicts that we should achieve collective immunity in Oregon by mid-December.

Healthcare workers and teachers are among those who need to be vaccinated at work. The vast majority of these workers have received the vaccine, but thousands of people who oppose it are now unemployed.

“It’s really emotional not to go back to what you know, what you feel safe in,” said Robyn Robinson, a nurse from Gresham who has not been vaccinated. “You are no longer safe. Not knowing overnight and knowing that you are not the only one.

Robinson said she is currently on sick leave as she rushed to have her foot surgery before losing health care.

Hoping to retire with Legacy Health, Robinson said she has spent the past nine years working in a surgical unit. For Robinson, nursing is his passion and his call from God. But He also told her to avoid getting vaccinated through prayer.

“I’m no more of a threat today than when I was working, using all the same PPE was the policy,” she said.

Robinson said her religious exemption was denied, leaving her here disappointed and angry, with tough choices to face.

“Am I going to be able to stay here?” Should I (uproot) and move? Am I leaving my children? Am I leaving my grandchildren? Robinson wondered.

This is something nearly 500 other Legacy Health employees might also wonder, now that they, too, have lost their jobs. Legacy Health vice president and chief nursing officer Kecia Kelly said she doesn’t take it lightly.

“We are sad to see family members leaving the organization, but on the other hand, the staff feel a sense of security,” said Kelly.

According to Legacy, overall, 96% of employees chose vaccination. Initial vaccination rates within the hospital system were 85 percent.

Oregon Nurses Association proposes new policies to retain employees

SALEM, Oregon (KPTV) – As the healthcare worker shortage continues to impact the state of Oregon, the Oregon Nurses Association is proposing…

“Everything we have done, we have done from a safety perspective and our commitment is to be a safe place for our patients to receive care and also to be a safe place to work,” said Kelly said.

The loss of so many employees has forced Legacy to temporarily consolidate some of its services, Kelly said. This includes the temporary closure of some of its GoHealth emergency care clinics.

According to the hospital system, all laid-off Legacy workers are always welcome to return if they decide to go ahead with the vaccine.

Copyright 2021 KPTV-KPDX Broadcasting Corporation. All rights reserved.


An epidemic in a nursing home kills one

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A Covid-19 epidemic in Proença Lar, in the town of Montinho, district of Castelo Branco, has recorded one death and 53 people infected.

In a press release sent to the Lusa agency, the Proença-a-Nova Chamber indicates that the Restricted Municipal Civil Protection Commission “is closely monitoring the development of this situation and support is provided to the home to fight the epidemic. current ”.

According to the municipality, at present, 46 users and seven employees are infected with the new coronavirus.

“Three of the users are hospitalized, while the rest are stable. There is also one death to be recorded, that of a user who also had other health complications, ”the note indicates.

The information indicates that all users are monitored by a medical team who make regular visits to the facilities and that rapid tests are performed on employees every 48 hours.

In addition to the home outbreak, there are also three infected people in the community and 20 people under surveillance.

Since the start of the pandemic, in March 2020, the municipality of Proença-a-Nova has recorded 413 people infected with Covid-19, for a total of 403 cured and 10 deaths, to which are now added 56.


North Dakota State Encourages Return to Health Care Staff


The North Dakota Department of Health (NDDoH) and statewide healthcare providers are encouraging volunteers and those with healthcare experience to join healthcare staff during this time of staffing need. unprecedented.

“Like other health systems nationwide, Sanford Health is experiencing a historic workforce shortage, not only in nursing but in other areas of patient and non-clinical care,” said Theresa Larson, vice president of nursing and clinical services at Sanford Health in Fargo. “Today we are seeing an increase in the number of patients seeking health care. In addition to treating COVID-19 patients, our hospitals are at full capacity. “

“CHI St. Alexius Health would welcome additional mission-oriented team members who are able to provide support to our frontline care team staff during various hours, shifts and roles in an effort to expand our services and meet the growing needs of our community and state, ”said Raumi Kudrna, vice president of patient care services at CHI St. Alexius Health in Bismarck.

To help expand the healthcare workforce, NDDoH has reinstated its Temporary Nursing Assistant registration process, and the North Dakota State Board of Respiratory Care is offering a six-month temporary respiratory therapist license to individuals. currently licensed in good standing in another state.

“North Dakota is in dire need of additional staff in our healthcare facilities,” said Nizar Wehbi, MD, public health official. “Staff shortages can negatively affect patient care and limit the capacity of hospitals and health facilities. We ask for volunteers and anyone with health care experience to join or re-enter the workforce. “

Please contact the human resources department at your local hospital or health facility to see how you can help. Shift lengths and schedules can be very flexible. Even if you are only available 4-8 hours per week, consider calling and helping during this time of urgent need for staff.

For more information on registering NDDoH Temporary Nursing Assistants, please visit https://services.ndnar.org/emergency/

To learn more about the ND State Board of Respiratory Care’s Temporary Respiratory Therapist Licensing, please visit https://www.ndsbrc.com/article.asp?id=10


Update on Maryland’s Top 10 and Last Qualified Nursing Facilities Ranked by Staff Immunization Rate


October 18, 2021

Media contact:

Deidre McCabe, Director, Communications Office, 410-767-3536

Andy Owen, Assistant Director, Media Relations, 410-767-6491

Update on Maryland’s Top 10 and Last Qualified Nursing Facilities Ranked by Staff Immunization Rate

Maryland Department of Health also announces update on facilities that failed to submit adequate data required

Baltimore, Maryland – The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) today announced an update on the top 10 and last qualified nursing facilities in the state, ranked by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. MDH also announced an update on skilled nursing facilities that failed to submit adequate COVID-19 vaccination data as required by the state.

Through vaccination protocols in force since September 1, 2021, all staff in healthcare facilities must have their first or only one dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Healthcare establishments that do not follow vaccination protocols or do not correctly report their vaccination data are subject to fines, civil penalties and enforcement measures.

To date, 99 nursing homes in the state have immunized 91% or more of their staff. A complete list of state nursing facilities and their immunization data is available from the Maryland Department of Aging’s Qualified Nursing Facility Immunization Dashboard, which is updated weekly.

“More than 88 percent of nursing home staff in Maryland have received at least one dose of a life-saving COVID-19 vaccine,” MDH Secretary Dennis R. Schrader said. “By getting vaccinated, they have taken the most important step possible during this pandemic to protect themselves and our elderly loved ones whom they care for on a daily basis.”

“The vast majority of health care facilities in the state are in full compliance with COVID-19 vaccination protocols in place to ensure the safety of residents and staff,” said Rona E. Kramer, secretary of the Maryland Department of Aging. “We are indebted to them and will continue to work with facilities that are not compliant to ensure that their residents and staff are also safe.”

The last 10 skilled nursing homes and assembly facilities in Maryland

classified by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

  1. Fall Lake Health Care in Chesapeake Woods = 49 percent

  2. Dennett Road Manor = 55 percent

  3. Cumberland Health Center = 56 percent

  4. Calvert Manor Rehabilitation and Health Center = 60 percent

  5. Saint Joseph Ministries = 62 percent

Coffman retirement home = 62 percent

  1. Calvert County Nursing Center = 65 percent

  2. Fall Lake Health Care in Parkville = 66 percent

Vindobona Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 66 percent

Charlotte Hall Veterans’ House = 66 percent

  1. Complete Treatments at Corsica Hills = 68 percent

Hagerstown Health Center = 68 percent

  1. Brightwood Powerback Campus Rehabilitation = 69 percent

Sterling Care in the village of Frostburg = 69 percent

Snow Hill Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 69 percent

  1. The Nursing and Rehabilitation Center at Stadium Place = 71 percent

Manokin Rehabilitation and Health Care Center = 71 percent

Nursing home and skilled assembly facilities in Maryland

who have not submitted adequate COVID-19 vaccination data

  1. Long View Center for Rehabilitation and Health Care

  2. Ft. Washington Health Center

  3. Anchorage Health Center

  4. Blue Point Health Center

  5. Chestnut Green Health Center in Blakehurst

  6. Oak Manor Health and Rehabilitation Center

  7. Westminster Health Center

  8. Autumn Lake Health Care at Bridgepark

For more information on CRISP nursing home reporting requirements, please see this transmission to all administrators of retirement homes. Institutions are required to report certain information themselves on a weekly or daily basis.

For establishments with questions about the data reported for their establishment, send an email mdh.snfdata@maryland.gov.

For the most recent data on Maryland COVID-19, visit coronavirus.maryland.gov.

To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment or see if you are eligible for a Pfizer COVID-19 booster, visit covidvax.maryland.gov. To find a place to take a COVID-19 test, visit covidtest.maryland.gov.

– ### –

The Maryland Department of Health is dedicated to protecting and enhancing the health and safety of all people in Maryland through disease prevention, access to care, quality management and commitment community.


follow us on Twitter @MDHealthDept and to Facebook.com/MDHealthDept.



Age discrimination: older people say they feel devalued when interacting with health care providers


A few years ago, she told an emergency doctor that the antibiotic he wanted to prescribe would not counteract the type of urinary tract infection she had.

He wasn’t listening, even when she mentioned her professional references. She asked to see someone else, to no avail. “I was ignored and finally gave up,” said Whitney, who is a lung and urethral cancer survivor and relies on a special catheter to drain urine from her bladder. (An outpatient renal service subsequently changed the prescription.)

Then, earlier this year, Whitney landed in the same emergency room, screaming in pain, with another urinary tract infection and a severe anal fissure. When she asked for Dilaudid, a powerful narcotic that had previously helped her, a young doctor said, “We do not distribute opioids to people who seek them. Let’s just see what Tylenol does.

Whitney said her pain continued unabated for eight hours.

“I think being an 84-year-old woman alone was important. When older people come in like that, they don’t get the same level of commitment to do something to rectify the situation. is like, “Oh, here’s an old man in pain. Well, that happens a lot to the elderly, ”she said.

Whitney’s experiences speak to ageism in healthcare facilities, a long-standing issue that garners attention during the Covid-19 pandemic, which has killed more than half a million Americans aged 65 and over more.

Ageism occurs when people face stereotypes, prejudices or discrimination because of their age. The assumption that all older people are frail and helpless is a common and incorrect stereotype. Stigma can consist of feelings such as “older people are unpleasant and difficult to deal with”. Discrimination is evident when the needs of older people are not recognized and respected or when they are treated less favorably than younger people.

In health care settings, ageism can be explicit. One example: medical care rationing plans (“crisis care standards”) which specify treating young adults before older adults. Embedded in these standards, currently implemented by hospitals in Idaho and parts of Alaska and Montana, is a value judgment: Young people’s lives are worth more because they are likely to have more left over. years to live.

Justice in Aging, an advocacy group, filed a civil rights complaint with the US Department of Health and Human Services in September, accusing Idaho’s crisis care standards of being ageist and asking for a investigation.

Ageism can compromise care

In other cases, ageism is implied. One example is Dr. Julie Silverstein, president of the Atlantic division of Oak Street Health, with doctors presuming that older patients who speak slowly are cognitively compromised and unable to describe their medical problems. If this happens, a doctor may not involve a patient in medical decision-making, which could compromise care, Silverstein said. Oak Street Health operates more than 100 primary care centers for low-income seniors in 18 states.

Emogene Stamper, from the Bronx, New York, fell ill with Covid-19 in March.

Emogene Stamper, 91, from the Bronx in New York, was sent to an underfunded nursing home after falling ill with Covid-19 in March. “It was like a dungeon,” she recalls, “and they didn’t lift a finger to do anything for me,” she said. The assumption that older people are not resilient and cannot recover from illness is implicitly ageist.

No major religious denomination opposes vaccination, but religious exemptions can further complicate mandates

Stamper’s son fought for his mother’s admission to an inpatient rehabilitation hospital where she could receive intensive therapy.

“When I got there, the doctor said to my son, ‘Oh, your mother is 90 years old,’ as if he was a little surprised, and my son said, ‘You don’t know my mother. You don’t know this 90-year-old man, ”Stamper said. “It lets you know how disposable they feel to you once you hit a certain age.”

At the end of the summer, when Stamper was hospitalized with an abdominal problem, a nurse and orderly came to her room with papers to sign. “Oh, you can write! Stamper said the nurse exclaimed loudly when she put her signature. “They were so shocked I was alert, it was insulting. They don’t respect you,” she added.

How seniors can get their game back after being locked up for over a year

Almost 20% of Americans aged 50 and over say they have experienced discrimination in healthcare facilities, according to a 2015 report, and this can lead to inappropriate or inadequate care. A study estimates that the annual health cost of ageism in America, including the over- and under-treatment of common medical conditions, is $ 63 billion.

Nubia Escobar, 75, who emigrated from Colombia almost 50 years ago, wants doctors to spend more time listening to the concerns of older patients. This became an urgent problem two years ago when his longtime cardiologist in New York City retired to Florida and a new doctor struggled to control his high blood pressure.

Nubia Escobar, 75, wants doctors to spend more time listening to older patients.  concerns.

Alarmed that she might pass out or fall because her blood pressure was so low, Escobar sought a second opinion. This cardiologist “rushed me – he didn’t ask a lot of questions and he didn’t listen. He was sitting there talking and looking at my daughter,” she said.

It was Veronica Escobar, an elderly lawyer, who accompanied her mother to this meeting. She remembers the doctor being abrupt and constantly interrupting her mother. “I didn’t like the way he treated her and I could see the anger on my mother’s face,” she said. Nubia Escobar has since seen a geriatrician who concluded that she was over-medicated.

The geriatrician “was patient. How to put it? She made me feel like she was thinking all the time about what could be best for me,” said Nubia Escobar.

Feel invisible

Pat Bailey, 63, receives little of this kind of consideration at the Los Angeles County Nursing Home, Calif., Where she has lived for five years since having a massive stroke and multiple heart attacks. subsequent. “When I ask questions, they treat me like I’m old and stupid and they don’t answer,” she said.

Studies show that one in five nursing home residents suffer from persistent pain, and a significant number do not receive adequate treatment. Bailey, whose left side is paralyzed, said she was among them. “When I tell them what hurts, they either ignore it or tell me now is not the time to take pain medication,” she added.

Covid-19 cases plunge 83% among nursing home staff in the United States, despite reluctance to vaccinate

Most of the time, Bailey feels like “I’m invisible” and like she’s seen as “a slug in a bed, not a real person”. Only one nurse speaks to her regularly and makes her feel that she cares about Bailey’s well-being.

“Just because I’m not walking and doing nothing for myself doesn’t mean I’m not alive. I’m dying inside, but I’m still alive,” she said. declared.

Ed Palent, 88, and his wife, Sandy of Denver, 89, also felt disheartened when they saw a new doctor after their longtime doctor retired.

When their longtime doctor retired, Ed Palent and his wife, Sandy, had to find a new doctor.

“They went for an annual check-up and all this doctor wanted them to do was ask them how they wanted to die and have them sign all kinds of forms,” ​​said their daughter Shelli Bischoff, who has discussed his parents’ experiences with their permission.

“They were very upset and told him, ‘We don’t want to talk about it,’ but he didn’t give up. They wanted a doctor who would help them live, not understand how they were going to die,” Bischoff added. .

The Palents did not return and instead went to another medical office, where a young doctor barely looked at them after performing cursory exams, they said. This doctor failed to identify a dangerous bacterial staph infection on Ed Palent’s arm, which was later diagnosed by a dermatologist. Once again the couple felt neglected and they left.

Now they are with a concierge doctor who has made a sustained effort to get to know them. “It’s the opposite of ageism: it’s’ We care about you and our job is to help you be as healthy as possible for as long as possible. find, “Bischoff added.

KHN (Kaiser Health News) is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism on health issues. Along with policy analysis and surveys, KHN is one of the three main operational programs of the KFF (Kaiser Family Foundation). KFF is an endowed nonprofit organization that provides information on health issues to the nation.


Youth leaders in District 1199c on the rise of healthcare workers ousted by their national union


The leadership of District 1199c, one of Philadelphia’s largest unions, has been removed from office by its national union, the National Union for Hospital and Healthcare Employees (NUHHCE), ousted local leader Chris Woods has confirmed.

NUHHCE took control of the union on Thursday and ousted Woods, president of 1199c, union leaders and the board of directors of their posts.

Woods said in an interview that NUHHCE took over his union because 1199c did not pay the national union the required “per capita” tax on membership dues.

Woods has denied any wrongdoing. He said it’s common to be behind on per capita payments because of a “broken system.” Sometimes employers send workers‘ contributions late, he said. Sometimes their checks bounce.

He called his ouster a political decision, saying he was being targeted “because I am young and African American and because I am not a puppet and I speak out.”

Craig Ford, president of NUHHCE, did not respond to requests for comment. In a statement, the union said on Friday: “This administration aims to rebuild the local and make it a stronger union for local healthcare workers, patients, families and the community.” A spokesperson declined to comment further.

Woods, 36, became the top official at 1199c in 2019, replacing Henry Nicholas, a dominant figure in the world of work and politics who had held the post since 1981 and had been part of the national union since the 1960s. Over the past decade, Nicholas, 85, had groomed Woods as his successor. Woods was part of a horde of new young leaders who took office in 2019.

Attempts to reach Nicholas were unsuccessful.

In January, the union posted an Instagram post defending Woods and Secretary-Treasurer Salima Pace against what the post called “outrageous and bogus claims.”

“The rumors that Chris Woods and Salima Pace have stolen union dues are false,” read the now deleted post.

The post said that Woods and Pace participated in an internal AFSCME hearing which concluded that “no union funds were missing or unaccounted for” and “no union leader illegally used union funds to for personal purposes ”. The post went on to say that some expenses that should have been approved by the board were not – which the post said was not union practice in the past, but would continue now. .

Pace, 36, could not be reached on Friday.

AFSCME did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

NUHHCE, which is based in Old City, Philadelphia, is a subsidiary of AFSCME but can make decisions without AFSCME approval.

Local unions generally operate autonomously from their national or international unions. But national unions can take control if they feel the local union is incapable of governing itself.

Ironworkers Local 401 was placed under what is called a trusteeship in 2014 after the FBI accused local leaders of racketeering and arson. But the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers did not place IBEW Local 98 under trusteeship after Local 98 chief John J. Dougherty was indicted in a federal bribe case. and corruption in 2019. Dougherty’s trial is ongoing.

The union, which represents employees of hospitals and nursing homes, including low-paid workers such as cleaners, warehouse workers and dieticians, has a long heritage in Philadelphia. It was in 1199c, and thanks to Nicholas’ organizational prowess, that the city’s hospitals were unionized in the early 1970s, turning low-paying, no-benefits hospital jobs into jobs you could raise a family. Nicholas was a powerful political broker, whose future mayors and governors sought approval.

The power of 1199c, however, waned, as union density plummeted nationwide and the healthcare industry consolidated, with the acquisition or closure of hospitals. The union, for example, lost around 700 members when the Hahnemann University Hospital closed in 2019.

At the end of 2019, the union represented around 9,700 workers, according to the latest available dossier that the union filed with the federal government. In the 1980s, it represented 13,000 workers.

District 1199c was in the spotlight earlier this month, when Jefferson’s Nursing Assistant Anrae James was reportedly killed by Nursing Assistant Stacey Hayes. Both men have been members of 1199c for at least a decade.

Late Friday afternoon outside the Center City union hall, Woods addressed his ouster, surrounded by his family, politicians and other union leaders. He said he was the victim of harassment and slander.

“These people tried to break me down,” he said, “but I’m here to tell you guys they’re not making it. … This is not the end for me.


State Program Provides Important Advocacy For Long-Term Care and Nursing Home Residents My turn

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Rights are a hot topic this year. COVID-19 has drawn our attention to how we interact with the world around us to a magnificent degree. Nowhere does this come to heart more than those who live in long-term care homes.

With more than one million adults living in nursing and assisted living facilities in the United States, the rights of residents of these facilities are imperative to be understood, respected and upheld. The New Mexico Long Term Care Ombudsman Program (NMLTCOP) does just that.

The ombudsman program has been protected by state and federal mandates since 1972. Every nursing home and assisted living community in the United States has an ombudsman ready to educate, support, coach, and advocate for the rights of residents. In New Mexico, we currently have 72 nursing homes and 240 assisted living communities.

Certified regional coordinators and a volunteer ombudsman work with residents to verify the rights of fairness, liberty, choice, confidentiality and legal representation at each facility. The way this translates into everyday life means that the resident has the right to eat appetizing and nutritious meals, to be treated with respect, to come and go from the facility without unfair restrictions, to choose their own doctor, pharmacy and other health care provider, to accept and refuse medical treatment, and to keep and use their personal effects without losing or damaging them. While COVID has impacted some of these rights, it has not taken them away. They are real. Your ombudsman and volunteer ombudsman can help you navigate these troubled waters.

The sometimes limited ability to enter a LTC facility now means, more than ever, that the ombudsman must be well-staffed, creative and adventurous to meet the needs of residents. The ombudsman is a resource to turn to when it appears that his complaints are not being heard or dealt with. The ombudsman always has confidentiality as a central premise and accepts complaints anonymously and confidentially when it seems to a resident that revealing their identity is too frightening or risky.

The ombudsman program was developed as a voluntary organization. Volunteers remain at the heart of complaint resolution. Ombudsman program volunteers are trained community members whose presence in institutions is vital. In-person visits, electronic meetings such as Zoom, FaceTime, teams, and phone are used successfully instead of face-to-face visits when entry to a facility is restricted due to COVID activity.

The truth is that when one enters a LTC facility, a person’s personal rights are increased and the ombudsman is ready to advocate and work towards that end. The short- or long-term resident who needs advocacy or the community member who wants to be a part of that advocacy is just a phone call away from advice that will make a difference. We can be reached at 866-451-2901.

Gigi Greco is the Regional Coordinator of the New Mexico State Ombudsman Program.


Lincoln Nursing Home Chooses Less Staffing Path by Reducing Beds

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Oct. 15 — A long-term care home in Lincoln opts for a less staff-intensive course as it cuts beds and continues to operate as an assisted living facility in an industry plagued by staff shortages.

Colonial Healthcare’s parent company said this week that the facility would cease to operate as a nursing home, citing insufficient reimbursement for the state’s Medicaid program services and a reluctance by employees to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before. Governor Janet Mills’ vaccine mandate. for healthcare workers takes effect later this month.

The reduction in beds and the change follow recent announcements of three nursing homes – located in Bingham, Whitefield and Deer Isle – that they are considering closing, with staff shortages a dominant factor. An assisted living facility in Biddeford is also planning to close.

The impending vaccination mandate and the COVID-19 pandemic, in which nursing homes have become sites of major coronavirus outbreaks, have exacerbated long-term staff shortages in long-term care. Most nursing homes cited these factors as reasons for employee departures in a summer survey by the Maine Health Care Association, the home lobbying organization.

Some 85.8% of nursing home workers had been vaccinated against COVID-19 by the end of September. Friday is the last day for healthcare workers to obtain the Johnson & Johnson single-injection vaccine to comply with the mandate, which the state will begin to enforce on October 29.

The vaccination rate at Colonial Healthcare, which experienced a coronavirus outbreak of around three dozen cases over the summer as the delta variant increased, was 69% at the end of last month. This outbreak is the result of the virus being introduced into the facility by unvaccinated people, said Andrea Otis-Higgins, chief operating officer of First Atlantic Healthcare, the parent company of Colonial.

Going forward as an assisted living facility means Colonial Healthcare will have residents with less intensive needs than those requiring care at the nursing home level. The state’s immunization mandate for healthcare workers will still apply to staff, but assisted living residents don’t need as many staff to care for them, according to Maine Health Care Association.

“The needs of residents will not be so acute, and this is by design in Maine,” said Angela Westhoff, president and CEO of the association. “Maine reserves its retirement homes for the sickest of the sick.”

Nursing homes must have one direct care worker for every five residents during the day, one for 10 at night, and one for every 15 residents at night, according to state rules.

“Staffing levels are not the same in assisted living as what is required in nursing homes because the level of care required differs,” Westhoff said.

Colonial Healthcare, Lincoln’s only retirement home, currently has 60 nursing home care beds and 26 assisted living beds. Colonial plans to increase its number of assisted living beds, with memory care as a potential service, Otis-Higgins said. First Atlantic will allow employees affected by the end of nursing home services to work in an assisted living facility in Lincoln or other company facilities, she said.

First Atlantic is working with the state’s Medicaid program to secure a reimbursement rate that allows it to expand assisted living services, according to Otis-Higgins, who described the factors that led to the Colonial changes. as “a catastrophic business failure”.

“We had more leaks in the dike than we had fingers to plug them,” she said.

A number of nursing homes in Maine have converted to assisted living in the past, although these changes occurred before the COVID-19 pandemic. While Lincoln will see the loss of nursing home beds and residents will need to be relocated, it is encouraging that the facility is not closing, Westhoff said.

“The conversion ensures that residents of the community will have access to a viable option of long-term assisted living care,” she said.


Department of Health and Family Services Releases Recommendations for Improving Care Facilities | New


(WSIL) – The Illinois general assembly tasked the Department of Health and Family Services with finding the best way to use pandemic funds to help people in nursing homes.

After 18 months, HFS created a list of recommendations to help improve care.

“Improve the quality of residents in care facilities with a focus on staff. And this, by ensuring that facilities are staffed with the appropriate staff and with the right caliber of staff to ensure that the needs of residents are satisfied, ”said Kelly Cunningham, Medicaid administrator for HFS.

The report found that the pandemic showed a real risk to Medicaid clients in understaffed and overcrowded nursing homes.

That same report found that black and brown customers were disproportionately affected by illness and death.

In addition, at least 40% more black and brown Medicaid clients in nursing facilities have died than expected, based on COVID-19 death rates among white residents of nursing facilities.

To combat these numbers, the HFS recommends incentives to hire more workers at higher wages, allowing establishments to better support residents.

“More money in people’s pockets, better pay, a career ladder and the professionalization of the industry will really help people choose health care as a career,” Cunningham said.

However, the report found that ALL of the understaffed nursing facilities in Illinois are private, for-profit facilities.

And the recommendations are not new rules that all facilities must follow.

“We believe that if adequate staff had been in place and infection control standards had also been in place, much of the suffering or at least some of the suffering could have been avoided. a moral imperative to improve the quality of caring for people, ”Cunningham said.

The HFS will present its report at the fall veto session of the Illinois General Assembly next week.


Biden administrator invests $ 100 million in healthcare workforce shortage


The Biden administration announced Thursday that it will allocate $ 100 million to the National Health Service Corps to help address the shortage of healthcare workers.

Drawn from US bailout funding, the $ 100 million is one of the country’s largest investments in a program that helps place primary care physicians in communities that struggle to recruit and retain them. . That’s a five-fold increase from previous years, the Department of Health and Human Services said.

The National Health Service Corps offers loan repayments and scholarships to clinicians in return for years of service in areas experiencing a shortage of health care providers.

“Whether you are in rural America or in a low-income part of America, that shouldn’t be a reason why you can’t access good quality health care,” the secretary told Health Xavier Becerra during a telephone interview. “And so we want to help the states that are going to try to do what they can to keep this public health workforce in these rural communities, these low income communities, they are where the people need them. “

The announcement comes after the United States lost 17,500 healthcare workers in September, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. With industry employment figures now standing at just under 16 million, the agency reported that the country had lost 524,000 healthcare workers since the start of the pandemic. Job losses in nursing, hospitals and residential care posted the industry’s biggest declines last month.

The loss of employees in turn increased labor costs. Hospitals and other medical facilities have had to sharply increase their spending on recruiting and retaining employees, according to a report released last week by Moody’s Investors Services. This has led to employee benefit options and login bonuses that can go up to five figures since the start of the pandemic.

“Covid has essentially caused a laser focus on the glaring gaps and dysfunctions in the US healthcare system,” said Tener Veenema, an academic specializing in workforce issues at the Center for Health Security at Johns University. Hopkins. “Making investments to redistribute health care providers in rural areas, areas with low resources, is so important because we know how much they suffer from a lack of access to good health care. ”

States will be able to apply for grants until April, and the Department of Health and Human Services plans to award up to 50 grants of up to $ 1 million per year over a four-year period.

Participating states will not have to match funds or share costs in any way to obtain the grants, and they can use 10 percent of the grant for administrative costs.

“With these funds, states can design programs that optimize the selection of disciplines and locations of service, and tailor the length of service engagements to meet the areas most in need in their communities,” said Diana Espinosa, Administrator by Acting Health Resources and Services Administration, which oversees the program. “This investment will have a huge impact on access to primary care and reducing health disparities at a critical time. “

The project start date is only September 2022, so it will not have an immediate effect on the current labor shortage. This, however, represents the latest push by the Biden administration to address the problem which experts say will only worsen over the next decade.

President Joe Biden withdrew $ 100 million this year from the US bailout to support the Medical Reserve Corps, an all-volunteer army of medics, nurses and medical support teams in hopes of picking up the pace vaccinations against Covid-19.

“A hundred million dollars will not be enough for everyone,” Becerra admitted. “But it will certainly help our state partners a lot to provide resources to these local communities, so that they can keep this health worker there, keep them trained, ready and prepared to keep them healthy.”

CORRECTION (October 14, 2021, 3:26 p.m. ET): An earlier version of this article incorrectly stated when states will be able to apply for grants. They can apply until April, not from April.


New Law Requires Certification Of Medical Directors In Qualified Nursing Facilities, Imposes New Reporting Requirements | Hanson Bridgett LLP


Key points

  • Qualified healthcare facilities must ensure that their medical directors are certified within five years of the date of hire or by January 1, 2027, for medical directors already working in an SNF
  • SNFs must declare the certification status of medical director to the CDPH before June 30, 2022
  • SNFs must report changes of medical director to the CDPH within 10 days of the change

As of January 1, 2022, a Qualified Nursing Institution (SNF) will be prohibited from entering into a contract with a medical director unless that person is, or becomes within 5 years, a certified medical director by the American Board of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine (ABPLM) or equivalent organization, as determined by the California Department of Public Health (CDPH).

All independent SNFs are required to report the name and certification status of their medical director to the CDPH by June 30, 2022. For this report, an SNF must submit an HS 215A, curriculum vitae and proof of certification or progress towards certification at CDPH. The HS215A form also requires information regarding criminal history, facility / clinic involvement, and adverse actions. AB 749 requires that a person already employed as a medical director in an SNF be certified before January 1, 2027.

An SNF will also be required to report any change to its medical director within 10 calendar days of the change. When a change occurs, the SNF must submit the appropriate information package to notify the CRPD, including an HS 215A form, curriculum vitae, and proof of certification or progress towards certification.

Institutions applying for SNF accreditation must also submit to the CDPH the HS 215A form, the curriculum vitae of the medical director, the certification status of the medical director and, if not certified, the expected date of certification.

These provisions do not apply to SNFs which operate as a separate part of a hospital (D / P SNF). AD / P SNF must designate a “qualified physician” as medical director. A “qualified physician” is either (1) certified or will be certified as a certified medical director by the ABPLM or (2) board certified in a specialty “consistent with the type of care provided” in the SNF and whose role has been approved by hospital management. AB 749 identifies physical medicine, rehabilitation and pulmonology as examples of certifications acceptable to the board.


Topeka nursing home 100% vaccinated, abandons masks inside

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TOPEKA (KSNT) – Life is finally starting to return to normal at Homestead of Topeka, a long-term care facility. Residents were finally able to remove their masks after having to wear them for more than a year and a half.

All residents and staff of the facility are fully vaccinated, which is why they no longer have to wear masks. They were surprised by the announcement and the residents are delighted. They said the masks created a giant barrier between them and their loved ones.

After removing the masks, they continued with their daily activities but were able to see each other face to face. One activity they participated in was singing a song as a group. A small but monumental moment that represents normalcy for the first time since the start of the pandemic.

Chiefs of staff said they were proud of their residents for coming through the pandemic together.

“COVID has made our situation more like a thunderstorm where we are under this very dark cloud and dancing among the lightning bolts,” said Susan Bullock, executive director of Homestead Assisted Living. “Being able to live this experience as a group, we all row this boat together. “

Guests visiting Homestead of Topeka will still have to go through a small screening process, but as long as they have been fully vaccinated, they do not need to wear masks inside the building.


Status: Three New Guilford County Care Facilities Experiencing COVID-19 Outbreaks | Local News


GREENSBORO – Three Guilford County nursing facilities were newly listed this week in a state report that shows ongoing COVID-19 outbreaks, as well as new cases at other facilities.

Friends Homes in Guilford, Greenhaven Health and Rehabilitation Center and Guilford House have all seen new outbreaks, according to Tuesday’s report from the North Carolina Department of Health and Rehabilitation Services.

Friends Homes had two cases on staff and none involving residents, while Greenhaven had four cases on staff and 10 cases related to residents, according to the report.

Emails seeking comment from these facilities went unanswered Wednesday evening.

Guilford House has had one case among staff and three involving residents, according to the report.

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A Guilford House spokesperson said in an email that during the facility’s weekly COVID-19 testing, he identified three residents and a staff member who tested positive for the virus. All were vaccinated and showed no major symptoms related to the virus, the spokesperson said.

Residents will end their 10-day quarantine period this week. The staff member was sent home and has since completed his quarantine period, she said.

A positive case involving a resident of Accordius Health in Greensboro has been added to the outbreak at that facility, according to the state. The outbreak has affected a total of eight residents and three staff. Two resident deaths have also been reported.


Delaware healthcare facilities to receive $ 75 million to help endowment


Delaware healthcare facilities will receive $ 78 million in federal funds to deal with staff shortages amid the pandemic, Governor John Carney said on Wednesday.

The money, which comes from the American Rescue Pan, is intended for hospitals, long-term care facilities and state-run facilities, officials said. Funding is specifically intended for recruitment and retention efforts for facilities that “face significant staff shortages”.

Carney previously announced that federal funding would go to the Delaware Hospital for the Chronically Ill and other state projects such as sewage, broadband and private sector rehire.

WATCH DOG REPORT:Delaware nurses say they are in crisis. Many fear it will only get worse.

Of that federal funding, Delaware hospitals and long-term care facilities will each receive $ 25 million, while public facilities will receive $ 28 million, a spokesperson for the governor said.

It is not immediately clear how the money will be divided.

Of that federal funding, Delaware hospitals and long-term care facilities will each receive $ 25 million, while public facilities will receive $ 28 million, a spokesperson for the governor said.

The announcement comes after Delaware Online / The News Journal ran an article last month detailing how nurses felt in crisis due to understaffing issues.

These healthcare workers described how many nurses go to work for other hospitals, where healthcare systems offer better wages and significant signing bonuses. Some become itinerant nurses or leave the profession due to burnout and mental health issues.

These staffing issues, healthcare workers say, have caused nurses to treat more patients than many feel are safe, ultimately affecting patient care.

After the article was published, ChristianaCare, Delaware’s largest health care system, acknowledged the article and the “crisis” nurses are facing, according to an email.

“It’s a story that could be written almost anywhere in the country today,” the email read, “as every state’s health systems are strained – and in some places beyond. And yet, for each of our caregivers, the day -the daily challenge is deeply personal.

“After 18 months of the pandemic, it sometimes feels like it’s getting harder – not easier.”

Contact Meredith Newman at (302) 256-2466 or mnewman@delawareonline.com. Follow her on Twitter at @MereNewman.


Vaccination rates for nursing homes vary across the Stateline

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ROCKFORD, Ill. (WIFR) – Nursing homes are caring for the population most vulnerable to coronavirus, but vaccination rates at some Stateline facilities still do not exceed 25%.

“Our primary focus was at the very least to keep COVID away from our residents,” said Helen Dittmer, vice president of Wesley Willows Senior Living Home, responsible for resident engagement.

It’s hard to believe, but Wesley Willows Senior Living Home in Rockford hasn’t had a single case of COVID-19 among his assisted living residents, and a single one in an independent life.

“We did it diligently, wearing the mask, screening our residents and screening our staff,” Dittmer said. “Make sure that visitors who are here have been screened and potentially vaccinated. “

Dittmer said vaccination is not mandatory, but 86 percent of staff, 100 percent of assisted living residents and 98 percent of independent residents are fully immunized.

“It was an overwhelming response,” Dittmer said.

It’s a whole different story for a Stephenson County facility. Currently, 25 percent of staff and 63 percent of residents at Pearl Pavilion are vaccinated. There have been 50 cases of COVID-19 in total there and one resident death.

“It’s disappointing to see a place 25 percent vaccinated,” said Craig Bientema, Stephenson County Public Health Administrator. “It’s just not being responsible.”

Dr Bientema said that while it is good that residents’ vaccination rates are on the rise, it is not enough.

“I would like the staff to be much higher,” Bientema said. “I would love to see all nursing home residents 100 percent or at least above 90 vaccinated.”

Copyright 2021 WIFR. All rights reserved.


The pandemic has seen an exodus of healthcare workers. Here’s how to win them back.


After 18 months on the front lines of the fight against COVID-19, hospital workers have become exhausted and cynical. They show their frustration by stopping in large numbers. This is especially true for nurses. An obvious burnout crisis is upon us. But there are ways to alleviate this crisis. Here’s how to win back healthcare workers:

The COVID-19 pandemic has laid bare that we have an inadequate plan to respond to medical disasters at the federal, state, departmental, municipal and hospital levels. The federal government has rushed in vain to increase supplies of life-saving masks and ventilators. Individual states have faced varying degrees of health worker shortages: doctors and nurses were in short supply in some areas, but in others they remained inactive.

The response to crises at all levels of government must be clearly defined. What’s the plan for another respiratory disease crisis? What other medical crises are possible and what plans are in place to deal with them? These comprehensive preparations should be described annually to all hospital staff to send a clear message to frontline workers that we are ready and supporting them.

Healthcare workers have been significantly affected by the extreme racial and economic inequalities experienced by patients who contracted, suffered and died from COVID-19. We like to think that everyone should have similar access to the resources and basic care necessary to sustain life. But the pandemic has exposed the gross inequality that exists in the United States.

Black Americans were almost four times more likely than whites to die from COVID-19. Black and Hispanic Americans were more likely than whites to contract and be hospitalized for the disease. This sharp disparity in health outcomes is nothing new, but I hope the lessons of the pandemic inspire us to improve equality in health insurance, health outcomes and access to health care. , especially at the primary care level. This will have to be done at the federal level with the cooperation of the states, with the government vested with the power and the money to effect the appropriate changes.

A shortage of nurses had lasted for a decade, but its magnitude was accentuated by the pandemic. In the latest wave of the virus to spread, hospitals facing a shortage of nurses have started shedding beds and refusing surgeries. There are 6,000 nursing vacancies in Louisiana today, and there are 2,000 fewer nurses in Mississippi today than in early 2021.

A 2019 opinion poll by the Association of American Medical Colleges found that 35% of people had difficulty finding a doctor, up 10 percentage points from 2015.

Doctors are also often tied to a single state due to licensing, hampering their ability to see telemedicine patients and respond to a crisis. We need to make a plan to use telemedicine more effectively. We must also end state-level restrictions on medical practice during pandemics. Perhaps more importantly, we need to train more nurses and we need to value them more.

The rapid virulence of COVID-19 has also made it clear that we need to better understand the limits of medicine and what the human body can and must endure. In a 1957 declaration, Pope Pius XII made a very important distinction between ordinary and extraordinary measures. Common measures include dressing a cut or taking an antibiotic for pneumonia. Extraordinary measures include being placed on a ventilator or undergoing experimental chemotherapy. These extraordinary interventions place an enormous burden on the patient, often with only vague assurances of success.

In his speech, Pope Pius XII declared that there is no spiritual obligation to undergo extraordinary measures if they are unsuccessful. Understanding this distinction and having each patient define in a living will a comfort level with extraordinary measures would go a long way in relieving a patient’s end-of-life burdens, often placed on caregivers and hospital staff. Discussions about end-of-life care, while difficult, should take place with family or close friends – and with your family doctor at least once a year.

This last recommendation is the least concrete, but perhaps the most important. Recently, there appears to be a general decline in civility in hospitals. We need to focus on kindness and hope when interacting with caregivers in the hospital. Medicine is an imperfect science, practiced by people we know to be imperfect. There are too many stories today of doctors – and nurses – facing abuse. Doctors often hear “You treat my relative like a guinea pig” or “You ignore my mother and do not care for her”. For nurses, physical violence is common.

Understand that healthcare workers have dedicated their lives to a generous profession. Your fight is our fight. When we return home at the end of the day, we judge ourselves by the healing we have been able to achieve. Think of the hospital for what it is: a place where healing needs to happen in a collaborative and organized way.

Michael J. Stephen is Associate Professor of Medicine at Thomas Jefferson University and Director of the Adult Cystic Fibrosis Center. He is also the author of the recently published book “Breath Taking: The Power, Fragility and Future of Our Extraordinary Lungs”.


What is a hero worth? Nursing home staff say Saginaw council can respond to COVID-19 payments.

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SAGINAW, MI – Some people might call Catherine Davis a hero.

Lately, however, the 60-year-old has said she struggles to feel like one.

Throughout the deadliest times of the pandemic, support staff at Hoyt Nursing and Rehabilitation Center in Saginaw exposed themselves daily to residents suffering – and dying – from the COVID-19 virus. Her job included tasks as simple as folding laundry for the elderly there, and yet “a good day” sometimes just involved surviving an illness that has killed more than 700,000 Americans.

“We have all taken risks on our lives, and we all came home scared to take risks on our family’s lives,” Davis said of her and other support staff in the days. establishments across the country. “The nurses and helpers all worked hard together. We should all be treated like heroes.

Davis will join his colleagues and support staff peers from other nursing homes in Saginaw in calling for a city-funded ‘hero pay’ at the Saginaw City Council meeting on Monday, October 11 at 6 p.m. h 30 at Saginaw Town Hall, 1315 S. Washington.

Organized by the SEIU Healthcare Michigan union which represents 17,000 healthcare workers in the state, nursing home workers plan to make their case during the public comment section of the rally.

The reasoning behind their united front at Saginaw Town Hall: Michigan lawmakers last month approved a state budget that did not include support staff in a pandemic-related pay rise provided to nurses and certified nursing assistants working in the same hazardous environments. Governor Gretchen Whitmer signed state budget backed by $ 2.7 billion in federal COVID-19 funding which, in part, supported a wage increase of $ 2.35 per hour for direct care workers.

With members of Saginaw City Council holding the purse strings on its own piece of federal COVID-19 aid – $ 52 million in American Rescue Plan Act stimulus funding, to be precise – Davis and his colleagues hope local elected officials will reward nursing home support staff in a way heads of state have not.

Members of the support staff group did not indicate the amount of money they expected to receive.

Last month, Saginaw city council members hosted the first in a series of public strategy sessions that they believe will help them decide how to spend the stimulus before it expires in 2026. Although the council has not specifically addressed ideas related to nursing home support staff, this first collection of ideas generated, including the relief of healthcare workers.

Nicole Flores, a housekeeper who also works at the Hoyt Nursing and Rehab Center, hoped the council would choose her and her peers for part of the pandemic relief fund.

“We are essential and we deserve a raise,” said Flores. “Saginaw City Council has the opportunity to be a leader and show the rest of the state how we should value and support essential workers.”

Nursing homes were a particularly dangerous environment around this time last year. With older populations at high risk of death from the pandemic, nursing homes suffered substantial losses ahead of the rollout of the COVID-19 vaccine which began in December 2020.

The deaths have extended to staff caring for residents of these sites.

A statewide database shows, in Michigan long-term care facilities, there have been 80 staff fatalities; 69 of these deaths occurred before March 2021.

There have been 25,397 reported cases of COVID-19 among staff at these same sites, including 70 cases reported to the Hoyt Nursing and Rehab Center.

“Support staff like me worked through this pandemic because we knew our residents needed us,” Flores said.

“We risked our lives walking into COVID rooms, cleaning, cooking, doing laundry, responding to patient call lights. We did whatever was necessary. This is why it was so upsetting to hear that when the state renewed a pandemic pay rise for direct care providers in nursing homes, they did not include staff from support like me. “

While daily COVID-19 cases are drastically down from the pre-vaccine environment, the number of long-term care facilities statewide is on the rise again in recent weeks after a summer relatively soft. For example, during a 7-day period in June 2021, two cases of COVID-19 from nursing home staff were reported statewide, compared with 352 cases reported during the week of September 29. to October 6.

Because the pandemic remains dangerous, frontline workers continue to deserve additional financial reimbursement for this risk, Davis said.

“We’re out there doing what we need to do to make things work,” she said.

“Everyone who worked during the pandemic deserves something more. If you want to call us heroes, we must be treated like heroes.

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Update on Top 10 and Top 10 Medical Qualified Nursing Facilities Ranked by Staff Immunization Rate


CORRECTION: An earlier version of this press release omitted three nursing facilities with 99% of staff with at least one COVID-19 vaccine: Montgomery Village Health Care Center, Waldorf Center, and Patapsco Valley Center. In addition, the lists of three nursing facilities were updated: Citizens Care and Rehabilitation Center in Frederick – 100%, Salisbury Rehabilitation and Nursing Center – 98%, and Autumn Lake Healthcare in Glade Valley – 97%.

Media contact:

Deidre McCabe, Director, Communications Office, 410-767-3536

Andy Owen, Assistant Director, Media Relations, 410-767-6491

Update on Maryland’s Top 10 and Top 10 Qualified Nursing Facilities Ranked by Staff Immunization Rate

Maryland Department of Health also announces six facilities that failed to submit adequate data required

Baltimore, Maryland – The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) today announced an update on the top 10 and last 10 skilled nursing facilities in the state, ranked by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a vaccine against COVID-19. MDH also announced an update on skilled nursing facilities that failed to submit adequate COVID-19 vaccination data for staff, as required by the state.

Through vaccination protocols in force since September 1, 2021, all staff in healthcare facilities must have their first or only dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Health care facilities that do not follow vaccination protocols or do not correctly report their vaccination data are subject to fines, civil penalties and enforcement measures.

Each week, the Maryland Department of Aging publishes data on residents and staff vaccinated against COVID-19 at each of the state’s skilled nursing facilities on its Qualified Nursing Facility Immunization Dashboard.

“Over the past ten weeks, the percentage of staff in state health care facilities who are vaccinated with at least one dose against COVID-19 has increased by 10.1%,” said MDH Secretary Dennis R Schrader. “In addition, the vast majority of healthcare facilities now report their data on time and are in compliance. “

“The handful of health care facilities in the state that still have a significant number of employees unvaccinated against COVID-19 put the health of vaccinated staff and residents at risk,” said Rona E. Kramer, secretary of the Maryland Department of Aging. “We will continue to impose sanctions on them until they comply.”

The 10 Best Nursing Homes and Skilled Gathering Facilities in Maryland

classified by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

  1. St. Mary’s Nursing Center = 100 percent

Fairland Center = 100 percent

St. Elizabeth Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 100 percent

Collingswood Rehabilitation and Health Care Center = 100 percent

Sagepoint Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 100 percent

Overlea Health and Rehabilitation Center = 100 percent

The Fall Ridge in North Oaks = 100 percent

Bethesda Coach Hill = 100 percent

Bedford Court Care Center = 100 percent

Franklin Woods Center = 100 percent

Maplewood Park Square = 100 percent

Brighton Gardens from Tuckerman Lane = 100 percent

Fahrney-Keedy Memorial House = 100 percent

Maryland Baptist Aged Home = 100 percent

Frederick Citizens Care and Rehabilitation Center = 100 percent

Broadmead = 100 percent

Place du parc Roland = 100 percent

  1. Friends’ retirement home = 99 percent

Edenwald retirement community = 99 percent

Hammonds Lane Center = 99 percent

Keswick Multiple Care Center = 99 percent

Lorien Bulle Rock = 99 percent

Wilson Health Care Center = 99 percent

Bethesda Health and Rehabilitation = 99 percent

Doctors Community rehabilitation and patient care = 99 percent

Villa Rosa Nursing and rehabilitation = 99 percent

Sligo Creek Center = 99 percent

Hebrew House of Greater Washington = 99 percent

Glen Meadows Retirement Community = 99 percent

Fox Chase Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 99 percent

Montgomery Village Health Center = 99 percent

Waldorf Center = 99 percent

Patapsco Valley Center = 99 percent

  1. Autumn Lake Health Care at Cherry Lane = 98 percent

Augsburg village = 98 percent

The Solomons of Asbury = 98 percent

Salisbury Rehabilitation and Nursing Center = 98 percent

Bel Pré Health Center = 98 percent

Masonic Houses of Maryland = 98 percent

Forestville Health Center = 98 percent

South River Health Center = 98 percent

The village of Rockville = 98 percent

Advantageous house = 98 percent

Saint-Joseph Nursing = 98 percent

  1. Post-acute care center = 97 percent

Chesapeake Future Care = 97 percent

Northampton Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 97 percent

Resorts in Chester River Manor = 97 percent

Pleasant View Retirement Home = 97 percent

Manor Care Health Services – Potomac = 97 percent

Fall Lake Health Care in Glade Valley = 97 percent

Forest Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 97 percent

Transitional care services at Mercy Medical Center = 97 percent

Moran Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 97 percent

  1. Pineview Future Care = 96 percent

Manor Care Health Services – Chevy Chase = 96 percent

Chestnut Green Blakehurst Health Center = 96 percent

Ingleside at King Farm = 96 percent

Hillhaven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 96 percent

Brooke Grove Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 96 percent

Ridgeway Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 96 percent

  1. Lutheran Villager of Carroll = 95 percent

Copper crest = 95 percent

Rockville Retirement Home = 95 percent

Levindale Geriatric Center and Hebrew Hospital = 95 percent

Arcola Health and Rehabilitation Center = 95 percent

Brinton Woods Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 95 percent

Frederick Villa Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 95 percent

Fairhaven = 95 percent

Lorien Health Systems – Colombia = 95 percent

Allegany Health Nursing and Rehabilitation = 95 percent

Lorien Health Systems Mt. Airy = 95 percent

North Arundel Health and Rehabilitation Center = 95 percent

Crescent Cities Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 95 percent

Manor Care Health Services – Silver Spring = 95 percent

  1. Miller’s Grant Lutheran Village = 94 percent

Fall Lake Health Care in Chestertown = 94 percent

Heron Point from Chestertown = 94 percent

Marley Neck Health and Rehabilitation Center = 94 percent

Fall Lake Health Care at Spa Creek = 94 percent

Buckingham’s choice = 94 percent

  1. Rehabilitation and health care in the Potomac Valley = 93 percent

Restore health rehabilitation center = 93 percent

Julia Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 93 percent

The house of the Sacred Heart = 93 percent

Summit Park Health and Rehabilitation Center = 93 percent

  1. Subacute unit of the Center hospitalier du Nord-Ouest = 92 percent

Greater Baltimore Medical Center Subacute Care Unit = 92 percent

Northwestern Health Center = 92 percent

Manor Care Health Services – Adelphi = 92 percent

  1. Ravenwood Nursing Center = 91 percent

Homewood at Crumland Farms = 91 percent

Fall Lake Health Care at Homewood = 91 percent

Future Care Old Court = 91 percent

Mennonite House of Goodwill = 91 percent

Glen Burnie Health and Rehabilitation Center = 91 percent

Lorien Belair Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 91 percent

The last 10 skilled nursing homes and assembly facilities in Maryland

classified by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

  1. Fall Lake Health Care in Chesapeake Woods = 49 percent

  2. Brightwood Powerback Campus Rehabilitation = 52 percent

Cumberland Health Center = 52 percent

  1. Dennett Road Manor = 56 percent

  2. Calvert Manor Rehabilitation and Health Center = 60 percent

Complete Treatments at Corsica Hills = 60 percent

  1. Vindobona Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 61 percent

Coffman retirement home = 61 percent

  1. Ministries of Saint Joseph = 62 percent

  2. Sterling Care in the village of Frostburg = 63 percent

  3. Anchorage Health Center = 64 percent

  4. Charlotte Hall Veterans’ House = 65 percent

  5. Fall Lake Health Care in Parkville = 66 percent

Nursing home and skilled assembly facilities in Maryland

who did not submit adequate data on personnel vaccinated against COVID-19

  1. Regency treatment of Silver Spring

  2. Autumn Lake Health Care at Bridgepark

  3. Althea Woodland retirement home

  4. Oak Manor Health and Rehabilitation Center

  5. Future Care Capital Region

  6. Irvington Future Care

For more information on CRISP nursing home reporting requirements, please see this transmission to all administrators of retirement homes. Institutions are required to report certain information themselves on a weekly or daily basis.

For establishments with questions about the data reported for their establishment, send an email mdh.snfdata@maryland.gov.

For the most recent data on Maryland COVID-19, visit coronavirus.maryland.gov.

To schedule a COVID-19 vaccination appointment or see if you are eligible for a Pfizer COVID-19 booster, visit covidvax.maryland.gov. To find a place to take a COVID-19 test, visit covidtest.maryland.gov.

– ### –

The Maryland Department of Health is dedicated to protecting and enhancing the health and safety of all people in Maryland through disease prevention, access to care, quality management, and commitment community.

follow us on Twitter @MDHealthDept and to Facebook.com/MDHealthDept.



Nursing facilities must weather the Medicare Advantage ‘reimbursement storm’


With Medicare Advantage earnings “significantly lower” than fee-for-service, new analysis from Zimmet Healthcare Services Group finds, qualified nursing facilities must weather today’s “reimbursement storm” in order to meet the challenge. to the incoming wave of baby boomers who need installation services.

In the meantime, Zimmet suggests operators use plant data to improve AD performance.

“Most MA applications were submitted by SNFs with at least a three-star rating, but in areas with less bed saturation, two stars were not uncommon,” the report said. “There was no correlation between the 5-star rating and episodic earnings, while the 30-day hospital readmission rate explained less than 20% of the variation in payment.”

NFCs with best results and low costs can market their ‘value proposition’ to MA plans using benchmarking, county-level metrics offered through Zimmet’s CORE Analytics through its Medicare Advantage Post-Acute eXchange (MAPAX) .

MAPAX, which was launched in April, compares MA performance on a “local peer group” basis, taking into account market-based revenue and value metrics.

“Providers know very little about their Medicare Advantage performance, specifically market capture levels, then revenue and results in a specific market,” said Vincent Fedele, partner and chief analytics officer at Zimmet. “We’re trying to neutralize and level the playing field in this regard, and publish the information on the Medicare grant side, based on our own proprietary dataset for incoming claims.”

Operators could then compare their revenues and results to other facilities of the same size and market.

“There is a lot of data available for Medicare’s service charge (FFS). There are companies that sell this data for a lot of money – there is hardly any on Medicare Advantage, ”added Marc Zimmet, CEO of the consulting firm. “When nursing homes are negotiating or dealing with Medicare Advantage plans and the rates are very low, the nursing homes could call the Medicare Advantage plan and try to get the rates increased… we have these metrics to really quantify the costs. performance of installations.

CORE is the consulting firm’s software data company; analysts get relevant data directly from SNF complaints submitted to the company. Fedele said the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS), or any other governing body, does not publish this type of data.

“We’re joking that insurance companies are going to hate this product because it sheds light on this data black hole so well,” Zimmet said. “Insurance plans have all the information, but they don’t share it.

CORE has received submissions from over 3,000 qualified nursing facilities in 49 states since its inception in October 2019 – these submissions represent over 30% of all SNF Medicare Part A claims nationally.

For MAPAX, 1,000 of these suppliers downloaded MA SNF complaints from March 1 to August 31 of this year. Zimmet hopes that most of CORE’s 3,000 users will be engaged and contribute to its flagship product MAPAX by early next year.


Once hailed as heroes, healthcare workers now face a wave of violence


This is a story from Kaiser Health News.

The emergency department at San Leandro Hospital, where nurse Mawata Kamara works, entered detention recently when a visitor, agitated at being prevented from seeing a patient due to covid-19 restrictions, threatened bring a gun to the California facility.

It was not the first time the ministry faced a gun threat during the pandemic. Earlier in the year, a well-known psychiatric patient in the department became increasingly violent, spitting racial slurs, spitting at staff and throwing punches before threatening to shoot Kamara in the face.

“Violence has always been a problem,” Kamara said. “This pandemic has really only added a magnifying glass. “

In the early days of the pandemic, nightly celebrations praised the bravery of frontline healthcare workers. Eighteen months later, these same workers say they are experiencing an alarming increase in violence in their workplaces.

A nurse testified before a Georgia Senate review committee in September that she was attacked by a patient so badly last spring that she landed in the emergency room of her own hospital.

At the Research Medical Center in Kansas City, Missouri, security was called to the COVID unit, nurse Jenn Caldwell said, when a visitor shouted aggressively at nurses about his wife’s condition, which was a patient.

In Missouri, a tripling of physical assaults on nurses prompted Cox Medical Center Branson to issue panic buttons that can be worn on employee ID badges.

Hospital leaders were already sensitive to workplace violence before the pandemic struck. But the stress of covid has exacerbated the problem, they say, resulting in increased security, de-escalation training and calls for civility. And while many hospitals struggle to fix the problem on their own, nurses and other workers are pushing federal legislation to create nationally enforceable standards.

Paul Sarnese, an executive at Virtua Health in New Jersey and president of the International Association for Safety and Security in Healthcare, said numerous studies show healthcare workers are much more likely to be victimized aggravated assaults than workers in any other sector.

Federal data shows healthcare workers suffered 73% of all non-fatal workplace violence injuries in the United States in 2018. It is too early to have full statistics on the pandemic.

Despite this, Michelle Wallace, chief nurse at Grady Health System in Georgia, said the violence is likely even higher because many victims of patient assaults do not report it.

“We say, ‘It’s part of our job,” said Wallace, who is pushing for more reporting.

Caldwell said she had been a nurse for less than three months the first time she was assaulted at work – a patient spat at her. Over the next four years, she estimated, she spent no more than three months without being verbally or physically assaulted.

“I wouldn’t say it’s planned, but it’s accepted,” Caldwell said. “We have a lot of people with mental health issues coming through our doors. “

Jackie Gatz, vice president of safety and preparedness at the Missouri Hospital Association, said a lack of behavioral health resources can spur violence as patients seek treatment for mental health issues and disorders related to substance use in emergencies. Life can also spill over inside the hospital, with episodes of violence that started outside continuing inside or the presence of law enforcement officers exacerbating tensions.

A February 2021 report from National Nurses United – a union in which Kamara and Caldwell are representatives – offers another possible factor: staffing levels that don’t give workers enough time to recognize and defuse potentially volatile situations.

Nurses in the COVID unit have also taken on additional responsibilities during the pandemic. Tasks such as feeding patients, drawing blood, and cleaning rooms would typically be done by other hospital staff, but nurses got involved in these tasks to minimize the number of workers visiting negative pressure rooms where patients were covid patients are treated. As the workload has increased, the number of patients supervised by each nurse remains unchanged, leaving little time to hear the worries of frightened visitors for the well-being of loved ones – like the man who screamed aggressively on the nurses on Caldwell’s unit.

In September, 31% of hospital nurses surveyed by this union said they had been victims of violence at work, up from 22% in March.

Dr Bryce Gartland, president of the Atlanta-based Emory Healthcare hospital group, said the violence had escalated as the pandemic continued, especially during the latest wave of infections, hospitalizations and deaths.

“Frontline healthcare workers and first responders have been on the battlefield for 18 months,” Garland said. “They are exhausted.

Like the increase in violence on airplanes, in sports arenas and at school board meetings, growing tensions inside hospitals may reflect growing tensions outside.

William Mahoney, president of Cox Medical Center Branson, said national political anger is playing out locally, especially when staff members ask people entering the hospital to put on masks.

“People have different political views – they’re either CNN or Fox News – and they start yelling at you, yelling at you,” Mahoney said.

Caldwell, the Kansas City nurse, said the physical nature of covid infections may contribute to an increase in violence. Patients in the covid unit often have dangerously low oxygen levels.

“When that happens, they get confused and also extremely combative,” Caldwell said.

Sarnese said the pandemic has given hospitals an opportunity to review their safety protocols. For example, limiting entry points to allow covid screening allows hospitals to channel visitors past security cameras.

Research Medical Center recently hired additional security guards and provided de-escalation training to supplement its video surveillance, spokeswoman Christine Hamele said.

In Branson, Mahoney Hospital has beefed up its security staff, installed cameras around the facility, brought in dogs (“people don’t really want to swing you when there’s a German Shepherd sitting there”) and organized de-escalation training – in addition to panic buttons.

Some of these efforts predate the pandemic, but the covid crisis has added urgency to an industry that is already struggling to recruit employees and maintain adequate staffing levels. “The number one question that started to be asked is, ‘Are you going to protect me?’” Said Mahoney.

While several states, including California, have rules to tackle violence in hospitals, National Nurses United calls on the US Senate to pass Workplace Violence Prevention Act for healthcare and human service workers , which would force hospitals to adopt plans to prevent violence.

“With any standard, at the end of the day you need it to be enforced,” said union industrial hygienist Rocelyn de Leon-Minch.

Nurses in states with existing laws still face violence, but they have an enforceable standard they can refer to when requesting that this violence be addressed. De Leon-Minch said the federal bill, which passed the House in April, seeks to extend that protection to healthcare workers nationwide.

Destiny, the nurse who testified in Georgia using only her first name, files a complaint against the patient who assaulted her. The state Senate committee is now considering legislation for next year.

Kamara said the recent violence had helped her hospital provide de-escalation training, although she was not happy with it. San Leandro Hospital spokeswoman Victoria Balladares said the hospital had not seen an increase in workplace violence during the pandemic.

For healthcare workers like Kamara, all of this antagonism towards them is a far cry from the early days of the pandemic, when hospital workers were widely hailed as heroes.

“I don’t want to be a hero,” Kamara said. “I want to be a mom and a nurse. I want to be seen as a person who has chosen a career that she loves, and she deserves to go to work and do it in peace. And not to feel like they’re going to be hurt.

Kaiser Health News is a non-profit news service covering health issues. This is an independent editorial program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, which is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.


Onondaga County weighs mitigation measures, monitors nursing homes as high COVID-19 infection rates persist

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Onondaga County will consider additional mitigation measures for COVID-19 if the number of cases does not flatten out soon. But county manager Ryan McMahon wouldn’t say what they could do. Central New York City has one of the highest 7-day positive rates in the state, and Gov. Hochul has hinted she may take action. McMahon explains that even entire countries with severe restrictions have not been able to reduce the numbers.

“We’re looking at a few things we can do if this doesn’t smooth out. We will probably give him a little more time because the weather gives us a little more. We definitely need this thing flattened before the indoor season. “

McMahon says that a third of cases are due to home exposure, which is virtually impossible to prevent. Otherwise, he says mask warrants are already in place at gathering places like schools and daycares, but they are difficult to enforce. McMahon says he’s very concerned about clusters of cases in two nursing homes, which require masks and have some of the highest vaccination rates for residents and staff. The state is also investigating. He is concerned about the implications for facility staff and for home care.

Right now, from what I understand, nursing homes are not accepting a lot of new residents because of the challenges they face. This puts a lot of pressure on your ecosystem and your home care infrastructure. We’re monitoring this a lot and really trying to see what this challenge might look like. “

McMahon says the healthcare workforce is stretched and fatigued, limiting options for families. Meanwhile, some school districts are struggling with staff shortages due to COVID-related quarantines and isolation. A school in Liverpool had to switch to distance learning for this reason. Otherwise, McMahon says the students should stay in the classroom.

“If people need to get away for a while because they don’t have enough teachers, that makes sense. To suggest now, when active cases are 15-20 percent of our peak, when we had kids in school, that [they go remote] as a risk-based approach, we strongly disagree. Data doesn’t deserve this.

He says the expected emergency approval of the Pfizer vaccine for 5 to 11 year olds, hopefully around Halloween, should bring cases down. The same goes for booster injections. The county is once again partnering with Kinney Drugs for a recall clinic Thursday, Oct. 14 from 9 to 4 at the Oncenter. Registration is required at ongov.net.


Two local health workers receive awards from Samaritan Hospital | WWTI


WATERTOWN, NY (WWTI) – Samaritan Medical Center congratulates two local women on receiving the hospital’s DAISY Award and BEE Award.

According to a press release from the hospital, the DAISY Award for Extraordinary Nurses recognizes exemplary nurses at the hospital and all outpatient clinics, and the BEE Award honors other outstanding staff who support patient care. patients. On October 8, Samaritan named two women from the region as the recipients of the September award.

According to the hospital, Sharon Gamble, who is a licensed practical nurse at Clayton Family Health Center, received the DAISY Award for her decades of empathy, care and dedication to Samaritan and his patients. His nomination letter went on to explain why Gamble deserved the honor.

“[Sharon] welcomes every meeting with a warm welcome and makes you feel like you are the only patient there, ”reads her letter of appointment. “She remembers personal events you have discussed on other visits and keeps track of not only your medical needs, but also personal and family events, which in turn creates such an individualized and caring outlook. Sharon is definitely a deserving DAISY! ”

The award is supported internationally by the DAISY Foundation and presents its recipients with a certificate congratulating them on being an extraordinary nurse, a DAISY Award pin, and a hand-carved sculpture titled “A Healer’s Touch.” A larger version of the symbolic sculpture is on display in the Samaritan Healing Gardens, which was made possible through funds donated by the Samaritan Auxiliary.

Nursing Assistant, Rhonda VanOrman received the BEE Award for her hardworking, compassionate and contagious attitude. In honor of the award, she received a certificate, a BEE Award pin and a gift bag along with other tokens of gratitude. Her appointment further explained how her positive attitude impacts her colleagues and patients.

“Rhonda is generally carefree and doesn’t hesitate to tell others how much she enjoys her job, what she does and how she has the ability to make a positive impact for those who need our health care.” , we read in his appointment. . “Rhonda shows dedication to Samaritan. She is full of empathy and responsibility. She certainly deserves this BEE recognition because she is so vital to patient recovery… we need more Rhondas.

Both awards will continue to be presented throughout the year, and nominations can be submitted by patients, families or colleagues at any time. More information about the DAISY and BEE awards and application materials can be found on the Samaritan website.


Nursing home worker recounts horrors of warehouse evacuation and denounces owner

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NEW ORLEANS (WVUE) – It took her aunt six months to move into the retirement home where Janice Verdin worked, but she says her Aunt Marie started dancing again.

“I like having her there because I could watch her closely,” Verdin said.

Verdin would end up watching his aunt very closely as they evacuated to an Independence warehouse for Hurricane Ida along with hundreds of others.

“Every time we walked in he would come in and you would see the mattresses on the floor which were the first red flag for me, it was bright 24/7. The locals are crying for help, this is probably the worst, they have been dirty for so long and there is nothing to be done. We should never have been placed in a warehouse in these conditions with porta with only four sinks for washing hands and no COVID protocol in place, it should never have happened, ”said Verdin.

According to her, the only positive point was to distract her aunt from crowded quarters.

“Start singing a song like you’re happy and you know it because I knew it would piss her off and she laughs,” Verdin said.

Verdin is one of dozens of nurses suing owner Bob Dean, claiming he cut their paychecks after working around the clock during the evacuation.

She says at the end of the day it’s not about the money.

“We are entrusted with taking care of these residents. If a storm hits we will get them to a safe place where they have everything they need, I kinda feel my dog’s kennel was better than the one we were placed in, I take care of my animal is morally better than he thinks to take care of us and the residents, ”said Verdin.

“The reasons they gave for revoking the license are false and they will not be able to prove them in a trial that they are not justified,” said John McLindon.

Already facing several lawsuits, Dean’s lawyers have also filed an appeal to reinstate his nursing home licenses withdrawn by the Department of Health following the warehouse incident.

“He and his staff are in a very quick situation and quite honestly they did a hell of a good job in light of everything that was going on, so I don’t think they have the right to vote these licenses out. they just did. I think they have overstepped their limits; I think they rushed their judgment here, ”McLindon said.

“I just hope he doesn’t get his licenses back, that would be a big mistake,” Verdin said.

Returning home from the warehouse, Verdin says her grief continued when her Aunt Marie contracted and died from COVID.

“Part of me wishes we hadn’t put her in the nursing home because now, six months later, she’s gone,” Verdin said.

She says the nurses did all they could in this warehouse, now vowing to make sure no one else was going through this.

“There is no excuse for knowing where we were, but there is no excuse, there is no way he could justify this… I could look him in the face and say absolutely no”, a said Verdin.

Verdin said it wasn’t the only time the dean had failed in his eyes to safely evacuate the residents of the nursing home. She said the same thing happened in 2008 at a Winn Dixie.

Dean’s attorney says they aim to have a trial before a panel of judges to reinstate his licenses.

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Hospitals are spending more money to hire and retain healthcare workers during the pandemic. It’s bad for their margins.


Hospitals face staffing shortages made worse by the COVID-19 pandemic, and Wall Street analysts are increasingly concerned that not having enough workers to staff these facilities will squeeze margins.

“The increase in COVID-19 cases due to the delta variant continues to exacerbate the hospital staff shortage, hampering recruitment and retention, driving up salaries and dragging down hospital profitability,” Moody’s Investors said on Tuesday. Service. “Over the next year, we expect margins to decline given wage inflation, the use of expensive nursing agencies, increased recruitment and retention efforts, and expanded benefits that include more behavioral health services and offers such as childcare. ”

There are several issues involved.

Nurses and doctors have been scarce in some parts of the country for years. Many are exhausted and after 20 months of the pandemic some are choosing to retire or resign. (A recent survey of 6,000 critical care nurses found that 66% have considered stopping nursing due to the pandemic.)

“There is no doubt that the job market has been under pressure for some time, given COVID activity,” William Rutherford, CFO of HCA Healthcare Inc. HCA,
+ 0.03%,
one of the largest hospital chains in the United States, said at the Morgan Stanley Healthcare Conference last month, according to a FactSet transcript of the presentation.

Then came the delta variant and an increase in hospitalizations which increased the demand for nurses, in particular, to treat COVID-19 patients.

Many hospitals have had to limit or stop elective procedures considered essential to their financial success in order to focus their resources on these patients.

That includes Intermountain Healthcare, Utah’s largest hospital system, which in mid-September began postponing all elective procedures at 13 nonprofit hospitals, citing a lack of beds. That same week, Idaho began allowing hospitals to ration care, citing “the massive increase in COVID-19 patients requiring hospitalization in all parts of the state.”

“In parts of the United States, hospitals have suspended elective night surgeries due not only to an increase in the number of cases, but also to insufficient staff, resulting in loss of revenue,” the analysts wrote. from Moody’s in the report.

And, finally, some workers have decided to resign or be fired rather than comply with the COVID-19 vaccination mandates implemented by some health organizations.

Add all of these factors together, then consider that salaries and benefits are typically up to half of a hospital’s total expenses.

Hospitals must now pay workers more, including by hiring more expensive temporary or itinerant nurses; spend more on employee benefits and other retention “perks”; and increase the amount of money they invest in recruiting clinical talent. (This is a good thing for healthcare staffing companies like AMN Healthcare Services Inc. AMN,
+ 0.47%
and Cross Country Healthcare Inc. CCRN,
+ 2.47%,
analysts say.)

“When COVID outbreaks occur, hospital beds are primarily allocated to COVID patients and non-COVID admissions are postponed,” Jefferies analysts wrote this week in a note to investors on nonprofit hospitals . “As we come out of the delta’s rise, we believe the demand for temporary nurses will decline from current levels but remain high (placement rates lower than current averages) as admissions and procedures deferred. are reprogrammed. “

The delta’s surge is decreasing and the number of new cases, hospitalizations and deaths is decreasing. The current seven-day average for COVID-19-related hospitalizations is 7,271 as of Friday, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. That’s already lower than last week’s 8,378-day average, but that doesn’t mean all hospitals are out of the woods yet.

“Even as average daily COVID hospitalizations decline, we continue to see many hospitals and intensive care units across the country at full capacity,” CDC director Rochelle Walensky said in a Home briefing on Wednesday. White.

Learn more about related MarketWatch coverage:

New York healthcare workers who are fired for refusing to get vaccinated are not eligible for unemployment benefits, in most cases

‘You have to do the right thing’: 50 healthcare groups ask employers to demand COVID vaccines for workers – but big hurdle remains

Court Confirms Houston Hospital’s Compulsory COVID-19 Vaccination Policy: “Every Job Has Limits To Worker Behavior”


Aryans Institute Gets Green Light from INC to Start B Sc Nursing Course


Excelsior correspondent
JAMMU, October 7: Indian Nursing Council (INC), New Delhi, authorized the Aryan Institute of Nursing, Rajpura, near Chandigarh, to launch B Sc Nursing with a membership of 50 seats.
Approval has been given to teach Nursing B course from session 2021-22 under letter number 18-26 / 8714-INC / 15875 of September 6, 2021.
Dr Anshu Kataria, chairman of Aryans Group, said doctors and nurses are on the front lines of the response to COVID-19. Forced to cope with limited staff, hospitals across the country are struggling to provide adequate care for coronavirus patients. According to reports, the net change in post-COVID 2018-2030 employment for healthcare professionals will be around 112 percent, he added.
He added that the nurse-to-population ratio is 1: 670 versus the norm of 1: 300, according to the Department of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW). Keeping in mind, this course has started among the Aryans as the demand for nursing professionals in the post Covid-19 scenario is expected to increase in the coming years, he explained.

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North Carolina health care visit measurement heads to governor


RALEIGH, NC (AP) – Hospitals, nursing homes, and adult and hospice care facilities in North Carolina would be required to allow patient visits to a measure that received final legislative approval on Wednesday .

The bill is the result of complaints from voters last year about the inability of family members to visit loved ones in person during the COVID-19 pandemic.

The Senate voted unanimously for the compromise measure, two weeks after the House voted for the bill.

The measure is now heading to Gov. Roy Cooper’s office, according to which visits should be permitted to the extent federal law permits. Compassionate visits, such as when the patient’s relative dies, should also be allowed.

State health officials are reportedly fining a health care facility $ 500 that violates this policy and fails to fix the problem.

The bill, titled “No Patient Left Alone Act,” marks the latest approved measure that addresses barriers to visitor access that surfaced during the pandemic.

Cooper recently enacted bills that would require hospitals to allow a member of the clergy to visit a patient and ask health regulators to establish visiting policies for them by next year. nursing homes and adult care homes in a declared emergency.


As nursing home staff immunization rates remain low, advocates push for federal mandate

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Officials in the Biden administration announced in August that long-term care staff are expected to get vaccinated soon, but the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) have yet to implement the policy. Meanwhile, the vaccination rate among long-term care workers nationwide is languishing at just over 65%.

“The federal mandate has been well received, but the lack of direction is concerning,” said Michael Wasserman, former president of the California Association for Long Term Care Medicine and a member of the California Vaccine Advisory Committee. “Having unvaccinated staff caring for residents will lead to transmission of the virus and therefore death. “

“We can’t implement this soon enough,” Wasserman said. “Every day that passes without a guide will inevitably result in more deaths.”

In August, John Knox Village in Missouri was among the vendors who were awaiting further guidance from CMS before taking further action, so that they could fully understand exactly what the mandate entails. Two months later, they are still awaiting further guidance.

John Knox Village spokeswoman Emily Banyas told ABC News that in the meantime, the facility is continuing its voluntary vaccination clinics every two weeks. The vaccination rate for facility staff is up 5% from last month, but is still only around 65%.

Overall, only about half of the staff at long-term care facilities in Missouri had been fully immunized as of September 19, according to the latest data available from CMS, making Missouri one of the least immunized states in the country.

In Oklahoma, where the staff vaccination rate is 51.7%, a long-term care manager told ABC News she hopes the federal mandate will increase staff vaccination rates, especially in areas rural. Mary Brinkley, executive director of the Oklahoma chapter of the seniors’ advocacy group LeadingAge, said that meanwhile, providers in rural areas are making a concerted effort to increase their voluntary vaccination rates, with some operators of homes in nursing reaching rates of 80-95%.

But in Montana, where the staff vaccination rate is 59.8%, the federal mandate may be the only way for the state to see a big increase in employee vaccinations. Due to a state law that prohibits employers from requiring vaccinations, Montana Health Care Association executive director Rose Hughes said unless a federal mandate is implemented to create an exception for long-term care providers, there is “nothing else they can do” “constantly try to convince staff to get immunized through education and information.”

However, Hughes also told ABC News that she expects a “significant number” of employees to resign when the federal mandate takes effect. Some facilities have already reported loss of personnel amid the looming order, Hughes said.

In Kentucky, where the vaccination rate among long-term care staff is only 56.2%, a spokesperson for the Kentucky Association of Health Care Facilities said despite concerns over possible resignations of the staff, the organization supports employers’ vaccination mandates and hopes that Biden’s tenure will result in a significant increase in COVID-19 vaccinations among staff.

As of September 19, about a month after the Biden administration announced its intention to require long-term care facilities to immunize their staff or lose Medicare and Medicaid benefits, the vaccination rate of the national staff only increased by 4.3%, from 61.1% to 65.4%. , according to CMS data. The previous month it had risen 2.5%.

Eric Carlson, a long-term care expert with advocacy group Justice in Aging, says the mandate is necessary “to prevent deaths and to keep care facilities open to visitors.”

Lisa Sanders, national spokesperson for LeadingAge, said it was “very likely” that an increase in workplace vaccination mandates would lead to an overall increase in the vaccination rate.

“What we need now – urgently – is both the rule and the guidelines for implementation,” she said.

In Tennessee, where the staff immunization rate is just under 54%, Tennessee Health Care Association spokesperson Jay Moore told ABC News that while a few long-term care facilities have voluntarily imposed their own mandate, many providers wait for national guidelines because “the landscape changes so quickly, and there will always be unexpected nuances when CMS rules are finally enacted.”

“CMS is hopefully just trying to get it right,” Moore said.


Local Nursing Home Holds COVID-19 Vaccine Booster Clinic for Residents and Staff | Coronavirus

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REINBECK, Iowa (KWWL) – Parkview Manor Nursing Home hosted a vaccination clinic for COVID-19 booster shots on Wednesday to protect those most vulnerable from the virus.

The elderly and nursing home staff are among the group eligible for the third dose. The two populations were also among the groups that were the first eligible to be vaccinated.

When vaccines were first made available, clinics were common in nursing homes around the world, but a few months ago the federal program that led those efforts announced it would not do the same goes for booster shots. It is up to individual retirement homes to pay for and administer the third dose to their residents and staff.

“It’s for the residents. It’s for our community, ”said Sean Schafer, Director of Nursing for Parkview Manor.

Those at Reinbeck nursing home rolled up their sleeves and got their third shot against COVID-19. Many received their first round of vaccines in January as they were one of the first groups eligible for the drug.

“It’s just another layer of security that we have for them,” said Scott Kramer, administrator of Parkview Manor.

Almost 50 people received their extra dose from the clinic with help from the local pharmacy.

“It’s a necessary thing. We need this to end and it’s a way to make people safer and healthier,” Kramer said.

Because the Pfizer vaccine booster is the only vaccine cleared by the FDA at this time, people at home who received the Moderna vaccine or Johnson and Johnson were unable to get the booster.

“I’m here to take care of people and part of taking care of people is doing as much as possible to protect them,” said nursing director Sean Schafer.

Schafer has looked after people like Delbert Blom, 95, who have been resident for six years. He was one of those who mobilized to do his part and receive his recall.

“I think it really helps. I think everyone should have a chance,” Blom said.

He hopes the pandemic subsides soon so he doesn’t have to worry about self-isolating or wearing a mask any longer.

“A bad disease. It’s definitely a bad disease,” Blom said.

With the onset of flu season, Reinbeck Pharmacy also administered flu shots at the clinic. Some people have received a vaccine in each arm because it is acceptable to get the flu shot with the COVID-19 booster.

Those eligible for the COVID-19 booster dose include people over 65, those living in long-term care facilities, and those aged 50 to 64 with underlying health conditions. Other eligible populations include people 18 to 49 with underlying health conditions and 18 to 64 who work or live in high-risk settings.


More and more healthcare workers face the vaccination mandate deadline


WATERTOWN, New York (WWNY) – More healthcare workers are required to receive at least one dose of the COVID vaccine by Thursday. This time, the focus is on people employed in places like adult care facilities and hospice care.

“When it all started in March 2020, the elderly and people with disabilities were the most vulnerable people to get sick and not do well with it, so we were at the center of it all,” said Jeffrey Jacomowitz, door -speaking, Carthage Center for Rehabilitation and Nursing.

The workers there are among the next group of healthcare workers who are mandated to get at least one COVID vaccine by Thursday.

Jacomowitz says the Carthage Center’s immunization status is 100%.

“We are very proud of our staff. I mean, it didn’t take a lot of effort like in other facilities, but they figured out what to do and they like working at the Carthage Center, so it turns out really good that way “, did he declare.

Other establishments are also seeing strong adoption of the vaccination mandate.

The Lewis County Health System operates a nursing home. Officials told 7 News that the vaccination rate is over 96% and that no service will need to be adapted.

Watertown Samaritan Medical Center also offers services at its Keep Nursing Home and Seniors Village. Officials say they don’t see any major issues as more than 98% of the system is eligible to operate right now.

In St. Lawrence County, United Helpers in Canton has a 96 percent vaccination rate.

As with all other vaccination mandates, workers who do not meet the deadline will no longer be employed by their establishment.

Copyright 2021 WWNY. All rights reserved.


SageWest Health Care Offers Monoclonal Antibody Treatment For COVID-19 Patients


Therapy decreases the severity of virus for outpatients

Fremont County, Wyo. (October 6, 2021) – SageWest Health Care has announced that it offers REGEN-COV (casirivimab and imdevimab), a monoclonal antibody therapy, for the treatment of outpatients with a mild to moderate case of COVID-19. Some patients may also be eligible for casirivimab and imdevimab after exposure to a COVID-19 patient depending on their risk profile. Developed by pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly / Regeneron Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the drug first received Emergency Use Authorization (EUA) from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA)

Monoclonal antibodies are proteins made in the lab that mimic the immune system’s ability to fight off harmful viruses. They are specially designed to help block the SARSCoV2 virus and prevent the virus from infecting healthy cells further. Administered intravenously, this innovative treatment is designed to help reduce the severity of COVID-19 in people who are COVID-19 positive and at risk of developing a severe form of the disease.

“SageWest Health Care is proud to offer this treatment locally to eligible patients, and our team has seen promising results in our first patients,” said Laurie Marcum, senior nurse at SageWest Health Care. “Providing this treatment locally is an important step forward in helping to prevent patients most at risk from being hospitalized due to COVID-19. “

Patients must meet specific clinical criteria, including having a laboratory-confirmed case of COVID-19 that is mild or moderate; having underlying health problems or> 65 years of age, and stable enough not to require hospitalization. This therapy requires an order from the patient’s provider.

To find a primary care provider, visit the Find a Doctor tab on SageWestHealthCare.com. For more information on monoclonal antibody therapy now available from SageWest Health Care, click here SageWest COVID-19.


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New law helps open specialized nursing facilities for hemophilia patients


Provisions in a new law that came into effect Oct. 1 will allow families affected by hemophilia and other bleeding disorders who are on Medicare to have better access to skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), National Hemophilia Foundation (NHF) announced.

This law, known as Hemophilia Access to the SNF Act, should rectify the challenges families faced in obtaining treatment, the NHF said in a Press release.

Getting this law passed was a top priority for the foundation throughout 2020, which saw the law as essential in helping to ease the financial burden of hemophilia and other inherited bleeding disorders on patients and their families.

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Prior to its approval as part of the 2021 federal finance bill, few SNFs were willing to admit patients with inherited bleeding disorders because Medicare reimbursement did not adequately cover the cost of factor therapies. coagulation that they needed.

Under this law, NFCs can separately bill for hemophilia and other inherited bleeding disorders treatments given to people covered by Medicare, allowing facilities to provide treatment themselves or to partner with them. a third, such as a specialty pharmacy.

Medicare will also be required to adequately reimburse facilities that treat patients with inherited bleeding disorders, allowing stays of up to 100 days (short stays) provided the patient meets certain criteria, including a hospital stay of at least three days or 72 hours. According to the NHF, this benefit is likely to be useful after surgery or a prolonged hospital stay.

The pooled payment that SNFs will receive from Medicare includes the costs associated with nursing care, therapy components, medications, necessary supplies, and any necessary equipment, in addition to room, board, and administration costs.

“With the passage of the law on access to the SNF for hemophilia, the SNF will be adequately reimbursed for expensive treatments needed by patients with bleeding disorders, thus removing a major barrier to care for the SNF. The NHF believes that this should be enough to allay the concerns that the SNSF has had in accepting beneficiaries with bleeding disorders, ”the foundation said on a report. fact sheet listing the provisions of the law.

In terms of treatment, the law covers a wide range of therapies used by people with inherited bleeding disorders, in addition to clotting factors.

Future approved treatments are expected to be added to covered therapies, the NHF noted. The secretary of the US Department of Health and Human Services has the authority to expand the list of treatments that can be billed separately, and the foundation is also working to recommend additional treatments.

As more information becomes available, the NHF intends to continually update its fact sheet.

People with questions or needing help getting someone into an SNF can write to Marla Feinstein at [email protected]


Nine deaths now associated with COVID outbreak in nursing homes – The Morgan Messenger

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by Kate Evans

The Stonerise Healthcare Berkeley Springs Center recorded a total of nine deaths associated with COVID-19 as of Friday, October 1, according to the COVID-19 dashboard from the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR).

Three deaths associated with COVID-19 were previously listed as of Monday, September 20 as a result of the epidemic. As of Friday, there were 18 actively positive residents and no actively positive staff members at the Berkeley Springs Stonerise facility, according to the DHHR website.

According to the Stonerise Healthcare website, the number of positive COVID-19 cases at their Berkeley Springs center on Monday, October 4 was one, with 78 negative or cured patients out of 79 total patients.

Some 27 residents and eight staff members had recovered from COVID-19 on Friday, according to the DHHR. A total of 45 residents and 13 staff were infected with the virus at the facility, and five of the staff were affected in a previous COVID outbreak that did not spread to residents. The DHHR COVID-19 dashboard is updated weekly on Friday morning for long-term care facilities.

A positive case now

“As of October 4, Stonerise Berkeley Springs had a patient in the center who tested positive for COVID-19. Forty-one patients have recovered from the virus, ”said Larry Pack, CEO of Stonerise Healthcare, in a press release from Kristin Anderson, chief marketing officer of Stonerise.

“As we have seen throughout the pandemic, when the COVID-19 virus is present in our communities, it can find its way into our centers. We are taking all necessary precautions to prevent further spread of the virus and are coordinating closely with state and local health officials, including the Morgan County Department of Health, ”Pack said.

Security measures

“We are supporting aggressive security measures to contain the spread of the virus, including restricting in-person visits, the use of personal protective equipment, the temporary suspension of patient gatherings, the performance of ongoing testing at the center-wide and maintaining all CDC infection control policies and guidelines, ”he added.

Pack noted that 96% of patients and 86% of staff at Stonerise Berkeley Springs received at least the first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.

“Our ultimate goal is the safety and health of our patients and employees, and we work diligently to continue to provide quality care while ensuring the safety of all. We are very proud of our team members who work as diligently as possible to provide a safe and loving environment for all patients, ”Pack said.

“We urge the local community to join us and our hospital partners in the fight against COVID-19 by embracing the vaccine, social distancing and wearing masks,” said previously Laura Barker, vice president of communications and strategic planning for Stonerise Healthcare.


Healthcare workers speak of moral distress during pandemic – The Hofstra Chronicle


During the presidential inauguration week symposia, a panel discussion was devoted to “An ethical approach to moral distress during COVID-19” on Thursday, September 30, at the Guthart Cultural Center theater.

Renee McLeod-Sordjan, Professor of Nursing and Chair of the Graduate Program in Nursing, Mary Lemp, Assistant Professor of Nursing and Walter L. Markowitz, Assistant Professor of Health Professions, hosted the event for the students and teachers.

At the start of the panel, speakers shared their personal experiences as they experienced the COVID-19 pandemic as healthcare workers.

“I was involved in an intensive care unit that was converted to a COVID unit,” said Dr. Jerome Weiner, intensive care physician and clinical assistant professor. “We had 20 patients and all of them were sedated, paralyzed and had no family by their side. It was really scary and hellish.

As healthcare workers look back on the pandemic, we shouldn’t forget the fear of scarce resources.

“When I reviewed for today, I realized I had nothing to write about because it was exactly the reality,” said nurse practitioner Elyse Isopo. “I could look at a patient and say he can’t get off the ventilator, but telling the patient he wouldn’t have a ventilator was a whole different experience.”

Not only did resources continue to dwindle, but it was also difficult to get help throughout the hospital.

“I spent a few nights covering up in the hospital,” Weiner said. “You could hear the loudspeaker ringing every 20 minutes to call for help, which had never happened in a facility before, as all the patients continued to deteriorate.”

Alec Sheridan, a first year physical education student, attended the panel and was touched by their experiences.

“The thought of making that decision about who would get life-saving care rather than another person must have had a huge mental impact on her,” Sheridan said.

Students found it helpful to hear the experiences of healthcare workers to better prepare for the future.

“I think it’s important to know how we have handled the pandemic as a whole, because there is a possibility that we will face it in the future,” said Shalin Madan, BS / MD freshman biology student. “If we look at these situations that occurred during the pandemic, we can learn how to better prepare for the future. “

Lemp spoke from an ethics committee perspective rather than a frontline perspective.

“[The pandemic] is something that I have learned a lot from personally. I have learned a lot about the resilience of our students, colleagues and patients and their families, ”she said. “With the support and collegiality, and knowing that you are valued, respected and loved, I think people can overcome just about anything. “

President Susan Poser asked the panel a question about how healthcare workers will practice general care once the COVID-19 pandemic is over.

“I think we’ve learned that humanity and resilience don’t live in the machines to keep humans alive, but in the people who help keep them here,” McLeod-Sordjan said. “I hope we’ve learned that people are more important than technology.”

Lemp also spoke about the positive results COVID-19 has brought to the healthcare community.

“I think one thing that has revolutionized us is the advent of telehealth,” she said. “They could come in from their home and be able to give good advice and that would really make a difference in the turn for this particular patient.”

The students were inspired by the ethics committee’s positive discussion of the pandemic, despite the challenges the world faced.

“They were able to find the silver lining in a stressful situation,” said Varun Sridhar, a freshman BS / MD biology student. “It showed me that there are different ways of looking positively at this crisis.”


Staffing, mandates are a problem for healthcare facilities


Data compiled by a lobby group for state nursing homes paints a grim picture where patients could be placed on waiting lists.

CARBONDALE, Pa .– The impact of the pandemic on nursing and personal care homes in Pennsylvania could be felt for years to come.

A lobby group representing dozens of nursing and personal care homes across the state says three-quarters of the facilities it represents have had to reduce the number of patients they can care for in the past six months.

It all has to do with a personnel crisis that began before the pandemic.

All of our lives have changed during the COVID-19 pandemic, but living in a retirement home or working for a retirement home has changed in a way that Noelle Kovaleski finds difficult to understand. She is the administrator of the Carbondale Nursing and Rehabilitation Center.

“It’s been life changing. The industry has changed dramatically over the past year. I can’t really say for the best. It’s been harder than in the past, it’s always been a tough industry, but it definitely has much bigger challenges over the past year, ”Kovaleski said.

As the spread of the COVID-19 virus slowed, another problem began to spread. Kovaleski says there has been a mass exodus of nurses leaving the long-term care industry, not only in Carbondale but in facilities across the state.

The Pennsylvania Healthcare Association, a lobby group for long-term care facilities, says three-quarters of all these facilities must turn away patients.

Most of this is in nursing homes where 85% of those surveyed said they had to limit admissions.

Kovaleski says she has had to limit admissions several times over the past six months at Carbondale Nursing and Rehab.

Finding a placement in a long-term care facility in Pennsylvania will likely be a long-term problem that will survive COVID-19.

“There will certainly be a problem of access to care because the staff crisis is not improving. It is continually getting worse, especially with the pending vaccine warrant. So, yeah, that’s gonna be a big deal. problem of access to care. There is already a problem of access to care, but it will get worse.

Kovaleski says that at the height of the pandemic, the federal government relaxed some restrictions on nursing homes to hire temporary nurses, and that has helped. She says the solution to this problem will require some government intervention, including more funding from Medicaid and Medicare. For now, nursing homes are doing their best to recruit more nurses.


Newsweek Recognizes Four Qualified Nursing Facilities On ‘Best Nursing Home’ List


Newsweek recognizes NYC Health + Hospitals post-acute care facilities as the best nursing homes in New York for 2022

NYC Health + Hospitals / Sea View is ranked 3rd in the state; NYC Health + Hospitals / Carter is ranked 4th

Rankings are designed to help patients and their families make informed decisions about where to receive their long-term and post-acute care

New York, New York State

NYC Health + Hospitals announced today that Newsweek has recognized four of the healthcare system’s qualified nursing facilities in its third annual edition “Best retirement homes 2022” rankings. The rankings were assessed against a number of metrics, including key performance data, reputation surveys, and the response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Rankings are designed to help patients and their families make informed decisions about where to receive their long-term and post-acute care. For the ranking, Newsweek identified 450 leading facilities in 25 states, recognizing 55 post-acute care facilities in New York State.

Facilities recognized as the best nursing homes in New York State include:

“Newsweek’s recognition of our skilled nursing facilities is a testament to the high quality care we provide to each of our patients and residents,” said Senior Vice President of Post Acute Care at NYC Health + Hospitals Maureen E. McClusky, FACHE, LNHA. “Making the decision to transfer someone to a skilled nursing facility can be a difficult and intimidating choice to make, but our passionate and expert teams have created healthy communities in each of our facilities that make that decision a little easier. for families and loved ones. . We thank the passionate and skilled staff at our nursing facility who make this all a reality. “

“This recognition is not accomplished by the hard work of one person, but rather by the support of an interdisciplinary team including nurses, doctors, social workers, dieticians, physiotherapists and support staff,” said NYC Health + Hospitals / Governor CEO Susan A. Sales, FACHE.

“It is truly an honor to be recognized again by Newsweek as one of the best nursing homes in New York State,” said NYC Health + Hospitals / Coler CEO Robert K. Hughes. “I am extremely proud of our record of sustained excellence in the quality of care and quality of life provided to those we serve. This recognition reflects the unwavering commitment and sincere compassion shown by our staff every day.

“To be recognized again as one of Newsweek’s top nursing homes is a real honor,” said NYC Health + Hospitals / Sea View CEO Matthew D. Levy. “The staff at Sea View have once again proven that even in the most difficult times, they are up to the needs of our residents. It is this dedication that makes me so proud of each of our staff. Without this commitment, we would not have been able to obtain this honor ”.

“We are thrilled to be named to Newsweek’s ‘Best Nursing Homes’ list,” said Floyd R. Long, CEO of NYC Health + Hospitals / Carter. “Achieving this notable ranking for several consecutive years validates our statements to the public that Carter provides optimal qualified care with the highest quality outcomes and excellent patient / family experiences. We are proud of our accomplishments and look forward to expanding our services to remain a leading nursing home for years to come. “

NYC Health + Hospitals currently has 1,666 patients in its post-acute long-term care facilities. Patients in this group come from all over New York City and range from 18 to over 100 years old.

“As the population ages, it is critically important that all New Yorkers have access to long-term care services. Thanks to NYC Health + Hospitals, people can get affordable, high-quality care, ”said Chairman of the Assembly Health Committee, Richard Gottfried. “I congratulate NYC Health + Hospitals, especially the direct care workers serving patients across the city at this extremely difficult time, for this important recognition.”

“Our retirement homes are crucial to the health and well-being of our seniors. Our nursing homes and the quality of care they provide has been even more critical than ever during the pandemic, ”said Assembly Member Michael J. Cusick. “I am delighted that NYC Health + Hospitals / Sea View is ranked third among the best nursing homes in the state. The excellent work the staff and administration do for their residents has been recognized and I am proud to have such a great facility here in my district.

“I congratulate Dr Mitchell Katz and Coler of NYC Health + Hospitals for their ranking in Newsweek for ‘best care homes‘,” said Assembly Member Rebecca Seawright. “At the height of the COVID-19 crisis, we appreciate the commitment of residents and administration in the creation of a Coler task force.”

NYC Health + Hospitals / Carter, Coler, Gouverneur and Seaview have achieved a five-star CMS rating, which ranks them among the top 10% of qualified nursing facilities nationwide. In addition, NYC Health + Hospitals / Carter, Coler and Seaview are ranked in the top 1st quintile in the New York State Department of Health (NYS DOH) Nursing Home Quality Pool. NYS DOH results are based on measures of quality, compliance, and potentially avoidable hospitalizations in the long-term care population.

New York State has more than 600 retirement homes.

To learn more about Newsweek’s “Best Nursing Homes 2022” ranking, visit ranking site.

To take virtual tours of each of NYC Health + Hospitals’ qualified nursing facilities, visit https://www.nychealthandhospitals.org/virtual-tours-for-post-acute-facilities/.




Retirement home: the vaccines worked

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Posted: 10/05/2021 14:57:49 PM

NEWPORT – The Woodlawn Care Center ended its latest COVID-19 outbreak last week without any deaths, according to the facility administrator.

That’s four fewer deaths than the Newport Nursing Home has had during its epidemic last fall. Facility administrator Chris Martin attributes this to vaccinations.

“We’ve had groundbreaking cases – 11 out of 12 cases among staff and residents were fully vaccinated – but deaths and hospitalizations (were) down significantly,” Martin said.

The 53-bed nursing home on Pine Street in Newport also had six hospitalizations during last year’s outbreak, which included a total of 57 people; 33 residents and 24 employees. This outbreak lasted 46 days and ended in mid-December.

The recent outbreak, which lasted 30 days and ended last Thursday, included a total of 12 cases, including seven residents and five employees. Only one resident had to be hospitalized during the outbreak.

Last year vaccinations were not yet available, but this year around 80% of workers and 100% of residents were vaccinated. Vaccines are not yet mandatory for nursing home workers, but federal officials said a requirement arrives.

Additionally, the vaccination helped some residents avoid quarantine during the recent outbreak. In last year’s outbreak, the facility only had 17 visits, but this year there were 220. The 44 residents exempted from quarantine this year were also able to meet in small groups while throughout the recent outbreak.

Elsewhere in Newport, Summercrest Senior Living on Summer Street was on the New Hampshire Department of Health and Human Services list of long-term care facilities with active outbreaks last week. There have been nine cases, including five residents and four employees. No deaths have been reported.


New Offer for Qualified Nursing Facilities and Seniors’ Homes Streamlines Information Flow to Residents, Caregivers and Families | Business


MISSISSAUGA, Ontario – (BUSINESS WIRE) – October 5, 2021–

PointClickCare, the leader in cloud-based healthcare software for the long-term and post-acute care market, today announced its Connected care center offer. The online solution allows residents, families and caregivers to play a more active role in their care journey. The new offering provides access to real-time information on resident well-being, enabling family and caregivers to make informed decisions about care anytime and anywhere.

As demand for access to health information continues to grow, Connected Care Center enables Qualified Nursing Facilities (SNFs) and Senior Living Communities (SLs) to save hours spent on research and transmission information, allowing them to spend more time doing what they do best – providing quality care. Residents can also view their health information in real time, giving them the ability to have an impact on the outcome of their care. The Connected Care Center requires minimal staff involvement and is integrated directly into PointClickCare’s EHR, making it quick and easy to activate. The offering can also give third-party healthcare providers, such as physicians, secure access to a patient’s most recent health information, ensuring continuity of care.

With the recent implementation of the Cures Act, health care providers, including NFCs, are required by law to provide access to health information. The Connected Care Center provides an easy-to-implement solution that ensures Cures compliance while reducing the time spent handling high volumes of information requests.

“Access to health data is crucial to making the best and most informed decisions about patient care,” said Angelo Papatheodorou, Venture board member and operating partner at PointClickCare. “This offering puts a unified source of patient data at the fingertips of families, NFCs and other healthcare providers, eliminating information gaps that can so often interfere with quality of care. Enabling a more holistic view of patient care is at the heart of what we do, and we continue to push the boundaries of interoperability to ensure the best health outcomes for patients. “

As part of a PointClickCare subscription, US-based SNFs and SLs can provide access to the Scalable Offer at all locations at no additional cost.

To learn more about how the PointClickCare Connected Care Center can ease the administrative burden for SNF and SL facilities, visit here. For residents, families and caregivers who connect to the Connected Care Center, please click here.

About PointClickCare

With a fully integrated suite of applications powered by cloud-based healthcare software, PointClickCare is leading the way in helping healthcare providers connect, collaborate and share data across their network. PointClickCare provides a variety of care teams across the continuum of care with real-time patient information at any point in a patient’s care journey, enabling better decision making and better clinical outcomes for less cost. Over 21,000 long-term and acute / post-acute care providers and over 1,300 hospitals use PointClickCare today. For more information on PointClickCare software solutions, visit pointclickcare.com.

View source version on businesswire.com:https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20211005005040/en/

CONTACT: Media contact:

Tarrah ledoux

tarrah.ledoux@pointclickcare.com

603 759 1035

Analyst contact:

Alison minaglia

Alison.Minaglia@pointclickcare.com

917-9023404

KEYWORD: UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA CANADA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: HEALTH TECHNOLOGY MANAGED NURSING SOFTWARE

SOURCE: PointClickCare

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

PUB: 05/10/2021 09:00 / DISC: 05/10/2021 09:03

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Copyright Business Wire 2021.


Strengthening Nursing and Midwifery to Improve Health Services in India


The density of health workers, in terms of the number of doctors, nurses and midwives per 10,000 population, has always told us that India has far fewer nurses and midwives than needed. The absolute numbers have increased over the years, however, the ratio has remained low as population growth continues to outpace that growth. Measures such as integrating ASHAs into healthcare workers and families providing bedside nursing in hospitals hide some of this acute shortage in the public health system.

The Covid pandemic has shown us that more inpatient services are needed at the primary and secondary level of care and that ad hoc arrangements made through the contractual hiring of nurses and ANMs to fill this gap lead to violations and exploitation of labor law. Some states have witnessed strikes and walkouts as harassed nurses refuse to work low wages or long hours. At the other end of the career path, creating and filling senior nursing positions (there are no positions specifically for midwives) has been a futile process, fraught with procedural muddles. senior nurses are in the salary bracket to qualify and those who have a university education and are unwilling to relocate. The absence of nurses in the decision-making bodies of health systems and the lack of long-term planning for nursing and midwifery have led to this capacity gap. For example, although midwives are included in nursing training, staff nurses can be placed in any department of the hospital. This gives flexibility to hospital administrators for the placement of nurses in various departments, but leads to a decline in the skills of midwives to such an extent that it is now difficult to find nurses who wish to specialize in a field. area of ​​practice, as promotions and salaries do not take such specialized practice into account. For hospitals, the government still uses the Personnel Inspection Unit (SI Unit) figures for nurses despite the High Powerd Committee on Nursing suggesting changes. Nursing superintendents at most hospitals admit they are chronically understaffed. As of 2021, there is no comprehensive data on nursing or midwifery staff in state hospitals, and public and private hospitals are not required to provide their nurse: patient ratio data on an annual basis.

A comprehensive analysis of the nursing workforce is needed to recommend improvements and prevent the brain drain of this profession to foreign countries where scholarships and midwives are attractive professions within their healthcare system. Recommendations should start at the highest level within the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, DGHS and most of the Health and Family Welfare Directorates and Medical Directorates, starting with the inclusion of a greater number of nurses or midwives in decision-making and the filling of all nursing and midwifery positions with nurses and not kept on an ad hoc basis or officiating by doctors.

This document looks briefly at the global workforce plans developed by WHO and the barriers to achieving the goals of the RHS Vision2030 numbers in our mixed health system.

Preparations to improve nursing and midwifery services to meet national commitments set for the achievement of universal health coverage (UHC), achievement of health and wellness goals, and development of the Global Health Workforce Strategy. health 2030 started early in India. Members of the High Level Panel of Experts on Universal Health Coverage (HLEG 2010) who reported to the Chairman of the Planning Commission, reviewed the numbers and submitted a 15-year timeline. Almost 10 years later, I am now taking this opportunity to re-evaluate the progress of HRH in nursing and midwifery and to see what processes are in place and explain why progress has been delayed despite recommendations made for better progress in nursing and midwifery. career, monetary rewards and suggested additional training and responsibility for these essential professionals within our mixed health system (public and private).

An assessment of gender and its implications for UHC is essential. One of the simplistic actions would be to increase the number of nurses and midwives and achieve gender equality in our formal workforce to meet India’s SDG-5 goals. Nursing and midwifery can be attractive careers for young women if gender barriers are lifted. Today, nurses and midwives struggle to balance a full-time career while maintaining culturally prescribed and socially acceptable gender roles. An adequate nursing workforce means that each nurse covers more patient care than expected and work schedules are less flexible. For example, when there is a shortage of nurses, shift work becomes more rigid and the lack of predictability and long working hours lead to burnout. Over time, although working conditions have improved, the overall participation of women in the workforce is declining and there is evidence that higher management positions, union leaders and greater capacity to operate. action by nurses to claim their rights suggests that much remains to be done.

Gender issues must be taken into account if we are to strengthen nursing and midwifery and increase its number and the quality of work, given that over 85% of nurses and 100% of nursing assistants are women. Of the HLEG’s top three gender recommendations for UHC, the second is the recommendation on recognizing the role gender plays in the life of a health care provider.

“Recommendation 2: Recognize and strengthen the central role of women in the delivery of health care both in the formal health system and in the home. Address the concerns of women workers regarding safety, transport, housing, hygiene and sanitation; as well as maternity benefits, their need to meet within the district and end sexual harassment; Increase the number of professional women in higher management positions through better career paths. Ensure the representation of women in all health management structures, including nurses; Offer more community care programs. Day care centers, palliative care, home care and ambulatory care services that can support the delivery of home health care ”.

To understand the progress made in popularizing access to nursing and midwifery, in the area of ​​incentives to enter the labor market, a framework is provided in the “Global Strategy on Human Resources for Health: Workforce”. work 2030 ”from the WHO. The challenge India faces in meeting the nursing workforce goals can be interpreted using this diagram to address policy levers on the demand and supply side for production and supply. increased use of HRH.

This framework helps us understand the policy levers that shape labor markets in HRH. I would like to use this document to expand on what I see as the issues related to expanding nursing and midwifery. Starting from the value placed on education, we question the viability of education loans as a means of providing HRH, especially for nursing care. It should be noted that the cost of graduate nursing training in the private sector does not allow the repayment of the student loan even in 15 years, if he is employed as a nurse in a small private hospital given the current cost of living. Taking the case of female employees, especially nurses and midwives, I would like to further explore some of the incentives and disincentives to employment in the public and private sectors and suggest why emigration is becoming such an attractive option.

A review of the past 10 years of annual rural health statistics which provide figures on HRH employment in primary health care. It is observed that the posts of obstetricians, and other medical specialists at the level of CHCs and rural hospitals have remained vacant, while the posts of nurses and ANM are generally filled, some states even suffer from a shortage of doctors. . The reasons for these two different employment tragedies between allopathic doctors versus nurses and midwives are due to differences in the pay structure between the public and private sectors. In terms of income, the incentives are such that doctors can earn more in the private sector while nurses earn more in public sector health facilities. Although public sector physicians in many states may practice or receive an additional non-practice allowance (meaning that additional income from practicing outside of their role in the public health care system is considered), many still chose to work in the private sector where they have more control over their income thanks to a complex incentive system in the healthcare industry that highlights the physician as the leader of the healthcare team. health and income generator. Nurses, on the other hand, are likely to be paid better in the public sector than in the private sector. These are also the same reasons why the private sector in India is experiencing high turnover of nurses and the cycle continues with low investment in nursing within the private sector since the industrial model does not see a high return on investment. . The shocking report that most private sector hospital chains are against paying for nursing at least ??20,000 per month is eloquent proof of upholding quality nursing care as a value proposition. We must do better to plan for the future.

(The article was written by Leila Varkey Sc.D, Center for Catalyzing Change and Associate Commissioner of the Lancet Commission on Reimagining India’s Health Care System.)


Start of admission to the nursing counseling course


  • Document verification and counseling takes place for the first time outside of Bengaluru
  • Hundreds of candidates from 4 districts expected for four-day trip to Mysuru

Mysore / Mysore: Document verification and counseling for eligible students seeking admission to the 3-year GNM course (Nursing and Midwifery Diploma Course) under government quotas, began to Mysore Medical College and Research Institute (MMC & RI) here this morning.

Students from Mysuru, Mandya, Chamarajanagar and Kodagu districts are participating in this verification campaign, which is taking place in 12 locations across the state, including Mysuru, for the first time outside of Bengaluru, due to the crisis in COVID.

The Karnataka State Diploma in Nursing Examination Board in Bengaluru is the student selection authority for the course. In Mysuru, the course is offered at the Government College of Nursing on the premises of MMC & RI.

Today, the selection process for the GNM course began with document verification and counseling for the first round of selection of applicants who had applied online to apply for admission under government quotas.

More than 200 students from four districts attended counseling today. The ride will continue until October 9 every day except tomorrow (October 6), which is a government holiday because of Mahalaya Amavasya.

Today, day one, students who placed 1 to 2,500 on the eligibility test were asked to come in for document verification. On October 7, document verification and counseling will take place for students ranked 2,501 to 5,000; October 8 for students ranked 5,001 to 7,500 and October 9 for students ranked 7,501 and above.

Students wishing to be admitted must bring their original SSLC and PUC cards, a study certificate for having studied in Karnataka for at least 7 years, a caste certificate, an application fee payment challan, etc.

Besides Bengaluru and Mysuru, counseling takes place in Shivamogga, Ballari, Belagavi, Kalaburagi, Hassan, Mangaluru, Hubballi, Koppal, Chitradurga and Bagalkot. Students can call the Ph: 080-26700074 or 26700075 for any clarification or log on to the site: www.ksdneb.org.


New offering for skilled nursing facilities and senior living communities streamlines information flow to residents, caregivers and families


MISSISSAUGA, Ontario – (COMMERCIAL THREAD) –PointClickCare, the leader in cloud-based healthcare software for the long-term and post-acute care market, today announced its Connected care center offer. The online solution allows residents, families and caregivers to play a more active role in their care journey. The new offering provides access to real-time information on resident well-being, enabling family and caregivers to make informed decisions about care anytime and anywhere.

As demand for access to health information continues to grow, Connected Care Center enables Qualified Nursing Facilities (SNFs) and Senior Living Communities (SLs) to save hours spent on research and transmission information, allowing them to spend more time doing what they do best – providing quality care. Residents can also view their health information in real time, allowing them to have an impact on the outcome of their care. The Connected Care Center requires minimal staff involvement and is integrated directly into PointClickCare’s EHR, making it quick and easy to activate. The offering can also give third-party healthcare providers, such as physicians, secure access to a patient’s most recent health information, ensuring continuity of care.

With the recent implementation of the Cures Act, health care providers, including NFCs, are required by law to provide access to health information. The Connected Care Center provides an easy-to-implement solution that ensures Cures compliance while reducing the time spent handling high volumes of information requests.

“Access to health data is crucial to making the best and most informed decisions about patient care,” said Angelo Papatheodorou, Venture board member and operating partner at PointClickCare. “This offering puts a unified source of patient data at the fingertips of families, NFCs and other healthcare providers, eliminating information gaps that can so often interfere with quality of care. Enabling a more holistic view of patient care is at the heart of what we do, and we continue to push the boundaries of interoperability to ensure the best health outcomes for patients. ”

As part of a PointClickCare subscription, US-based SNFs and SLs can provide access to the Scalable Offer at all locations at no additional cost.

To learn more about how the PointClickCare Connected Care Center can ease the administrative burden for SNF and SL facilities, visit here. For residents, families and caregivers who log into the Connected Care Center, please click here.

About PointClickCare

With a fully integrated suite of applications powered by cloud-based healthcare software, PointClickCare is leading the way in helping healthcare providers connect, collaborate and share data across their network. PointClickCare provides a variety of care teams across the continuum of care with real-time patient information at any point in a patient’s care journey, enabling better decision making and better clinical outcomes for less cost. Over 21,000 long-term and acute / post-acute care providers and over 1,300 hospitals use PointClickCare today. For more information on PointClickCare software solutions, visit pointclickcare.com.


Parkinson’s: ‘Stupidity’, no private equity, blocks some retirement home purchases – News

0


Poor business decisions, not the source of investment, have been the biggest problem behind some recent nursing home purchases, according to the president and CEO of the nation’s largest nursing home association.

Critics have targeted nursing homes with an increasing drumbeat that began during the spring congressional hearings and continued through a summer of discontent. Much of that was mis-targeted, said Mark Parkinson, senior executive of the American Health Care Association / National Center for Assisted Living.

“We have no concerns about the legislation regarding the disclosure of the owner of buildings,” Parkinson said. McKnight Long Term Care News Friday. “The issue of private equity is more complicated because it doesn’t matter whether the money comes from a bank, a REIT or private equity. If you pay too much for an installation, you will have a hard time managing it.

He called it “puzzled that some people have focused on private equity” when the “real” problem is “bad business decisions”.

Mark Parkinson, President and CEO, AHCA / NCAL

“They’ve paid too much for nursing homes and then they’re either stuck with leases or bank payments or private equity payments that make it difficult to provide care. It is difficult to regulate against stupidity. It is difficult to regulate against people paying too much for an asset.

Previous studies have indicated that living in a for-profit nursing home increases the risk of infection or death from COVID-19, while another has linked PE ownership to an increase of around 10% the likelihood of death in the short term, even outside of the pandemic. It also raised questions about staff reductions and increased turnover.

But only about 10% of nursing homes in the United States are privately owned, so the focus on this is “probably misguided,” Parkinson explained.

“If your mortgage payment is too high for a bank, your lease payment too high for a REIT, if the returns you have to give PE are so high that you cannot afford to have adequate staff, it is is a real problem. But there’s nothing inherent in private equity that creates this. The excess leverage is the problem.

He said the biggest question about some investors paying extremely high prices is “what do they see that others don’t see?” Only time will tell whether the most recent high priced trades will succeed or not. “

A recently announced purchase of a ticket involved Diversicare gets picked up for more than three times its recent stock price by a private acquisition group. The pending sale has raised concerns about the operations of more than 60 qualified nursing facilities which are largely immune from public scrutiny. The belief is that as pandemic conditions continue to financially threaten more facilities, more M&A activity will intensify.

Parkinson added, however, that overall, the average price per bed has “fallen quite significantly over the past few years. There are a few outliers that are notable, but the average price has come down, possibly due to the pandemic. “


Jefferson shooting is latest example of workplace violence in healthcare


A murder at Jefferson University Hospital on Monday morning was a devastating reminder that for many healthcare professionals, workplace violence is too often a part of their lives.

“It is a tragedy that violence has taken place in the workplace as we fight to keep it safe,” said Chris Woods, president of the National Union of Hospital and Health Care Employees, Local 1199c.

The shooter and the victim were both Jefferson staff and longtime union members, he said.

Health care providers are among those most likely to be victims of workplace violence, according to data collected by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration. From 2002 to 2013, OSHA reported that workplace violence requiring the injured person to take time off to recover was four times more likely in health care settings than the average for other private industries.

READ MORE: Nursing assistant killed by colleague at Jefferson University Hospital, and two Philadelphia police officers shot dead

“A hospital is supposed to be a safe place,” said Maureen May, a nurse at Temple University Hospital and president of the Pennsylvania Association of Staff Nurses and Allied Professionals. “Measures are in place to address them, but these measures are simply not sufficient at this stage. “

But, as in Jefferson’s case on Monday where a certified nursing assistant is accused of shooting a coworker in the hospital, only 3% of injuries to healthcare workers in the workplace are the result of violence between coworkers, a OSHA reported.

“It’s certainly a new level of concern for many of us, knowing that someone can come in with a weapon like this, or multiple weapons, and can do it to one of our own employees.” said Shae Spicer, a nurse from Jefferson. .

OSHA found that violence against workers by patients was much more common. These account for 80% of all cases and are considered common in some hospitals. A 2017 survey found that 88% of staff at Level 1 trauma centers had experienced or witnessed workplace violence within a six-month period. A 2019 article on Jefferson’s own website noted that 60% of workplace assaults occur in healthcare facilities, although those staff represent only 13% of the nation’s workforce.

At Temple, May said, staff know a colleague has been involved in a physical altercation when they hear a “Code Gray” being announced.

“There are times when we hear it four, five or six times a day,” she said.

Among the most high-profile incidents of violence against healthcare workers in the region, a patient killed a social worker and injured a psychiatrist at Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital in Delaware County in 2014. The psychiatrist had a gun and retaliated, injuring the patient.

In 2017, a nurse at Lehigh Valley Hospital-Muhlenberg required surgery after being stabbed in the neck by a man the nurse treated earlier in the month.

READ MORE: Nursing assistant shot dead by Jefferson Hospital colleague was father of three

Jefferson’s security measures include metal detectors in the emergency department, security turnstiles in all of its main buildings that require visitors to check in, and its own armed police force formed about six years ago.

“There are so many incidents involving firearms happening in the world today; Jefferson vice president of public safety Joseph Byham said in this 2019 post, “we knew we had to be able to react quickly if something went wrong.”

The hospital also gives some staff members Bluetooth-equipped badges which, when pressed, send a signal to security and the nurse in charge of the unit to alert security personnel that a member of the staff need help. Jefferson did not say whether this system was used during the shooting.

The causes of violence can include psychiatric disorders, people under the influence of drugs and alcohol, or strong emotions that can overwhelm people in intensive care units. Families facing bad news about a loved one can go wild, experts said. Emergency, geriatric and behavioral health departments were particularly at risk, OSHA reported.

Kendra Barkasi, president of Nurses and Techs United at Eagleville Hospital in Montgomery County, which cares for psychiatric patients and drug addicts, said last year that a patient hit her in the face with a container used to hold needles.

“The rest of the night she threatened to hurt me,” she said.

She has also been the victim of vulgarity and threats of rape from patients, she said.

Reports of such encounters probably do not represent the full extent of the problem, experts said. Incidents that do not result in injury often go unrecorded, the American Academy of Emergency Medicine Resident and Student Association (AAEM / RSA) reported last year. Hospitals or healthcare providers that do not have clear policies for reporting workplace violence can give workers the impression that there is no point in documenting a violent encounter.

Hospitals are generally loath to install metal detectors at entrances other than the emergency department, said Lauris Freidenfelds, former director of security at Rush University Medical Center in Chicago, who now heads care safety consulting projects. Health Care for Telgian, Inc ..

“Leaders have always meant that healthcare should always be an open and inviting atmosphere,” he said.

But metal detectors would only stop a fraction of workplace violence in healthcare facilities, AAEM / RSA reported, because most assaults do not involve the use of a gun.

The COVID-19 pandemic, which sends waves of patients to overwhelmed hospitals that can only allow limited visits from family members, has only increased tension in many facilities.

“It’s been a very difficult year, 18 months, for healthcare,” said Spicer. “It certainly didn’t make it any easier. “

Editor Erin McCarthy contributed to this article.


The Power of Nursing Course: An Innovative Online Synchronous Experience


This article was originally published here

J Nurses Educ. Oct 2021; 60 (10): 594-597. doi: 10.3928 / 01484834-20210730-02. Online publication October 1, 2021.

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: An educational and clinical nursing program lacks the emotional experiences essential to fostering a deeper connection to the art of nursing. The Power of Nursing (PON) course has been identified as meeting this need. With the pandemic disruption of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19), professors had the opportunity to adapt this Discovery Model course within the limits of technology.

METHOD: With the required modifications, the PON was offered as the first online synchronous course using the Zoom platform in its entirety.

RESULTS: Participants described feelings of connection, an awareness of their personal strengths as a healthcare provider, and a sense of security and comfort within the virtual platform. Comparison of in-person and virtual surveys after the course showed that PON learning experiences can transcend both platforms.

CONCLUSION: Currently, with COVID-19 and the need for such transformational experiences, students have confirmed that PON can be offered virtually, eliciting the same positive responses to experiential exercises while filling a gap in nursing programs. [J Nurs Educ. 2021;60(10):594-597.].

PMID: 34605681 | DOI: 10.3928 / 01484834-20210730-02


Ensign Group Adds Two Qualified Nursing Facilities to


SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, Calif., October 04, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The Ensign Group, Inc. (Nasdaq: ENSG), the parent company of the Ensign â„¢ group of companies, which invests in and provides skilled nursing and nursing services. life, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology and other health and rehabilitation services, today announced the acquisition of the operations of the following qualified nursing facilities in Texas and Idaho:

  • River Pointe de Trinity Health and Rehabilitation Center, a 98-bed skilled nursing facility located in Trinity, Texas;
  • Park Village Health and rehabilitation, a 150-bed specialty nursing facility located in De Soto, Texas; and
  • Skyline Transitional Care Center, an 80-bed skilled nursing facility located in Boise, Idaho.

The acquisitions came into effect on October 1, 2021 and will be subject to a long-term triple net lease.

“These opportunistic acquisitions further strengthen our growing presence in Texas and Idaho,” said Barry Port, CEO of Ensign. “These acquisitions fit very well into our existing operations from a cultural and geographic perspective,” he added.

Kevin Niccum, President of Keystone Care LLC, the Texas-based subsidiary of Ensign, added, “We are delighted to be working with the wonderful caregivers at each of these facilities to improve the quality of care provided to every resident and to his family. “

“We couldn’t be happier to add the Skyline Transitional Care Center, which has a large number of caregivers who genuinely care about the residents and the families they serve,” said Stephen Farnsworth, president of Idaho-Nevada Market. ‘Ensign.

The acquisition brings Ensign’s growing portfolio to 245 healthcare facilities, 22 of which also include senior living facilities, in thirteen states. Ensign owns 95 real estate assets. Mr Port reiterated that Ensign is actively seeking opportunities to acquire real estate and lease both skilled, high performing and distressed nursing, senior citizen residences and other healthcare related businesses in across the United States.

About Ensign â„¢

The independent operating subsidiaries of Ensign Group, Inc. provide a wide range of nursing and residential care services for the elderly, physical, occupational and speech therapy, and other rehabilitation and health care services in 245 healthcare facilities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa. , Kansas, Nebraska, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin. More information about Ensign is available at http://www.ensigngroup.net.

Contact details

The Ensign Group, Inc., (949) 487-9500, ir@ensigngroup.net

SOURCE: The Ensign Group, Inc.


Ensign Group Adds Two Qualified Nursing Facilities in Texas; A skilled nursing facility in Idaho


SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, Calif., October 04, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – The Ensign Group, Inc. (Nasdaq: ENSG), the parent company of the Ensign â„¢ group of companies, which invests in and provides skilled nursing and nursing services. life, physiotherapy, occupational therapy and speech-language pathology and other health and rehabilitation services, today announced the acquisition of the operations of the following qualified nursing facilities in Texas and Idaho:

  • River Pointe de Trinity Health and Rehabilitation Center, a 98-bed skilled nursing facility located in Trinity, Texas;

  • Park Village Health and rehabilitation, a 150-bed specialty nursing facility located in De Soto, Texas; and

  • Skyline Transitional Care Center, an 80-bed skilled nursing facility located in Boise, Idaho.

The acquisitions came into effect on October 1, 2021 and will be subject to a long-term triple net lease.

“These opportunistic acquisitions further strengthen our growing presence in Texas and Idaho,” said Barry Port, CEO of Ensign. “These acquisitions fit very well into our existing operations from a cultural and geographic perspective,” he added.

Kevin Niccum, President of Keystone Care LLC, the Texas-based subsidiary of Ensign, added, “We are delighted to be working with the wonderful caregivers at each of these facilities to improve the quality of care provided to every resident and to his family. “

“We couldn’t be happier to add the Skyline Transitional Care Center, which has a large number of caregivers who genuinely care about the residents and the families they serve,” said Stephen Farnsworth, president of Idaho-Nevada Market. ‘Ensign.

The acquisition brings Ensign’s growing portfolio to 245 healthcare facilities, 22 of which also include senior living facilities, in thirteen states. Ensign owns 95 real estate assets. Mr Port reaffirmed that Ensign is actively seeking opportunities to acquire real estate and lease both skilled, high performing and distressed nursing, senior citizen residences and other healthcare related businesses in across the United States.

About Ensign â„¢

The independent operating subsidiaries of Ensign Group, Inc. provide a wide range of nursing and residential care services for the elderly, physical, occupational and speech therapy, and other rehabilitation and health care services in 245 healthcare facilities in Arizona, California, Colorado, Idaho, Iowa. , Kansas, Nebraska, Nevada, South Carolina, Texas, Utah, Washington and Wisconsin. More information on Ensign is available at http://www.ensigngroup.net.

Contact details

The Ensign Group, Inc., (949) 487-9500, ir@ensigngroup.net

SOURCE: The Ensign Group, Inc.


Jim Wood presided over information hearing on “California qualified nursing facilities” on Tuesday – Redheaded Blackbelt


Here is a press release from Assembly Member Jim Wood:

Assembly Member Jim Wood to chair information hearing of Assembly Health Committee Tuesday October 5 at 1:30 p.m., on licensing of qualified nursing facilities, inspections and quality of care. Various stakeholders and representatives of the Department of Public Health will appear before the committee. An agenda and background documents are being prepared and will be available on October 1. Check out this link https://ahea.assembly.ca.gov/content/informationaloversight-hearings for availability.

WHO:

California Assembly Health Committee

WHEN:

Tuesday, October 5, 2021, 1:30 p.m.

OR:

State Capitol, Sacramento, California

Courtroom 4202

DIRECT:

The hearing will be available to stream live on https://www.assembly.ca.gov/todaysevents, on the day of the event. You can also consult the audience, once archived, here: https://www.assembly.ca.gov/media-archive.

COVID PROTOCOLS:

The Capitol will be open to participation in this audience. The public is strongly encouraged to participate through the web portal. Any member of the public attending a hearing on Capitol Hill must wear a mask at all times while in the building. We encourage the public to monitor the committee’s website for updates and backgrounders that will be posted prior to the hearing.

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‘The trajectory looks good,’ says nation’s top nursing home leader of COVID recovery – News

0


Although they are not as optimistic as at the start of the year, the conditions for the census of establishments are encouraging, said the head of the largest association of nursing homes in the country.

The next three months, however, will be critical in determining the fate of the nation’s more than 15,000 skilled nursing facilities, said Mark Parkinson, president and CEO of the American Health Care Association.

“We were making very good steady progress towards census recovery until the delta variant hit and since then we have taken a break from recovery. We haven’t had a retreat, and I think that’s encouraging, ”said Parkinson McKnight Long Term Care News Friday.

“If we had had another 3% or 4% drop with delta, we would be in much worse shape than we are now,” he added. “We have plateaued at about 72% nationwide, and now we need to start rebuilding.”

In February, Parkinson said establishments needed to earn about 1% of the monthly census over the next year or else it would be “a real problem.” In January and February, nursing homes regained 0.8% to 1% in census per month.

“We were on the right track towards financial stability by the end of 2021,” he recalled on Friday. “Then the delta hit. We went from 67.5% to 72.5%. We still have 7% to go. We’ve been on hiatus for six weeks. The good news is we haven’t backed down, thank goodness.

Every Thursday, updated census figures are provided by the National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Last week, a 0.2% upside boost was seen after two weeks of a 0.1% decline.

“If we can get back to where we were before delta, we could end the year in the 75% range. The area wouldn’t be fully restored, but we would be at the point where we could see the light at the end of the tunnel, ”Parkinson said.

“Then the hope would be that we would continue to recover at this rate, so by mid-2022 we would be back to pre-pandemic levels. It really is the best case scenario at this point. It’s not great, but we can survive this.

A continuous pause or retraction would mean “real problems,” he said.

He said COVID-19 infections must continue to decline in the general population so that hospitals can perform more elective procedures, which would lead to admissions to more skilled nursing facilities and better income stream.

“We need life to get back to normal. I think it’s likely, Parkinson said measuredly. “It would be ridiculous to be sure because this virus has proven to be unpredictable. But the trajectory looks good. I really feel like almost every week there is some good news.

The second need is for staffing conditions to improve, Parkinson said. Just as census levels hit historic lows during the pandemic, the industry is now struggling to find workers – more than ever. Many facilities have recently been unable to accept new residents due to historically low staff levels, Parkinson said, and some have announced closures.

“Continued support” must come from state and federal agencies, he added. It could help create competitive salaries and build career paths. “If we don’t get that help, we just can’t be competitive,” he explained.

One silver lining, he recalled, is that the demographics have not changed.

“As gloomy as it has sometimes appeared during COVID, the silver lining is that there are a lot of people who will be turning 80 who will need our services,” Parkinson said. “The number of units on the skilled nursing side is going down, so if we can get through this very, very difficult year and a half and what should be very difficult nine to 12 months, we’ll be fine.”


Vaccination mandates hit US amid historic health worker shortage


Nearly one in four beds is empty at the TaraVista Behavioral Health Center in central Massachusetts, not for lack of patients, but for understaffing.

Even before the pandemic, the lowest-paid nurses and caregivers were still in short supply, but the 116-bed facility could still function at full capacity, said chief executive Michael Krupa. In similar hospitals in Massachusetts, hundreds of beds cannot be filled and “the reason is exclusively the staff,” he said.

What some are calling the worst healthcare job crisis in the United States in memory heightens concerns about the attrition of resistance to vaccination warrants – even in Massachusetts’ medical mecca, where COVID cases – 19 remain well within the capacity of hospitals. According to the US Department of Health and Human Services, about 16% of US hospitals were experiencing a critical staff shortage as of October 1.

The rise initially coincided with an increase in hospitalizations for COVID-19, but shortages have persisted even as the virus recedes, suggesting other factors.

“We don’t have a single position we can afford to lose right now,” Eric Dickson, president of UMass Memorial Health, told Bloomberg Radio last month. “I have neighborhoods that have a vacancy rate of 50%. And God forbid, we lose more.

In recent weeks, labor shortages have resulted in extreme measures, even in areas that are not COVID-19 hotspots. In Virginia, five state mental hospitals have had to stop accepting patients. A shortage of nurses has forced the Rhode Island hospital to shut down part of its emergency department. And a major Michigan hospital chain says 5% of its beds cannot be filled due to understaffing.

At TaraVista, a modern building with airy hallways and large windows, demand for psychiatric and drug beds is skyrocketing amid the heightened emotional stress and substance use of the pandemic. “Parents call me crying, ‘Please take my child,’” said Sheila Crowley, director of admissions. It hurts to refuse them, she said.

All at once

Historically, severe health workforce shortages have occurred in dispersed areas and hard-to-hire sectors like nursing homes, said Karen Donelan, professor of health policy at the ‘Brandeis University. But “at this point we hear about it in most states,” she said, and even in the big, wealthy institutions that have not traditionally struggled.

Factors include retirements and quits motivated by burnout; absences due to illness and quarantine; immigration limits in recent years; and the attractiveness of lucrative “travel” contracts from competing employers across the country. Now add vaccine resistance to the mix.

“All of these challenges at the same time,” Donelan said.

A nurse watches protesters gather outside Massachusetts State House in Boston to protest the COVID-19 vaccine and mask warrants. | AFP-JIJI

Salaries for nurses have remained relatively stable for many years after adjusting for inflation, she said, and salaries for less skilled jobs have also stagnated. The country has nearly 4 million nurses and the supply has grown steadily over the past decade, she said. Demand, driven by an aging population, has also increased and is expected to accelerate over the next decade.

In some markets, increases and bonuses in response to the pandemic may represent a long-term correction, Donelan said, although it is not yet clear.

Overall, employment in the health care sector remains below pre-pandemic levels. The gaps are greatest in nursing homes and care facilities: Nursing facilities employed about 14% fewer people in August than in January 2020, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In residential mental health facilities, the decrease is 8%.

Doctors’ offices employ roughly the same number of workers as before the pandemic, while employment in laboratories and dental offices has increased.

Empty beds

In the hardest-hit settings, hospital and health agency leaders are experiencing the worst staff shortages in four decades. At a Massachusetts law hearing last month, officials said at least one in five jobs caring for people with disabilities and in nursing homes was unfilled.

Other sectors of work, such as tourism and catering, are also experiencing labor shortages, but “the consequences are different,” said Michael Weekes, president of an association of service providers in the city. anybody.

“While it can be disappointing for someone to wait for a lobster roll or an ice cream cone, or to wait longer for their hotel room, when essential staff are absent from social services, security and the health of clients and residents is immediately there. risk, ”he said.

In behavioral health – which includes psychiatric care and addictions – at least 400 beds statewide remain empty, while several hundred patients are forced to inappropriately ‘board’ for days in wards. emergency or medical services.

300 more psychiatric beds are expected to come online this year, but “the big question is where will the staff come from? said David Matteodo of the Massachusetts Association of Behavioral Health Systems.

More than half of the state’s nursing homes have had to stop accepting new residents intermittently, according to Massachusetts Senior Care Association president Tara Gregorio. She called on foreign workers to fill the void.

State officials are allocating $ 31 million to strengthen the behavioral health workforce, along with tens of millions more to deal with the larger crisis.

Desperate measures

So far, aside from government financial assistance, employers have been largely left to their own desperate means to retain and hire staff.

At TaraVista in central Massachusetts, CEO Krupa estimates the hospital is investing an additional $ 1 million per year in salaries, improved benefits, bonuses and other sweeteners for 310 employees there and in a hospital. partner. Overtime has doubled from around 3% of pay to 6%.

When asked if he had ever seen such big loyalty bonuses and increases, he replied, “dramatically, emphatically no, no, no”. Krupa is determined to have enough staff to fill all the beds by the end of the year, he said – even if that means recruiting and housing workers from out of state or even d ‘other countries. He sees the longer term solution in higher payments by insurers and great potential in forgiveness of student loans.

The hospital’s vaccination mandate will begin on November 1, he said, and “I hope we don’t lose a lot of staff. But I know we’re going to lose some.

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Crisis care standards now active for 20 healthcare facilities across Alaska


After weeks of rising COVID-19 cases and a wave of hospitalizations that have strained state hospitals, 20 healthcare facilities in Alaska are now operating to crisis care standards.

Switching to crisis standards is often seen as the worst-case scenario. They are intended to provide both guidance and liability protection for healthcare workers who work with extremely limited resources.

The 20 hospitals that have requested crisis standards represent the majority of Alaska’s 31 health facilities (a total that includes hospitals and nursing homes), and they cover almost every region of the state – on the road network and off, from southeast to northwest Alaska. to Bristol Bay and along the Railbelt.

Heidi Hedberg, director of the state’s Public Health Division, said in an interview on Saturday that the move to crisis standards is a sign that hospitals are moving closer to making extremely difficult decisions about patient care, calling the changes in Alaskan hospitals lately. weeks “a slow progression”.

These hospitals are “really tipping further and further into the space where … they have to call on this triage team to make a clinical decision, which hasn’t happened before.”

The application of crisis care standards varies considerably from facility to facility and does not always mean that they are rationing care. In many cases, activating crisis standards is seen as a preventative measure, Hedberg said.

Some of the hospitals now under crisis standards had said, “We want to know that we have this responsibility, so at 2 a.m. if we’re going to get our triage team together and use the state document, we’ve got it. “in place, according to Hedberg.

Alaskans should know that the move doesn’t mean care is no longer available in hospitals – and they shouldn’t delay seeking important medical attention when they need it.

“The people of Alaska are going to get care, but it may not be the care they need,” she said. “The resources they need may not be there. “

“A heavy psychological burden”

Alaska hospitals have been operating under high stress levels for months. Amid the country’s strongest coronavirus wave, the state’s limited healthcare system is particularly vulnerable due to its isolation and large rural population.

“Right now we have five times the national average of cases, which is reflected in our hospitalizations, but we have one of the most limited healthcare systems,” Hedberg said.

In recent weeks, some impacts on care have included limited kidney dialysis therapy, a shortage of oxygen supply, staff shortages, and difficulties in transferring patients from rural communities as Anchorage hospitals have been particularly filled with critically ill patients in recent months.

[Are Alaska’s hospitals short-staffed over COVID-19 vaccination mandates? Not yet.]

Triage teams in hospitals are made up of clinical ethicists, medical ethicists, and sometimes pastors. They exist to help physicians make difficult decisions.

“There is a heavy psychological burden for these doctors who treat patients at the bedside when they do not have enough resources,” Hedberg said.

“If a doctor says, ‘I have two patients and I have a resource. What do I do?’ They have to go to this triage committee, and this triage committee will look at the information and help make a decision, so it’s not on the shoulders of this bedside doctor, ”she said.

Hedberg said she has only heard of three examples so far in recent weeks of an Alaskan doctor facing a tough decision over resource allocation.

The 20 institutions involved include: Alaska Native Medical Center; Alaska Regional Hospital; Bartlett Regional Hospital; Bristol Bay Area Health Corp./Kanakanak Hospital; Central Peninsula Hospital; Cordoba Community Medical Center; Fairbanks Memorial Hospital; Maniilaq Health Center; Mat-Su Regional Medical Center; Norton Sound Health Corp .; St. Petersburg Medical Center; Providence Alaska Medical Center; Providence Kodiak Island Medical Center; Providence Seward Medical Center; Providence Valdez Medical Center; SEARHC / Mt. Edgecumbe; Southern Peninsula Hospital; Elias Specialized Hospital; Wrangell Medical Center; and Yukon Kuskokwim Health Corp.

Flexibility and search for resources

Several of these health facilities had already adopted crisis care standards specific to their facilities.

Providence Alaska Medical Center moved up to crisis standards early last month. This week, the Alaska Native Medical Center and hospitals in Bethel, Kodiak and Fairbanks also made the switch.

[Alaska reports over 1,000 COVID cases Friday as ANMC shifts care standards, gets help from Outside workers]

In Providence, “crisis care” has meant occasional rationing of treatment and the use of state guidelines and an in-house triage team to make difficult care decisions if necessary. At the Alaska Native Medical Center, the decision to switch to crisis standards was primarily made to allow more flexibility for providers.

For those 20 facilities, the crisis care standards “will remain in effect until there are sufficient resources to provide the usual standard of care to all patients,” the health department said. State in a press release.

To deal with staffing shortages at many Alaskan hospitals, the state signed a federal contract to bring in about 470 health care workers from outside. They started arriving this week.

The state also recently ordered five dialysis machines from the national stockpile as well as more oxygen, and continues to do everything possible to avoid another crisis, Hedberg said.

At the start of the pandemic, hospitals in Alaska worked together to draft the Crisis Care Standards Guidelines, which break down specific topics around resources, including oxygen, personnel, nutritional support and drug administration.

It wasn’t until last month, when the increase in COVID-19-related hospitalizations overwhelmed the state’s healthcare system, that the document came into play. The state authorized crisis standards in a addendum to an emergency public health order.

When healthcare facilities reach a point of extreme stress, they now have the option of appealing to the Alaska Health Commissioner and the state’s Crisis Care Committee, which is made up of 15 physicians and health officials. the health of tribal and non-tribal state hospitals. The state can then approve requests from hospitals to activate crisis standards.

“This is what happened yesterday,” Hedberg said.

A “very fluid” situation and “a very serious push” in Fairbanks

Foundation Health Partners, which operates Fairbanks Memorial Hospital, said on Friday it had activated crisis care standards due to a “critical lack of resources,” including staff, available beds and options for transferring to d other establishments.

“Switching to crisis care standards is not something we take lightly,” said Dr. Angelique Ramirez, chief medical officer of Foundation Health Partners, which also operates the Tanana Valley Clinic and the Denali Center. “This is in response to a very serious wave of COVID in our community. “

Health organization Fairbanks also referred to a shortage of monoclonal antibody therapy, which health officials say is a very effective treatment for people at high risk with COVID-19 early in their illness. although they stressed that it does not replace vaccination. .

Other factors involved in the decision, according to Ramirez, include “community spread driven by low vaccination rates and low use of masks,” a high number of patients and the acuity of hospital patients.

About one in three patients hospitalized at Fairbanks Memorial Hospital on Friday tested positive for COVID.

[’Watching themselves die’: Fairbanks nurse describes panic and ‘air hunger’ among COVID patients in video encouraging vaccination]

The move to crisis standards “has an impact on all patient care, those with broken bones, trauma, heart attacks, strokes, COVID, anyone in need of medical attention could be affected,” Ramirez said. “The care that we are able to provide is very fluid and can change from day to day and even hour to hour depending on the availability of resources within our system and across the state.”

The borough of Fairbanks North Star is one of the least vaccinated areas in the state, with about 52% of residents fully vaccinated. Acting University of Alaska President Pat Pitney said in a letter Friday that University of Alaska Fairbanks Chancellor had asked him to consider approving a vaccine requirement for staff and staff. in-person students at its Fairbanks sites. An update is expected within two weeks.

Health officials continue to encourage people to wear masks in public, get vaccinated if possible, and get tested if symptoms of COVID-19 develop.


Class action brought against nursing home owner by underpaid workers

0


NEW ORLEANS – A new lawsuit has been filed against Bob Dean, who decided to evacuate residents of a nursing home to a warehouse in Independence. The complaint was brought by nurses who were not paid for the care they provided during Hurricane Ida.

WWL reported the lawsuit was filed in Jefferson Parish by five employees of South Lafourche Nursing & Rehab. Employees said they were promised a pay rise for working during the hurricane.

The lawsuit said staff members received an email before the hurricane, informing employees that their wages would range from $ 750 to $ 3,000 per day.

WWL said Janice Verdin, a complainant in the case, worked nearly 100 hours over the five days at the facility. She stated that her regular rate would be $ 2,250 per day and that she should have been paid approximately $ 11,250 for her five days at the warehouse.

On September 15, Verdin received a check for $ 3,770.32. According to WWL, other employees have reported similar complaints.

The WBRZ investigation unit reported that at least 50 911 calls were made from the warehouse as a result of Ida. When state inspectors showed up, they were turned away from the facility.

The state health department has since withdrawn the licenses of the seven nursing homes that were evacuated there. The Louisiana attorney general’s office is also leading an investigation into what happened.


Vaccine mandates struck amid historic shortage of health workers


The rise initially coincided with an increase in hospitalizations for Covid-19, but shortages have persisted even as the virus recedes, suggesting other factors.

“We don’t have a single position we can afford to lose right now,” Eric Dickson, president of UMass Memorial Health, told Bloomberg Radio last month. “I have neighborhoods that have a vacancy rate of 50%. And God forbid, we lose more.

In recent weeks, labor shortages have resulted in extreme measures, even in areas that are not Covid hotspots. In Virginia, five state mental hospitals have had to stop accepting patients. A shortage of nurses forced the Rhode Island hospital to shut down part of its emergency department. And a major Michigan hospital chain says 5% of its beds cannot be filled due to understaffing.

At TaraVista, a modern building with airy hallways and large windows, demand for psychiatric and drug beds is skyrocketing amid the increased emotional stress and substance use of the pandemic. “Parents call me crying, ‘Please take my child,’” said Sheila Crowley, director of admissions. It hurts to refuse them, she said.

All at once

Historically, severe health workforce shortages have occurred in dispersed areas and hard-to-hire sectors like nursing homes, said Karen Donelan, professor of health policy at the ‘Brandeis University. But “at this point we hear about it in most states,” she said, and even in large, wealthy institutions that have not traditionally struggled.

Factors include retirements and quits motivated by burnout; absences due to illness and quarantine; immigration limits in recent years; and the attractiveness of lucrative “travel” contracts from competing employers across the country. Now add vaccine resistance to the mix.

“All of these challenges at the same time,” Donelan said.

Salaries for nurses have remained relatively stable for many years after adjusting for inflation, she said, and salaries for less skilled jobs have also stagnated. The country has nearly 4 million nurses and the supply has grown steadily over the past decade, she said. Demand, driven by an aging population, has also increased and is expected to accelerate over the next decade.

In some markets, increases and bonuses in response to the pandemic may represent a long-term correction, Donelan said, although it is not yet clear.

Overall, employment in the health care sector remains below pre-pandemic levels. The gaps are greatest in nursing homes and care facilities: Nursing facilities employed about 14% fewer people in August than in January 2020, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In residential mental health facilities, the decrease is 8%.

Doctors’ offices employ roughly the same number of workers as before the pandemic, while employment in laboratories and dental offices has increased.

Empty beds

In the hardest-hit settings, hospital and health agency leaders are experiencing the worst staff shortages in four decades. At a Massachusetts law hearing last month, officials said at least one in five jobs caring for people with disabilities and in nursing homes was unfilled.

Other work sectors, such as tourism and catering, are also experiencing labor shortages, but “the consequences are different,” said Michael Weekes, president of an association of service providers in the city. anybody.

“While it can be disappointing for someone to wait for a lobster roll or an ice cream cone, or to wait longer for their hotel room, when essential staff are absent from social services, security and the health of clients and residents is immediately there. risk, ”he said.

In behavioral health – which includes psychiatric care and addictions – at least 400 beds statewide remain empty, while several hundred patients are forced to inappropriately ‘board’ for days in wards. emergency or medical services.

300 more psychiatric beds are expected to come online this year, but “the big question is where will the staff come from? said David Matteodo of the Massachusetts Association of Behavioral Health Systems.

More than half of the state’s care facilities have had to stop accepting new residents intermittently, according to Massachusetts Senior Care Association president Tara Gregorio. She called on foreign workers to fill the void.

State officials are allocating $ 31 million to strengthen the behavioral health workforce, along with tens of millions more to deal with the larger crisis.

Desperate measures

So far, aside from government financial assistance, employers have been largely left to their own desperate means to retain and hire staff.

At TaraVista in central Massachusetts, CEO Krupa estimates the hospital is investing an additional $ 1 million per year in salaries, improved benefits, bonuses and other sweeteners for 310 employees there and in a hospital. partner. Overtime has doubled from around 3% of pay to 6%.

When asked if he had ever seen such big loyalty bonuses and increases, he replied, “dramatically, emphatically no, no, no”. Krupa is determined to have enough staff to fill all the beds by the end of the year, he said – even if that means recruiting and housing workers from out of state or even d ‘other countries. He sees the longer term solution in higher payments by insurers and great potential in forgiveness of student loans.

The hospital’s vaccination mandate will begin on November 1, he said, and “I hope we don’t lose a lot of staff. But I know we’re going to lose some.

© 2021 Bloomberg LP



Illinois Court Says Nursing Home Lawsuit Wrongly Sent to Arbitration

0


By Jonathan Capriel (October 1, 2021, 7:00 p.m. EDT) – An Illinois state appeals court has revived a lawsuit alleging that a long-term living facility, one of its nurses, and her Chicago-based parent company are responsible for a former hip fracture of a resident, ruling that there remains a question whether the patient was competent enough to sign an arbitration agreement.

A three-judge panel on Thursday overturned a Cook County court decision to refer arbitration claims filed by Antwine Kizart, who alleges years of abuse at Heather Health Care Center Inc. , which is operated by Alden Management Services. He says he needed hip surgery after a fall in 2018 in …

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As Philly vaccination deadline approaches, thousands of home health workers have yet to receive doses


Thousands of home helpers in Philadelphia remain unvaccinated, making it unlikely that many in the industry will get vaccinated in time to meet the city’s Oct. 15 vaccination mandate for workers in the city. health.

“The numbers are pretty low and pretty striking,” said Teri Henning, executive director of the Pennsylvania Home Care Association. “There is a lot of work to be done in a very short period of time.

The mandate requires, with few exceptions, that anyone working in health care in the city be vaccinated before the deadline. Immunization figures are so low that the industry is seeking an extension of the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. It’s a possibility, spokesman James Garrow said, but wondered if more time would make a difference.

“Given that the deadline was announced on August 13, giving people more than two months to get vaccinated,” he said, “it could be questionable that an extension at this point will cause people to to act”.

Home health care may include skilled nursing, palliative care caregivers, and home health aides who do not have specific medical training, and it is the latter group that is of particular concern, Henning said. There is no precise vaccination count among them, but she said conversations with vendors and business owners indicated that about half of the city’s roughly 50,000 assistants had not been vaccinated. The people they serve are some of the city’s most vulnerable, and many are at risk of the worst effects of COVID-19 due to age, illness or disability.

READ MORE: Faced with COVID and civil unrest, Philly home health workers still show up for risky work

The Philadelphia Department of Public Health has recognized the large number of home care workers who are not vaccinated. Some nursing homes had also done no better than fully immunizing about half of their employees, Garrow said, although the median vaccination rate among the city’s nursing homes was 74%.

A handful of major Philadelphia nursing homes did not respond to calls for information on their immunization rates.

In Pennsylvania, which does not have a vaccination mandate for healthcare workers, about 65% of nursing home workers are vaccinated, roughly the same national vaccination rate for these workers. A federal immunization mandate for all Medicare and Medicaid-certified health facilities is expected to be finalized in October.

The city’s mandate has so far garnered mixed compliance. Several large hospital systems – some of which have imposed warrants in front of the city – have already reported more than 90% of their workers vaccinated.

Unless unvaccinated workers decide to take the Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine by Friday, they will not meet the city’s October 15 deadline. Even if a worker were given an injection of the two-dose vaccine options, Moderna or Pfizer, on Friday, that person would not receive their second dose before the deadline.

“We are more concerned about the low immunization rates in nursing homes due to the high rates of hospitalizations and deaths that occurred at these facilities earlier in the pandemic,” Garrow said.

The city is not hosting any clinics for the next two weeks specifically aimed at healthcare providers, but Garrow noted that there are 350 vaccination sites throughout the city, and many of them allow people to be vaccinated. without an appointment.

The warrant allows for exemptions based on documented health or religious issues, and exempt workers could wear masks and undergo frequent testing instead.

Home care agencies fear their staff will be emptied.

“I honestly believe I would lose 50% of my workforce,” said Michael Spivak, general manager of All American Home Care, which includes a Philadelphia site employing approximately 1,000 people.

Spivak applauded the mandate when the city announced it in August. He was happy that this removed the burden on business owners to require vaccination, and believed it would quickly increase vaccination rates. It didn’t work that way, he said.

“I really thought it would start with the city, then other cities would pick it up, then the state would pick it up, and then they wouldn’t have a choice,” Spivak said.

Providers have made efforts to get the doses accepted by unvaccinated workers. Lolita Owens, a home health aide at Liberty Resources Home Choices and a representative for SEIU, the union that represents some health workers, had one-on-one conversations with colleagues to encourage vaccination. She herself hesitated when the vaccine was first available, she said. Two people she cares about convinced her that the shot was safe and necessary.

“When you walk in and out of people’s homes, when you go to work with your coworkers,” she said, “you should be vaccinated, not just for yourself, but for them as well. “

READ MORE: Healthcare and higher education workers, students to get vaccinated by mid-October, Philadelphia announces

Owens hears colleagues say they don’t want to be vaccinated for religious reasons, but few have expressed fear of the vaccine. Many just don’t want to be told what to do.

“I heard someone say, ‘Why are they trying to tell me what to do with my body?’ “she said.” I think they realize [having COVID-19] maybe it can be that bad, but then you’ve got people who might be like, “well, i’m gonna take this chance”. Or even you got some that say ‘I won’t be the only one to have [sick] because I do this, that and the third to take care of myself. “

Liberty has held a raffle to encourage vaccination, Owens said, and expects to have two more before the deadline. Spivak is partnering with a vaccine supplier to host a clinic in his office, he said.

Home care providers, Henning said, have spoken with the city’s health department about the extension.

The mandate as it stands, she said, “would leave a huge number of caregivers unable to work.”

Anyone wishing to be vaccinated in the city can visit phila.gov/vaccine or vaccines.gov.

Editors Jonathan Lai, Justine McDaniel and Erin McCarthy contributed to this report.


Houma nursing home trial claims evacuation resulted in death of resident

0


Three children of a resident of the Houma retirement home who died after being evacuated to a warehouse in Tangipahoa parish during Hurricane Ida filed a complaint against the establishment and its owner.

Thomas Becnel Jr., Darren Becnel and James Becnel filed the complaint Friday at the parish of Terrebonne on behalf of their late father, Thomas Becnel Sr., who resided at Maison DeVille in Houma, according to court records.

Thomas Becnel Sr. died on August 30, a day after the Category 4 hurricane made landfall and left a trail of destruction in Terrebonne and Lafourche, according to the prosecution.

This is the latest in several lawsuits against seven nursing homes and their owner, Bob Dean Jr. of Baton Rouge. At least seven evacuation-related deaths have been reported. Lawsuits brought by the families of those who died allege that the evacuees endured inhumane conditions, including being forced to sleep on concrete floors as water began to seep into the building.

The lawsuits allege that more than 800 nursing home residents and staff survived the hurricane as conditions began to deteriorate.

Following:Hundreds of nursing home residents will remain evacuated until Houma hospitals come back online

“During the botched evacuation, Thomas Becnel Sr. was neglected and his medical needs were not met, which ultimately resulted in his untimely death,” says the latest trial. “The immediate, contributory and legal cause of injury and death of Thomas Becnel Sr. includes the negligent, serious and criminal action and / or inaction of Bob Dean Jr., as owner and operator of Maison DeVille Nursing. Home. The plaintiffs and their deceased relatives were not at fault.

Thibodaux’s attorney, Matt Ory of AMO Trial Lawyers, who represents the plaintiffs, said Dean was personally responsible for the unfortunate evacuation and the way it was carried out by staff at his seven nursing homes .

“Unfortunately for Mr. Becnel and the other residents, Dean appears to have put safety first and acted with complete disregard for the health and well-being of Becnel and the other residents,” Ory said. “Dean ignored an evacuation plan that had previously been submitted by his nursing homes to the (Louisiana Department of Health), and in the end, his conduct resulted in the deaths of many residents. We believe that Mr. Dean’s conduct was so abhorrent as to amount to the level of criminal negligence, and Mr. Becnel’s death was homicide by criminal negligence.

The lawsuit accuses Dean of not having:

  • Evacuate Maison DeVille in complete safety.
  • Follow the evacuation plan previously approved by the Ministry of Health.
  • Adequately supervise the evacuation.
  • Contact the family of Thomas Becnel Sr.
  • Have adequate caregivers and supplies at the warehouse
  • Use safe work practices and provide appropriate supervision for those working in the warehouse.

The plaintiffs are asking for a jury trial.

Baton Rouge attorney John McLindon, who represents Dean, said the Louisiana Department of Health approved the evacuation plan before the storm made landfall.

“The LDH had employees at the facility on August 27 and 28, two days and one day before the hurricane made landfall,” McLindon said in a telephone interview Thursday. “The LDH checked and said in their report that there were lots of supplies, water and everything looked fine. And then, unfortunately, the storm moved east and passed through Independence, Louisiana, where the facility was located. This caused some issues, but I don’t think they are as bad as described.

Following:‘I’m still crying’: family members heartbroken by nursing home evacuation

McLindon said tough decisions were made quickly to protect the evacuees from the dangerous storm.

“There were three buildings where people were staying,” he said. “Once they realized the storm was right on them, the administrators made the decision to get everyone into the safest building. You are damned if you do and damned if you don’t. They were forced to make decisions in a very tense and rapidly changing situation. ”

The plan Dean submitted to the state is not the one he implemented, Ory said.

Also:Lawyer for Nursing Home Owner Says Reports of Horrible Conditions “Greatly Exaggerated”

“State regulators have done their job on this matter,” Ory said. “The system has not failed; on the contrary, Mr. Dean blatantly flouted the rules, including ignoring a plan he had previously drafted and submitted, and his criminal negligence led to this tragedy. In order to prevent something like this from happening again, the community must see Mr. Dean paying for his actions. Hopefully, the deterrent effect of financial ruin will discourage anyone tasked with caring for our elderly citizens from trying to cut corners on a future evacuation. Profit should never compromise care.

– Editor-in-Chief Dan Copp can be reached at 448-7639 or dan.copp@houmatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter @DanVCopp.


PHYSICIANS AND WHAT THEY DO Access to convenient health care


With the push of a button, people can request a ride, shop, or have dinner delivered to their doorstep. It’s safe to say that we live in an increasingly on-demand world and the healthcare industry is no exception. Patients expect more from providers than good care. They also want ease, convenience and choice. Heartland Regional Medical Group medical experts, in partnership with Marion Republican, present: Doctors and What They Do. This month, we’re taking a closer look at the ways southern Illinois consumers can easily access health care and medical information.

Express care or urgent care

Many Americans today report that they have not been able to see a primary care physician for a variety of reasons, including simply not yet joining one. At the same time, interest in affordable, on-demand emergency or express care clinics has grown rapidly. As a result, emergency care centers play an increasingly vital role in the continuum of care.

A local example is Heartland Regional’s Express Care clinic. Open 7 days a week, 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., specialists treat non-emergency illnesses and injuries that require primary or acute medical care. The clinic also offers a wide range of routine medical services, such as health examinations and medical examinations. No appointment necessary.

Located across from Krispy Kreme, on The Hill, in Marion. More information about Express Care is available online at www.HeartlandMedicalGroup.com.

Online appointment booking

Online appointment booking has become an increasingly important and expected part of people’s lives. Most Americans have experience planning online with trips and restaurants among the most commonly reported online planning experiences. Consumers expect the same service when it comes to making an appointment with their doctor.

By offering online scheduling, Heartland Regional patients can schedule appointments, both for primary care physicians and other medical specialists, even when the offices of the Marion-based provider are closed. Patients simply go to www.HeartlandAnytime.com, select a provider, and choose a time slot that fits their schedule. In addition to in-person visits, consumers can schedule a telehealth visit and speak to a provider from the comfort of their own homes via video chat.

24/7 nurse support lines

Health problems can arise at the most inconvenient times. Whether it’s 10 p.m. on a school night or 2 a.m. on a Saturday, consumers need answers now, not just when your doctor’s office is open. A proven service, the Nursing Advice Line, is an important way to get practical, evidence-based information and support when questions about symptoms or care arise. Locally, Heartland Regional’s toll-free nursing helpline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

“During the pandemic, patients across the country have struggled to decide whether to seek care,” said Crista Minnick, Heartland regional chief nurse. “This reluctance continues to cause ongoing complications for the many people who choose to delay care. Now, with our nurse helpline, those who have questions, about illness or injury, have a new 24/7 resource for answers. “

If you have medical questions and concerns, you can call the Heartland Regional 24/7 Nursing Hotline at (618) 226-5454 or visit www.MyNurseHelpLine.com.


Keep up to date: learn more about immunization warrants, nursing home closures, booster shots

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Just three days after New York State’s vaccination mandate went into effect for healthcare workers, Monroe County and health officials met on Thursday to brief residents on how systems have been affected.

Vaccination rate of hospital staff

In a statement released Thursday, the University of Rochester Medical Center said 96% of hospital employees were vaccinated, 3% had approved medical or religious exemptions and 1% of employees had resigned.

“We are delighted that such a high percentage of UR Medicine employees have chosen vaccination, which protects them individually against serious illnesses from COVID, while collectively protecting our patients, families and communities,” said Steven Goldstein, senior vice-president of URMC.

People with approved exemptions are required to undergo weekly COVID testing as well as daily symptom monitoring.

“We continue to encourage all eligible to be vaccinated, including staff members who currently enjoy a religious exemption or who have recently resigned and will be welcomed back,” Goldstein said.

At Rochester Regional Health, more than 99% of staff have been vaccinated, according to its chief medical officer, Dr Robert Mayo. Mayo said less than 1% of unvaccinated employees have about five days of administrative leave to reconsider getting vaccinated.

“Their employment would end if they didn’t follow the rules,” Mayo said.

At Monroe Community Hospital, the delay is a little more lenient. County manager Adam Bello is granting 30 days of unpaid administrative leave under which unvaccinated employees must be vaccinated to keep their jobs. Bello said 93.8% of MCH employees have been vaccinated, there has been one resignation and seven exemptions have been approved.

The impact of the retirement home

Health care officials have said that despite high employee vaccination rates, hospital systems are still understaffed in some areas, especially in nursing homes and rehabilitation centers.

According to URMC officials, 24 nursing homes in the Finger Lakes area have stopped accepting new patients. Officials said this was the result of previous staff shortages that had been compounded by the state’s mandate to vaccinate healthcare workers.

URMC chief medical officer Dr Michael Apostolakos said people waiting to enter nursing homes are causing overcrowding in hospitals.

“This results in a significant percentage of our beds being occupied,” said Apostolakos, “making it more difficult for patients to get through the emergency room and our hospital.”

UR Medicine hospitals have 55 patients awaiting discharge to a nursing home, and RRH has at least 60. “We continue to treat them, we continue to look for options,” said Dr. Robert Mayo, physician. head of RRH.

COVID-19 back-to-school protocol

The increase in COVID-19 cases among school-aged children is also causing local health systems to be stretched, officials said.

In an effort to reduce pressure on clinical facilities, the Monroe County Public Health Department is making it easier for sick students to return to school once they get better.

Public Health Commissioner Dr Michael Mendoza said students who were ill will not have to see their health care provider for clearance under certain conditions.

“As long as their symptoms are gone and they’ve tested negative with the correct test, they can go back to school after going back to school with algorithms,” Mendoza said.

He said the correct test is either the Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAAT) or the PCR test.

Rapid tests, Mendoza said, are not acceptable, according to state mandates. He said these tests have proven to be unreliable in areas with high or moderate transmission rates.

Recall shots

Monroe County will begin giving booster shots to residents 65 and older starting Friday, according to County Director Adam Bello. He said the third dose is by appointment and is only available at the County Fleet Center clinic and the downtown campus clinic at Monroe Community College.

Bello said more locations will become available as eligibility increases.

Appointments for a reminder can be made here or by calling 211.


California warrants increase vaccination rates among healthcare workers


“It has become a real challenge for some hospitals to have enough staff,” Ms. Emerson-Shea said, adding that her organization had asked the California Attorney General to investigate reports of price increases by agencies charging hospitals hundreds of dollars an hour. .

This week, state public health officials offered healthcare facilities a 45-day compliance grace period to address critical staff shortages caused by the warrant.

But California has generally taken a strong stance on pandemic health measures. At the onset of the crisis, the state was among the first to issue stay-at-home orders, and it was among the most aggressive in promoting masks and vaccinations.

Mr Newsom – who overcame a pandemic-fueled effort to remove him from office earlier this month – said this week the state was “in talks” with school districts over a demanding mandate that eligible students get vaccinated. This week, state health officials also extended the mandate of health workers to thousands of home health workers and health workers in centers for the elderly, centers for the disabled and hospices, giving them a deadline of November 30.

“This is a critically important mandate that helps keep everyone safe in our health care system, and it especially protects those who are critically ill and who depend on hospitals and other facilities for their health. protect their health, “Dr Tomás J. Aragón, the state’s director of public health, said in a statement, adding that health authorities are closely monitoring deadlines and” expect full compliance. “

Compliance appears to be the goal of the state’s largest healthcare employers. In Kaiser Permanente’s massive system, for example, more than nine in ten of California’s 216,000 employees and 23,000 physicians are fully vaccinated, a spokesperson for the system said. Two weeks ago, the vaccination rate for system workers was around 87%.

At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, about 97% of an estimated 17,000 employees are now vaccinated. Dr Jeffrey A. Smith, director of operations, said while most of the hospital’s staff and doctors were early adopters, up to 800 staff were vaccinated after the state’s tenure limited their options for working in other California hospitals.


INSIDE MY TOWER: Why would healthcare providers lie?



The press recently ran an opinion piece written by a man who implied health care providers are liars and quoted the story of intensive care nurse Emily Farness of a nurse writing farewell letters to a dying patient as proof that the hospital is not really in crisis.

I speak firsthand, as I have helped our intensive care team meet patient care needs through the team nursing model, both in December / January and again in August / September, the need currently continuing. Many of my peers and I worked overtime outside of our home department, week after week, to meet patient needs. I worked with a basic critical care RN who was on her 10th consecutive 12 hour shift and who was still sitting on the edge of the bed, holding a patient’s hand and treating that patient with dignity and compassion as he ended up with comfort-of-life care plans for the patient’s spouse as care was withdrawn.

I have also worked for years alongside the registered nurse mentioned in the story and know that nurse lost her remaining parent this year. His personal loss made him more in tune with the importance for his patient to say goodbye to him. This team of nurses put a lot of effort into taking the time to help a patient say goodbye to loved ones. Do you know why? Because we (the healthcare providers) are desperately trying to keep our empathy and our humanity alive during this overwhelming battle that seems to never end. We work tirelessly to give our patients the best of ourselves in sub-optimal conditions.

Some of our COVID-19 patients have been with us for weeks. Some get better, some die, some become widowed or widowed while in our care, and some are permanently disabled and will never return to the life they once knew. Working in intensive care right now is heartbreaking. Health care providers experience trauma and grief, lose sleep, and worry about their own loved ones. Then we quit work and many in our community insult us and neglect our eyewitness testimony.

I ask you why would health care providers lie? Distorting the situation would be of no use to us. There is no benefit in health care organizations reversing what really makes money – elective surgeries – in favor of housing critically ill patients for weeks at a time. Healthcare organizations everywhere are bleeding money to pay for larger tanks of oxygen, more equipment, increased pay for travel nurses or overtime for core staff and large amounts of costs. ‘individual protection equipment.

Health care providers have no reason to lie to you about what we see. We are human beings doing our best in a horrible situation. Please do not attack or insult us for doing our best to show compassion to our suffering and dying patients.

• • •

Shannon Kline, MSN, RN, is a nurse at Kootenai Health.


New York lawmakers want $ 4 billion nursing home victims compensation fund – The Madison Leader Gazette

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State lawmakers want to set up a massive $ 4 billion nursing home victim compensation fund to provide tax relief to thousands of families whose loved ones have died after contracting COVID-19 in nursing homes.

The legislation – sponsored by State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-The Bronx) and Assembly Member Ron Kim (D-Queens) – will allow families to submit claims to a victims’ compensation board. nursing homes and receive state payments.

The bill takes inspiration from the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund to help victims of terrorist attacks, including those who suffer health problems after inhaling the toxic stew from the World Trade Center towers that s ‘collapse.

Families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each loved one who dies from the virus, and spouses and dependents will each be able to receive a minimum payment of $ 100,000, Kim said.

“The Nursing Home Victims Justice Act will make it very costly for our state and the nursing home industry to commit seniors. At the height of the pandemic, it is quite clear that the only motivating factor of our state government was to protect the profits of the industry on the lives of people, ”Kim said.

“We need to make the cost prohibitive to others of harming the elderly. To do otherwise would be to normalize “reprieve” and to allow the complete abandonment and neglect of the elderly for the benefit of “productive members” of society.

Separately, the bill would extend the statute of limitations for civil claims and causes of action for bodily injury or death of nursing home residents linked to COVID-19, according to the memo.

A box with the cremated ashes of Dnynia Armstrong, a COVID-19 nursing home victim, is surrounded by baskets of pine cones depicting other nursing home victims, is on display in New York City on March 21, 2021.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig, File

“This bill sets out regulations to prevent future constraints on nursing home liability, ensuring that injustices of this nature will never happen again on such a scale in this state,” it read.

It’s unclear where the funding will come from in the state budget, but Kim said he plans to meet with Assembly leaders next month to discuss the bill.

More than 15,000 residents have died from COVID-19 in nursing homes since March 2020, but families have been unable to sue because a provision – drafted by the powerful hospital lobbying arm of state – backed by nursing home groups – has been slipped into the state budget granting health care facilities and workers’ liability immunity from negligence lawsuits.

Theresa Sari’s mother, Maria Sachse, was a nursing home resident who died of COVID-19.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig

Former Governor Andrew Cuomo later repealed the “Emergency or Disaster Treatment Protection Act” in April 2021 following outcry from lawmakers, lawyers and families.

But New York nursing home policy has been mired in controversy since the onset of the pandemic – an infamous order issued on March 25, 2020 banned nursing homes from denying admission or readmission of patients with coronavirus in hospitals and also banned them from testing residents for the deadly virus.

Although the order was revoked in May 2020, independent reports confirmed that its effect had resulted in “several hundred and possibly more than 1,000 deaths.”

State Senator Alessandra Biaggi, D-Bronx
State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-Bronx) is a co-sponsor of the legislation.
AP Photo / Hans Pennink

Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo – who resigned in disgrace last month following a damning report on sexual harassment released by investigators hired by State Attorney General Letitia James – has refused to release the number total deaths in long-term care facilities for months, excluding the number of residents who were transferred from their homes because they were so sick and later died in hospitals.

A lawsuit filed by the conservative Empire Center for Public Policy forced the state to release accurate data, and James’s office later released a report in January confirming the death toll was likely 50% higher than what was reported by the state health ministry.

Next, The Post exclusively reported that key Cuomo associates admitted to withholding data from the federal government because they “froze” and feared retaliation.

Deputy Ron Kim
Assembly member Ron Kim said families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each family member who died of COVID-19.
James Messerschmidt for NY Post

The shocking admission sparked an investigation into the case by the FBI and federal prosecutors in Brooklyn – which is apparently ongoing – as well as a key principle of an impeachment inquiry by the Assembly Judiciary Committee of the United States. State.

The body is expected to release a report in the coming weeks, according to Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-The Bronx).

Representatives of Governor Kathy Hochul, Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins ​​(Westchester) and Heastie could not be reached for immediate comment on the fund bill. compensation.


New York lawmakers want $ 4 billion nursing home victims compensation fund

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State lawmakers want to set up a massive $ 4 billion nursing home victim compensation fund to provide tax relief to thousands of families whose loved ones have died after contracting COVID-19 in nursing homes.

The legislation – sponsored by State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-The Bronx) and Assembly Member Ron Kim (D-Queens) – will allow families to submit claims to a victims’ compensation board. nursing homes and receive state payments.

The bill takes inspiration from the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund to help victims of terrorist attacks, including those who suffer health problems after inhaling the toxic stew from the World Trade Center towers that s ‘collapse.

Families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each loved one who dies from the virus, and spouses and dependents will each be able to receive a minimum payment of $ 100,000, Kim said.

“The Nursing Home Victims Justice Act will make it very costly for our state and the nursing home industry to commit seniors. At the height of the pandemic, it is quite clear that the only motivating factor of our state government was to protect the profits of the industry on the lives of people, ”Kim said.

“We need to make the cost prohibitive to others of harming the elderly. To do otherwise would be to normalize “reprieve” and to allow the complete abandonment and neglect of the elderly for the benefit of “productive members” of society.

Separately, the bill would extend the statute of limitations for civil claims and causes of action for bodily injury or death of nursing home residents linked to COVID-19, according to the memo.

A box with the cremated ashes of Dnynia Armstrong, a COVID-19 nursing home victim, is surrounded by baskets of pine cones depicting other nursing home victims, is on display in New York City on March 21, 2021.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig, File

“This bill sets out regulations to prevent future constraints on nursing home liability, ensuring that injustices of this nature will never happen again on such a scale in this state,” it read.

It’s unclear where the funding will come from in the state budget, but Kim said he plans to meet with Assembly leaders next month to discuss the bill.

More than 15,000 residents have died from COVID-19 in nursing homes since March 2020, but families have been unable to sue because a provision – drafted by the powerful hospital lobbying arm of state – backed by nursing home groups – has been slipped into the state budget granting health care facilities and workers’ liability immunity from negligence lawsuits.

Theresa Sari, left, and her daughter Leila Ali look at a section of a memorial wall
Theresa Sari’s mother, Maria Sachse, was a nursing home resident who died of COVID-19.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig

Former Governor Andrew Cuomo later repealed the “Emergency or Disaster Treatment Protection Act” in April 2021 following outcry from lawmakers, lawyers and families.

But New York nursing home policy has been mired in controversy since the onset of the pandemic – an infamous order issued on March 25, 2020 banned nursing homes from denying admission or readmission of patients with coronavirus in hospitals and also banned them from testing residents for the deadly virus.

Although the order was revoked in May 2020, independent reports confirmed that its effect had resulted in “several hundred and possibly more than 1,000 deaths.”

State Senator Alessandra Biaggi, D-Bronx
State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-Bronx) is a co-sponsor of the legislation.
AP Photo / Hans Pennink

Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo – who resigned in disgrace last month following a damning report on sexual harassment released by investigators hired by State Attorney General Letitia James – has refused to release the number total deaths in long-term care facilities for months, excluding the number of residents who were transferred from their homes because they were so sick and later died in hospitals.

A lawsuit filed by the conservative Empire Center for Public Policy forced the state to release accurate data, and James’s office later released a report in January confirming the death toll was likely 50% higher than what was reported by the state health ministry.

Next, The Post exclusively reported that key Cuomo associates admitted to withholding data from the federal government because they “froze” and feared retaliation.

Deputy Ron Kim
Assembly member Ron Kim said families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each family member who died of COVID-19.
James Messerschmidt for NY Post

The shocking admission sparked an investigation into the case by the FBI and federal prosecutors in Brooklyn – which is apparently ongoing – as well as a key principle of an impeachment inquiry by the Assembly Judiciary Committee of the United States. State.

The body is expected to release a report in the coming weeks, according to Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-The Bronx).

Representatives of Governor Kathy Hochul, Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins ​​(Westchester) and Heastie could not be reached for immediate comment on the fund bill. compensation.


Alaskan healthcare workers welcome COVID boosters amid nation’s worst wave


Alaska Native Medical Center nurse Rocky Carloni rolls up his sleeve before receiving a COVID-19 booster shot on Monday. (Nat Herz / Alaska Public Media)

Alaskan healthcare providers, facing an intense wave of COVID-19 that has engulfed state hospitals, say they are relieved and grateful for a decision by Dr Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which allows them to receive vaccine boosters.

Some experts have questioned Walensky’s decision last week that healthy people in high-risk jobs, in addition to the elderly and at-risk groups, can get the recalls if they choose.

Critics said Walensky’s decision, which struck down a divided CDC vaccine advisory committee, gave Americans too much leeway to research third vaccines before residents of poorer countries could get their first and last. created confusion over who qualifies.

But in interviews, many Alaskan healthcare providers said Walensky’s decision was in line with the demands and risks they took amid the country’s most intense outbreak of coronavirus cases and d hospitalizations. Some remote clinics also had doses close to their expiration date.

The Aleutian Islands community of Unalaska. (Berett Wilber / KUCB)

“It’s like your parents telling you to finish your dinner because there are starving children in Africa,” said Dr. Megan Sarnecki, medical director of the Aleutian Island clinic in Unalaska. . “You don’t send your leftovers to starving children in Africa. And we don’t send a vial of which we have only used half to a third world country.

A nationwide debate has been going on over the boosters for more than a month, since President Joe Biden announced that every adult would be entitled to one eight months after their original two-dose vaccine.

Subsequently, federal expert groups tasked with evaluating vaccines recommended them only for certain groups, with members expressing concerns about unnecessary injections and the lack of data showing clear benefits of allowing boosters for one group. most important.

While the Food and Drug Administration panel agreed to offer the injections to people in high-risk jobs, such as healthcare workers and teachers, the CDC’s expert panel was not to. agreed in a 9-6 vote last week. Members said they feared the move would distract the nation from distributing vaccines to the unvaccinated, which has a much higher public health benefit, and they also questioned whether the recommendations were too vague and did not enter into the public confidence.

“We might as well say give it to anyone 18 and over,” the Washington Post said, citing CDC panel expert, pediatrician Paul Sanchez. “We have a really good vaccine, and it’s like saying it doesn’t work, and it works.”

Walensky, the director of the CDC, announced her decision to step down from the panel on Friday, a day after her vote.

The agency’s final statement said people 65 and older, residents of nursing homes and people 50 and older with risky conditions “should” receive booster doses, while Younger people with underlying medical conditions and people in risky workplaces “could” receive the third injection.

The recommendations apply only to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine; the expert groups have yet to consider the issue of broad-based boosters for vaccines made by pharmaceutical companies Moderna and Johnson & Johnson.

While Walensky’s decision has drawn criticism from some academics and health care administrators, there has been little reaction in Alaska where the current outbreak is putting the state’s hospital system under intense pressure.

Administrators, already overworked on staff, said they did not want to risk losing more employees in groundbreaking COVID-19 cases. In Unalaska, when front desk staff at the clinic contracted the virus, the general manager spent a week answering phone calls, Sarnecki said.

Then there were the personal risks.

Dr. Thomas Kelley works in the intensive care unit at Alaska Native Medical Center. (Nat Herz / Alaska Public Media)

A recent shift in the intensive care unit at Alaska Native Medical Center was the “most difficult, grueling, depressing and saddest time I have ever experienced,” said the Dr Thomas Kelley in an interview this week outside a clinic where dozens of hospital workers had received their third injection.

“We just watched people die, no matter what we did,” Kelley said. “My reaction to the recommendations to have the booster was, ‘I just want the booster.’ I am terrified of what I see, I remain terrified of what I see, and I don’t scare easily.

There is data suggesting that boosters are safe, effective and may minimize the risk of COVID-19 either for people with health conditions or who face repeated exposure, said Dr Anne Zink, chief medical officer of Alaska. She said the CDC’s “permissive language” addresses concerns about legal protections and liability regarding booster doses and “allows individuals, in association with their health care provider, if necessary, to make that risk decision. -benefit “.

“I just think it really recognized the variety of scenarios and clinical situations that we see, the variety and diversity of the human experience and what we see with COVID as a whole,” Zink said in an interview. . “There are very few healthcare workers that I work with on a regular basis who did not eagerly await this information from the CDC, simply because they are seeing so much COVID right now and really want to do everything in their power. power to keep themselves, their families and their communities safe and healthy.

Zink said the Alaska Department of Health has debated whether to release its own recommendations breaking with the CDC’s panel of experts, although this is no longer necessary after Walensky’s decision, a- she added.

Many Alaskan hospitals and health systems had already started moving forward with booster doses for staff members before the CDC’s announcement.

In the central western Alaskan town of Nome, the tribal health organization, Norton Sound Health Corp, began handing out boosters to staff two weeks ago, after an earlier CDC recommendation that immunocompromised people should receive it.

“We are an incredibly rural and austere medical environment. It takes us a long time to get people in and out of here, ”said Tim Lemaire, a doctor with NSHC. “It will be interesting to see what the evidence shows in the long run. But for us, we thought it was the right call to at least offer it to everyone. “


Cattaraugus County Places 13 Unvaccinated Nursing Home Workers on Ineligibility Leave | New

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OLEAN – Thirteen employees at Pines Nursing Homes in Cattaraugus County refused to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before Monday’s deadline and were placed on ineligibility leave without pay for 60 days.

Eight employees are listed as unvaccinated at Machias Pines and five at Pines Nursing Home in Olean. There are 176 employees in Machias and 162 in Olean. Each retirement home has around 110 beds.

Twenty-seven other nursing home workers – 25 from Machias Pines and two from Olean – have applied for religious exemptions. Two others at Olean have requested medical exemptions.

A federal judge in Utica issued a restraining order last week and set an October 12 hearing on the issue of religious exemption for nursing homes and other healthcare workers that were not addressed in the state directive.

There are also eight health service workers currently classified as unvaccinated plus five who requested religious exemptions and one who requested medical exemption.

Health department workers face an Oct. 7 deadline to get their first dose of the vaccine under the state health department’s mandate.

County administrator Jack Searles said on Tuesday the county was offering the vaccine to all employees on all shifts until midnight Monday. Several employees took advantage of the last minute vaccination opportunity.

The county and its unions negotiated a memorandum of understanding on September 15 regarding the mandate to vaccinate healthcare workers. The parties agreed to a 60-day ineligibility leave without pay and to maintain health and dental insurance in effect. Employees could use vacation or other time off during the period. They will also continue to accumulate seniority.

Nursing home workers – unvaccinated and vaccinated – will continue to participate in testing twice a week.

Searles said county officials “strongly encouraged” employees to get vaccinated.

Nursing homes suspended new admissions earlier this month to see how the employee’s vaccination mandate would impact operations.

“We started off with a much higher number,” Searles said. The number has been reduced to 13, with 29 other employees seeking religious or medical exemptions.

“We’re always going to be understaffed at our facilities,” Searles said. Some employees, including licensed direct patient care staff, quit rather than get vaccinated.

The county hired three healthcare recruiting companies to help provide additional staff to Olean and Machias.

The MOU also provides for an increase of $ 5 per hour for eligible employees who continue to work, including overtime.

Searles said some employees who are not eligible to work in nursing homes could find employment in other county departments under a deal with the unions.

In addition, 65 county employees from other departments have volunteered to work shifts in nursing homes under overtime rules, Searles said.

According to Judge David Hurd’s rulings at the next hearing on the state’s lack of religious exemption in the state directive, the county may not be out of the woods just yet.

The county, he said, continues to compete with nursing homes, adult care facilities and assisted living facilities as well as other health facilities in the region for nurses and other employees.

Searles said county officials will have a conference call today with Gov. Kathy Hochul to discuss how the state can help counties and private nursing home operators across the state in the face of challenges. staff shortages during the vaccine tenure.

“Maybe we’ll learn more tomorrow,” Searles said.


US healthcare workers and nurses call for safe staff ratios


Following the reopening of schools in the United States in August and September, the latest wave of COVID-19 saw a wave of protests and strikes by healthcare workers against the horrific consequences of the pandemic’s handling of the epidemic. ruling class. Workers are ordered to return to work and all safety concerns have been put aside to secure profits. According to official figures – which are undoubtedly a vast underestimate – nearly 700,000 people have died from the disease in the United States alone. The normalization of deaths, seen by healthcare workers at unprecedented levels, has sparked massive discontent among these workers.

EMT Giselle Dorgalli, second from right, watches a monitor while performing chest compression on a patient who tested positive for coronavirus in the emergency room at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles. (AP Photo / Jae C. Hong, file)

No serious mitigation measures have been taken, let alone any effort to eliminate the pandemic. Hospitals and emergency rooms, which were already largely understaffed before the pandemic, have filled up to the point of being forced to turn away patients. Many no longer have beds and patients are forced to sleep in the hallways. Hospital staff are forced to use triage – to decide who gets care and who doesn’t, who lives and who might die – based on the limited resources they have. These morbid choices are among the main grievances raised by healthcare workers. The requirement for safe staffing ratios is essentially the requirement that the health system fulfill its official mission: to take care of the sick.

The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) chairs the staff of Sutter Delta Medical Center in Antioch, California, where healthcare workers voted to start a strike in October for safe staffing ratios. Sutter Delta spokesperson Marissa Currie responded to the strike announcement condescendingly, saying management and the union will continue to try to come to an agreement “to avoid a costly strike and stay focused on our commitment. common ground in patient care at a time when our communities need us most.

Jennifer Stone, an emergency technician at Sutter, said Beckers Hospital Examination, “We wear too many hats, we describe angry COVID patients, then we rush to a code, then we talk to family members who have just lost a loved one. We cannot provide adequate care. We are neglected and left to fend for ourselves, and we can no longer do everything.

This wasn’t the first eruption of anger among California healthcare workers over staffing ratios. In July, 1,400 nurses at USC Keck and USC Norris Cancer Hospital in Los Angeles held a two-day strike against dangerous staffing ratios.

SEIU has a long history of strangling the struggles of healthcare workers. In June alone, the SEIU called off three separate strikes by Connecticut nursing home workers. All of these strikes were motivated by the demand for secure staffing ratios.

The call for staff safety was also made at Mercy Hospital in Southern buffalo, new York, where workers were forced to work during lunch hours and breaks to make up for understaffing. On top of that, medical supplies are running out, a problem commonly reported by healthcare workers throughout the pandemic. New York has 2,410,000 recorded COVID-19 cases, with some 55,000 deaths and a 7-day average of 2,224 hospitalizations. Last year, at least 2,334 adults who died from COVID-19 were reportedly placed in a mass grave on Hart Island, and many bodies of deceased victims were stored in refrigerated trucks for long periods of time.

Oregon is now asking refrigerated trucks to store the multitude of bodies that have piled up due to “herd immunity” policies, which have allowed infections and deaths to spread freely. Hospitals in Oregon average 1,000 hospitalizations per day, with only 8% of beds available. A survey at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in the state showed that 42% of its resident nurses are considering leaving the profession due to the high burnout rate due to the pandemic. Nurses are trying to strike a new contractual deal as the current one expires on Thursday. Kaiser is only offering a meager 1% increase for all nurses and a 1% flat rate increase for each subsequent year of the contract.

Earlier this month, Alabama Resident Ray Martin DeMonia died of a cardiac event. He did not have COVID-19, but was turned away from 43 separate hospitals in three southern states seeking help for his condition. He died some 200 miles from his home in neighboring Mississippi, seeking a hospital capable of treating him.

Nurses at the University of Alabama Birmingham (UAB) hospital staged a one-day strike on September 6, saying they were “understaffed, overworked and underpaid” . About twenty employees of the emergency department showed up for their shift two hours late as a sign of solidarity. Dr Lindsey Harris, speaking on behalf of the Alabama Nursing Association, appealed to the university, saying that “if these issues are not addressed UAB and state hospitals risk losing their nurses for the benefit of jobs in other states “.

In Massachusetts, where there have been more than 800,000 recorded cases and 18,500 confirmed deaths, the longest nursing strike in state history continues at Saint Vincent Hospital at Tenet Healthcare in Worcester. Again, the primary demand of nurses is to have safe staffing ratios. While the Massachusetts Nurses Association (MNA) has negotiated for more than six months, behind closed doors, to reach a deal, nurses have yet to receive strike pay. Tenet called in 164 scabs in an attempt to replace the attackers for good. The MNA’s strategy has been to conduct protracted negotiations as the workers it nominally represents slowly starve on the picket lines.

Speaker of the House of Democrats Nancy Pelosi and U.S. Representative Jim McGovern met with the National MP earlier this month, the day after the sixth anniversary of the strike, to align with the union bureaucracy and position themselves as advocates for nurses. This follows several visits by Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren where she told nurses she would support them until Tenet makes a deal. These are representatives of the same party that called the National Guard for a nurses’ strike in Connecticut earlier this year and is now threatening to do the same in New York.

Healthcare workers are not only fighting COVID-19 and the private healthcare system, but also unions, who each time sabotage their struggles and work to prevent them from bonding with their siblings through the country. To advance their struggle, healthcare workers must break away from pro-corporate unions and form grassroots committees, unite internationally with workers from all industries to eradicate COVID-19 and end to the for-profit health system.


9 out of 10 hospital and nursing home staff vaccinated: Hochul

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HUDSON VALLEY, NY – As Governor Kathy Hochul announced that healthcare worker vaccination rates were rising rapidly across New York state before the vaccination mandate for healthcare workers in hospitals took effect and nursing homes, Patch commentators continued to discuss it.

“This new information shows that firmly holding the immunization mandate for healthcare workers is simply the right thing to do to protect vulnerable family members and loved ones from COVID-19,” Hochul said. “I am happy to see healthcare workers getting vaccinated to keep New Yorkers safe, and I continue to monitor developments and stand ready to take action to alleviate potential situations of staff shortages in our areas. health systems. “

  • The percentage of nursing home staff receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine rose to 92% on Monday evening, from 71% on August 24, when Hochul was sworn in.
  • The percentage of staff in adult care facilities receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine rose to 89% on Monday evening, from 77% on August 24.
  • The percentage of hospital staff receiving at least one dose was 92% on Monday evening based on preliminary self-reported data. The percentage of people fully vaccinated was 85% on Monday evening, up from 77% on August 24.

The data comes from a September 27 point-in-time survey of hospitals, nursing homes and adult care facilities by the New York Department of Health to determine the immunization status of workers in healthcare facilities.

“I can’t wait for New York’s health care system to collapse when it lays off 45,000 health workers!” Then I can watch all of the mandate colleagues cry on the sidewalk when hospitals turn them away or put them on a waiting list for treatment, ”says Will Norris.

But others supported the mandate.

“Patients come first,” said George Coniglio. “It’s one thing to put yourself in danger and your family in danger, but it is quite another to put patients at risk. We need staff who are ready to take on hospital missions.”


Facing Deadline, More NY Health Care Workers Get Vaccinated | News, Sports, Jobs


FILE – In this file photo from December 15, 2020, a droplet falls from a syringe after a person is injected with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a hospital in Providence, RI (AP Photo / David Goldman, File )

ALBANY (AP) – Thousands of healthcare workers in New York City facing either getting the COVID-19 vaccine or losing their jobs have received at least one dose as their worldwide mandate approaches State, according to state figures.

Hospital and nursing home workers had until Monday to get their first dose of vaccine under the new requirement, raising concerns among administrators that the reluctance could create dramatic staff shortages.

Gov. Kathy Hochul released figures Monday evening showing immunization rates are rising among the state’s 450,000 hospital workers and other healthcare workers. The figures were released as she signed an executive order giving her increased powers to address staff shortages.

As of Monday evening, 92% of nursing home staff had received at least one dose of the vaccine. And preliminary data showed that 92% of hospital staff were receiving at least one dose of the vaccine, the governor said.

State figures on Wednesday showed 84% of hospital workers were fully immunized.

The executive order allows out-of-state physicians, nurses and other health care professionals to practice in New York, facilitates retirees’ re-entry into the workforce, and allows physician visits to nursing homes by telemedicine.

Additionally, New York State Approved Providers without a current registration will be able to practice without penalty. And the order expands the roles of emergency medical technicians, for example by allowing basic paramedics to vaccinate and test for COVID-19.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press.

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NB Nursing Home Workers Call for Pay Rise to Help Staff Crisis

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MONCTON, NB – In a virtual press conference Monday, the union representing workers at several New Brunswick nursing homes urges Premier Blaine Higgs to address the current ‘staffing crisis’ in nursing homes in New Brunswick. Province.

The union is asking the Prime Minister to immediately increase their wages by $ 4 an hour. Sharon Teare, president of the New Brunswick Council of Nursing Home Unions, which represents 51 of the province’s 70 nursing homes, says several places in the province are operating with 50 percent of their staff or less, which does not not allow them to prioritize those entrusted to them.

“Now we’re at a point where retention and recruiting is crippling the industry and it can’t function anymore,” Teare said.

She said many staff members work double or triple shifts, while some show up for work injured.

According to Teare, the current average salary of a CUPE member working in a seniors’ residence in the province is $ 21.50.

CUPE New Brunswick communications representative Simon Oullette said “Members, workers are already voting with their feet, retiring early, having to take sick leave due to burnout or quitting altogether. field “.

At Monday’s press conference, workers explained how these issues not only affect them, but also the vulnerable people in their care.

” What’s going on? These residents who die alone and who are in palliative care because they do not have the hands to ensure that the palliative measures are applied. And this is not good. Residents do not eat breakfast due to lack of staff. “

The Department of Social Development responded to CTV’s request for a comment from the Premier by saying it takes the concerns raised by the NB Council of Nursing Home Unions very seriously and that the Department is working with its partners, including “the Department of Health and the Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labor, to examine potential solutions.”

“This is one of the reasons the government has increased its annual budget by $ 15 million to increase hours of care to 3.3 hours by April 2022.”

In its statement, the ministry also said: “In accordance with the six-year bargaining agreement, officially adopted in May 2019, a 5.5% salary increase was agreed over a four-year period – most retroactively. – for employees “.

But Teare believes the change must happen soon. Due to an extreme staff shortage, residents do not eat breakfast and cannot always wash themselves once a week, she said.

“Residents have the right to take a bath at least once a week, not every two weeks.”

Without a change or increase in wages, workers say they are afraid of the future.

“The cost of doing nothing is much higher than the cost of fixing the problem,” Oulette said.


LI health workers face layoff as vaccination mandate goes into effect


Dozens of Northwell Health employees were fired on Monday after refusing to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Health care workers in New York had until midnight to receive their first dose of the vaccine or face arrest.

“I appeal to all healthcare workers. First, those who got it – thank you. And for those who haven’t made that decision yet, please do the right thing,” the governor said. Kathy Hochul.

Some healthcare workers in Hauppauge say the mandate is unfair and devastating. They are demanding that the state take immediate action so that they do not lose their jobs for choosing not to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

“I don’t want to lose my job,” says TonyLunn Sterk, a registered nurse. “I’ve been there for 21 years. I want to work everyday. I didn’t run away when the pandemic hit. I stayed there alongside my frontline fighting staff and today we are considered zeros compared to the heroes of last year.

Other workers have expressed concerns about their patients in the hospital and their own ability to pay their bills if they lose their jobs.

Representative Lee Zeldin and other lawmakers called on Hochul to allow alternatives to the vaccine, such as wearing appropriate personal protective equipment and consistent testing, but the governor stood firm on the vaccine’s mandate on Monday.

“Can’t we just say it’s a basic human right,” Hochul said. “That anyone who enters a hospital or health facility will be treated by someone who has been vaccinated. ”

Northwell Health said it had already parted with two dozen unvaccinated executives and they would fire the rest of the unvaccinated employees as well.

Additionally, SUNY officials say those who have not received at least one dose of the vaccine in their hospital system to date will result in their immediate suspension and pending termination on Tuesday.

A spokesperson for NYU Langone said the hospital system is collecting data from all locations for accuracy and will report it once it’s completed.

Stony Brook University Hospital said on Monday afternoon that 90% of its employees had been vaccinated.

Unvaccinated employees have been suspended without pay and received an email after leaving work, stating in part: “Your continued presence at work represents a potential danger to the hospital, patients and the community and / or interferes seriously with our operations.

According to Mount Sinai South Nassau, about 87 employees remain unvaccinated and risk suspension without pay.

Catholic Health says unvaccinated employees will be put on leave for two weeks and then considered to have resigned if they are still unvaccinated.

Administrators of the Jewish Gurwin health care system in Commack said around 100 employees decided to get the vaccine in the days leading up to the deadline. The establishment claims to have lost 27 employees as a result of the mandate.

“It’s hard to lose staff,” says Stuart Almer of Gurwin Health Care System. “It’s a very difficult time for all of us in terms of recruitment and retention. ”

Hospital systems tell News 12 that patient care will not be affected.

An emergency room doctor told News 12 off camera that there would likely be some slowdown, but nothing that would threaten anyone’s safety.

Stony Brook Hospital could plan ahead as they are hosting a career fair next week.

All employees of hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of the vaccine to keep their jobs. The only way to get around this is to file a religious exemption.

News 12 awaits figures for the number of healthcare workers who will be out of work.

Some tell News 12 that they asked for an exemption and were denied.

Health care flies in the face of vaccines mandate, says it won’t give in to the pressure.

“We didn’t ask to be in this position, we were pushed into this position,” says Donna Aliperti, a nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit. “And we will not back down. “

Hochul says she is ready to help hospitals facing significant problems due to staff shortages. If the situation were so serious, a state of emergency could be declared and the National Guard could be brought in to help.

Nassau County Director Laura Curran says she believes hospital systems are ready to provide quality care with the mandate in place. She says that as a precaution, she activated the Nassau Emergency Management Office to stay in constant contact with hospitals and to help them with staff shortages.

NORTHWELL HEALTH FULL STATEMENT:

Northwell spent several weeks preparing for New York state’s mandate that all healthcare workers receive at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by September 27. But we are taking even stricter measures to keep our staff safe and, more importantly. , the well-being of our patients and the communities we serve. As a healthcare system, we are committed to immunizing all of our staff beyond the scope of the state mandate to include both our clinical and non-clinical staff. A few hundred unvaccinated leaders were contacted last week to take urgent action to get vaccinated. About two dozen of those who were still unvaccinated were taken out of the system. We are now beginning the process of discharging the rest of our unvaccinated staff. Northwell wants to reassure the public that during this time there will be no impact on the quality of patient care at any of our facilities. We are proud that our workforce is already nearly 100 percent vaccinated. As healthcare professionals and members of New York State’s largest healthcare provider, we have a unique responsibility to protect the health of our patients and that of others. We take care of sick people – some seriously ill – every day, and we are responsible for their safety in our car.



IDPH official discusses retirement home inspections and complaints

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EDWARDSVILLE – In regulating long-term care facilities and state nursing homes, the Illinois Department of Public Health conducts annual inspections at these facilities, and these inspections sometimes result in fines when violations are noted.

But fines can also be imposed following a complaint against an establishment if an investigation by the IDPH reveals that there have indeed been violations.

“We are reviewing what policies and procedures are in place and whether the facility has followed those policies and procedures,” said Melaney Arnold, public information officer for IDPH. “A type AA violation is the highest level of violation and normally results in serious injury or death. A Type A violation is the second most serious and involves a condition or event that has the probability of death or serious harm to a resident or has resulted in actual physical or mental harm.

“From there it goes down to types B and C and finally an administrative warning. A Type B violation means that there is a condition related to the operation of the installation which could potentially result in minimal physical or mental damage. “

She said the amounts of the fines are defined by law. “The fines are doubled for offenses with a high risk designation. This happens frequently.

After being cited with a violation by the HDI, depending on the severity of the violation, an institution is required to submit what is called a remediation plan, which details what it is doing to correct the deficiency.

“If there is a hole in these policies or procedures, they have to take care of what needs to be done,” Arnold said. “For example, if you had staff who were not following the correct procedure on something, you could take on-the-job training, so that they would then be aware of the latest policies and procedures.

“We do an annual inspection, but anyone can file a complaint at any time. If we find that the complaint is valid, we will go to the establishment and investigate. “

The COVID-19 pandemic has added an extra layer to an already complex system of nursing home inspections by the IDPH.

“There are annual inspections that take place in nursing homes that typically look at everything in the facility,” Arnold said. “When you have a complaint violation, it will review that specific complaint to see what policies and procedures are in place that could have prevented the violation from occurring to begin with.

“With COVID, there were special infection control investigations where we went to the facilities and specifically looked at the control procedures.”

The timeframe for the IDPH to investigate a suspected violation may vary.

“It depends on whether it’s an annual survey or a complaints investigation, and it may take a day or two to get into a facility or more, depending on what we find,” Arnold said. “After that, the investigative report goes back to a central office where it is reviewed to determine any shortcomings and any kind of citations or violations that we are going to publish.

“Once we have provided this information to the establishment, it must then come back to us with a correction plan if necessary. They have the ability to challenge the subpoenas that we issue, and it’s an administrative process similar to a civil court where you can request a hearing, and it can take several months.

To file a complaint with the IDPH about a retirement home, call the Central Complaints Registry hotline at 800-252-4343.


BaccMD graduate wants to serve marginalized populations, expand access to healthcare


Kassandra Jean-Marie, a second-year medical student whose journey to becoming a doctor has taken her twice through the halls of UMass Chan Medical School, wanted to be a doctor from an early age. Her reasons, however, have changed over the years, shaped by her parents’ experiences and her own observations. Jean-Marie was born in Boston; his parents were born in Haiti.

“I’m really passionate about people who don’t have access to health care, or their access to health care is very limited or segmented,” said Jean-Marie. “I think of my family members. The only time they’ve had a physical exam is when they absolutely have to do it for a new job. And then they ended up paying out of pocket because they didn’t have health insurance.

This passion drew Jean-Marie to the Population-based Urban and Rural Community Health (PURCH) track, an option for students at TH Chan School of Medicine that focuses on health care disparities and issues. health specific to urban and rural communities.

“We are getting information on how best to serve marginalized people, knowing that the health system has not always been kind to them,” said Jean-Marie. “How do you give access to health care to people who may not want to go to the hospital because they are afraid – if they do not have papers or a green card – that they will get deported? These people obviously deserve and still need health care, so what can we do to help them? “

Following the August 14 earthquake in Haiti, Jean-Marie organized a collection of bandages, soap, hand sanitizer and other supplies. In September, she was appointed to the Springfield COVID-19 Youth Council, where she is responsible for providing information and education on the COVID-19 vaccine to residents 35 and under. She volunteers at the student-run Worcester Asylum Clinic and Lawrence General Hospital. She is also a member of the Student National Medical Association (SNMA), a national organization that supports medical students from underrepresented minorities. She has been with SNMA since she was a student at UMass Amherst, where she obtained a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and public health. Having obtained his certification at the age of 17, Jean-Marie worked as a certified nursing assistant until college.

During the summers after his graduate years, Jean-Marie completed the UMass Baccalaureate MD Pathway program. The BaccMD program is open to students on UMass undergraduate campuses from racial or ethnic groups underrepresented in medicine, from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, or first generation graduates.

As for what comes after medical school, Jean-Marie is interested in infectious diseases and works in a community health setting with first and second generation American refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants. Or maybe she will end up working in primary care, maybe in Haiti or some other developing country.

“When we talk about many debilitating diseases, we are talking about the lack of primary care in many of these areas. These diseases, ultimately, are somewhat incurable. We can provide drugs and sometimes intervene, but the disease itself never goes away. And sometimes that’s because it’s taken too late. So primary care, I think, is just extremely important, ”said Jean-Marie.

The Student Spotlight series features students from UMass Chan Medical School in the Morningside Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Tan Chingfen Graduate School of Nursing and TH Chan School of Medicine. For more information about UMass Chan Medical School and how to apply, visit Future students page.

Related Articles on UMassMed News:
NBC10-Boston report highlights role of UMass BaccMD program in reducing health disparities
The summer enrichment program prepares undergraduate aspirants with a dose of rigor in medical schools


Louisiana officials grilled after botched evacuation of nursing home

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Louisiana lawmakers on Friday demanded responses from health officials about the poorly managed evacuation of the nursing home that left several dead and resulted in the revocation of their licenses at seven facilities.

The hearing is in response to outrage over the evacuation to a warehouse of more than 800 residents in anticipation of Hurricane Ida, The Daily Advertiser first reported. The residents were all from facilities owned by Baton Rouge developer Bob Dean, who also owned the warehouse. Health ministry officials called the conditions in the unsanitary warehouse “inhumane.”

The death toll among residents has since risen to 15. The state of Louisiana, in response to the evacuation, revoked licenses and terminated the state’s Medicaid provider agreements for the facilities.

Asked whether the warehouse only has portable toilets, regulatory affairs director Stephen Russo said the health department does not approve evacuation plans but revises them instead.

“I keep coming back to the nursing home who is responsible for the health and safety of their residents,” Russo said.

Lawmakers have signaled that stricter oversight may be underway for suppliers.

“It was a catastrophic failure,” said Republican Senator from Covington, Patrick McMath. “I think requiring a permanent toilet with disabled access at an evacuation site seems like common sense.”


New York expects healthcare worker shortage ahead of vaccination mandate deadline: NPR


A view of the entrance to Mount Sinai Hospital in New York on May 14, 2020. Employees of New York City hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by Monday , raising concerns about non-compliance and potential staff shortages.

Cindy Ord / Getty Images


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Cindy Ord / Getty Images


A view of the entrance to Mount Sinai Hospital in New York on May 14, 2020. Employees of New York City hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by Monday , raising concerns about non-compliance and potential staff shortages.

Cindy Ord / Getty Images

New York state officials brace for a staffing shortage when the mandate to vaccinate state health workers goes into effect Monday, and could look to the National Guard – as well as medical professionals other states and countries – to help them fix it.

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Saturday released a plan outlining steps she could take to increase staff in the event that large numbers of hospital and nursing home workers miss the state deadline.

“We are still in a battle against COVID to protect our loved ones, and we must fight with all the tools at our disposal,” she said.

That could mean declaring a state of emergency to allow licensed medical professionals outside of New York City, as well as recent graduates and retirees, to practice there. Other options include deploying medically trained National Guard members, partnering with the federal government to send disaster medical assistance teams to local health and medical systems, and “explore ways to accelerate visa applications for health professionals ”.

The state labor department also issued guidelines clarifying that workers made redundant because they refuse to be vaccinated will not be eligible for unemployment insurance, “absent a valid application for medical accommodation approved by a physician “.

All healthcare workers in New York City hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by Monday, according to state regulations and a warrant issued by the former Governor Andrew Cuomo last month. Staff in other facilities, including home care, hospices and adult care facilities, should be vaccinated before October 7.

The most recent figures suggest the state still has some way to go: As of Wednesday, 84% of all hospital workers were fully immunized. And 81% of staff at all adult care facilities and 77% of staff at nursing facilities were fully immunized as of Thursday.

State and nationwide health care systems are already struggling with staff shortages.

Critics of the requirement have challenged it through protests and lawsuits, as reported by North Country Public Radio, opposing mandatory vaccination and challenging the lack of exemptions for religious objections.

At this point, healthcare workers have the option to apply for a religious exemption at least until October 12, when a federal judge will consider a court challenge in favor of such exemptions.

As hospitals prepared their contingency plans – many of which included limiting certain procedures – at the end of last week, Hochul stuck to the deadline. She told reporters on Thursday that there was “no excuse” for workers to refuse to be vaccinated, and called the looming shortages “completely preventable.”

How health systems prepare for the deadline

Hospital systems and nursing homes statewide are encouraging their employees to get vaccinated and prepare for disruptions if they don’t. Some cut back on elective surgeries, limit admissions, and retain volunteers.

Northwell Health, the state’s largest health care provider, has held meetings with staff members in an attempt to persuade “thousands of holdouts,” the Associated Press reports. Some 90% of its 74,000 active staff had been vaccinated as of Thursday, although the hospital said it does not expect full compliance and has more than 3,000 retirees, students and volunteers in waiting.

Erie County Medical Center Corporation in Buffalo predicts that about 10% of its workforce (some 400 workers) may not be vaccinated by Monday, according to AP, and is prepared to potentially suspend elective hospital surgeries, cut back on hours in outpatient clinics and temporarily stop accepting Intensive Care Transfers.

As reported by NPR, the Lewis County General Hospital in Lowville, NY, said it would suspend maternity services starting this weekend because dozens of staff resigned rather than to get vaccinated.

Unvaccinated employees at New York City’s 11 public hospitals (which cites a compliance rate of around 88%) will be put on unpaid leave but could return to work if they get vaccinated soon, CNN reports.

Some hospital systems are seeing increased vaccination rates. New York-Presbyterian, for example, enacted its own mandate with a deadline of midnight Wednesday, and reported that only 250 of its 48,000 employees had not complied.

The University of Rochester Medical Center said in a statement that 99% of professional medical staff and 91% of all employees at its six hospitals were partially or fully vaccinated last week.

Dr Michael Apostolakos, its chief medical officer, said intensive care and many essential services will continue uninterrupted – but staff shortages unrelated to the mandate are causing some wards to hiatus.

Patients will see longer wait times for routine appointments, some employees will be asked to take on additional responsibilities, and beds may be temporarily closed, Apostolakos said in a statement.

A piece of a national conversation

New York isn’t the only place to require vaccination of healthcare workers – California announced a similar policy over the summer, and the US Department of Veterans Affairs is also requiring healthcare workers first. line get vaccinated.

President Biden announced earlier this month that the 17 million healthcare workers in facilities that receive Medicare or Medicaid funding will need to be vaccinated or regularly tested, with details to be finalized in the coming weeks.

While such demands in the workplace have the backing of many public health experts – and more than half of nurses, according to a recent survey – some politicians and hospital officials have expressed concern. And this is especially true in rural areas, where vaccination rates are low and hiring is already difficult.

Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, told NPR that the Biden administration was pursuing a tenure due to stagnant vaccination rates in hospitals across the country. She noted that while many hospitals are worried about staff shortages, employees missing from work due to illness or quarantine are also a staffing issue – and safety.

“It is very clear from the data that unvaccinated staff affects both patients entering facilities as well as their colleagues,” she said.

It remains to be seen how severe the staff shortages will be, in New York and elsewhere. Although a state has already adopted a mandate to vaccinate healthcare workers and could serve as a data point.

The governor of Maine announced a mandate for the healthcare workers in mid-August, and hospitals are reporting only a handful of resignations so far – although the application does not begin until October 29.


Alleged neglect: Woman claims nursing home killed her mother | New

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When Treca Finchum’s mother was admitted to hospital after a year and four months in Asbury Place, Maryville, she had a thick layer of dried saliva tangled in a corner of her mouth which hospital nurses cleaned up.

She was awake but not responding. Finchum said when she leaned over and shouted her mother’s name near her face, she opened her eyes for a moment. She said doctors told her they didn’t think they would be able to keep her alive, and she was returned to Asbury on hospice care.

On December 29, 2020, Carolyn Finchum passed away in her bedroom in Asbury. Around the same time, her daughter contacted lawyers in Nashville, preparing a lawsuit against Asbury, alleging medical malpractice.

Carolyn was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2019. Finchum didn’t want to put her in a nursing home, but said she had no other choice. No other family member wanted to take care of her because they had a bad relationship. Her care was left to Finchum, who also disliked her mother.

“We thought when she had Alzheimer’s disease that she had gotten mild because they usually turn (right) the opposite; no, it just got worse, ”Finchum said. “She was mean, but she was my mother.”

When she placed her mother in Asbury’s Assisted Living Program, since it was close to her home in Alcoa, she said she told employees her mother was “mean” and never turn your back on him. Asbury has transported Carolyn to a mental institution on two separate occasions, Finchum said, for attacking staff.

More than money

She said it wasn’t about the money or her mother’s memory. She believes the lawsuit has the potential to fix a problem she says she has seen since the 1980s: neglect in nursing homes.

After working at a nursing home, Finchum said she quit because she was tired of how patients were treated by staff. She said she believed her great-grandmother and grandfather were also abused.

“The money won’t bring my mom back, you know, it won’t do anything,” Finchum said. “I have already paid for a funeral, it has paid off. So, you know, it’s not the money.

The complaint was filed with the legal division of the Blount County Circuit Court on September 17 and cites her mother’s wrongful death for medical malpractice.

It included two counts of negligence: “Tennessee medical malpractice negligence” and “gross, willful, gratuitous, reckless, malicious and / or intentional negligence.”

Cathy Canning, spokesperson for Asbury, said on behalf of the company: “We deny the allegations in this complaint, but we sympathize with family members who must overcome these challenges and the grief of losing a loved one. . Asbury is a faith-based, non-profit organization that has served the elderly of East Tennessee for over 65 years, many of whom suffer from complex physical and cognitive challenges. The health and well-being of our residents has always been and remains our top priority. “

In 2016 and 2018, two court cases were filed against Asbury for medical malpractice. The Daily Times does not know the ruling in either case.

In addition, a Daily Times report from September 2018 said Asbury was fined $ 45,000 by the Tennessee Department of Health and was prohibited from taking on new residents for a limited time. . Investigators inspected Asbury’s facilities and found they violated basic administration and service standards.

Each month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services update and publish a list of nursing homes in America with quality issues.

As of August 2021, Asbury had been on the list for 27 months, the longest of any nursing home in Tennessee.

“If you can’t work with children in adult bodies,” Finchum said, “you don’t have to be in a nursing home because that’s all they are, they are children in adult bodies. “

Build a folder

The court complaint says Asbury did not “implement a system to ensure Ms Finchum was properly supervised and protected against acts of abuse and neglect”.

Asbury’s Assisted Living Program terms and conditions state that they are responsible for creating a plan to ensure the well-being of their patients. He adds that if a patient’s condition worsens to the point that their facilities are unable to maintain their well-being, they will be transported elsewhere.

Finchum visited his mother several times a week until February 2020, when Asbury stopped allowing visits due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The next time Finchum saw his mother was in December 2020, when she was rushed to UT Medical Center. She died shortly after.

In December, Finchum got a call from Asbury, informing him that his mother needed a hospice due to certain test results. Finchum was unaware that tests had been carried out and said she had requested that her mother be sent to the hospital.

Finchum said the on-site doctor Jennifer Ranson and a nurse recommended that he take a lawyer because it looked like negligence. Asbury’s test results were two weeks old, she said, adding that Ranson told her her mother should have been in hospital three weeks ago.

Court records show Finchum’s mother suffered from malnutrition, dehydration, infections, delayed care, abuse, neglect, severe pain and death due to inadequate care.

His death certificate lists complications from Alzheimer’s disease as the leading cause of death and COVID-19 infection as the underlying cause. At the end of the summer, Finchum said Asbury staff told him his mother had contracted COVID-19 but had recovered, except for a mild cough.

She said she hadn’t heard anything from them until December.

The court complaint says Finchum “seeks compensatory and punitive damages in an amount to be determined by the jury, plus costs and any other relief to which she is entitled under the law.”


To vaccinate veterans, healthcare workers must cross mountains, plains and tundra | Health, medicine and fitness


A Learjet 31 took off before dawn from Helena Regional Airport in Montana, carrying six Veterans Affairs medical providers and 250 doses of historic cargo cradled in a plug-in cooler designed to minimize breakage.

Even in a condition where speed limits of 80 mph are normal, long-distance ground transportation is risky for Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine, which must be used within 12 hours of thawing.

The group’s destination was Havre, Montana, 30 miles from the Canadian border. About 500 military veterans live in and around this small town of about 9,800 people, and millions more reside in rural and hard-to-reach areas in the United States.

About 2.7 million veterans who use the VA health system are classified as “rural” or “very rural” patients, residing in communities or on land with fewer services and less access to health care. than those in densely populated cities. According to the department, an additional 2 million veterans live in remote areas and are not receiving their VA health care. To ensure these rural vets have access to covid vaccines, the VA relies on a mix of tools, such as charter and commercial planes and partnerships with civilian health organizations.

The challenges of immunizing ex-combatants in rural areas – which the VA considers to be anything outside an urban population center – and “very rural” areas – defined as having less than 10% of the population. workforce moving to an urban center and with a population of no more than 2,500 – expand beyond geography, as more than 55% of them are 65 years or older and are at risk of severe cases of covid and only 65% ​​can be reached via the Internet.

For the Le Havre event, VA clinic workers called every patient served by the Merril Lundman VA outpatient clinic in a large area made up of small farming and ranching communities and two Native American reservations. And for those who were hesitant to get vaccinated, a nurse called them back to answer questions.

“At least 10 more veterans chose to be vaccinated after we answered their questions,” said Judy Hayman, executive director of the Montana VA Health Care System, serving the state’s 147,000 square miles.

The Le Havre mission was a test flight for similar efforts in other rural areas. Thirteen days later, another plane took off for Kalispell, MT, carrying vaccines for 400 veterans.

In Alaska, another rural state, administrators at the Anchorage Veterans’ Medical Center on Thursday finalized plans for suppliers to take an Alaska Airlines commercial flight to Kodiak Island. There, VA workers were to administer 100 to 150 doses at an immunization clinic run in partnership with the Kodiak Area Native Association.

“Our goal is to vaccinate all veterans who have not been vaccinated in and around the Kodiak community,” said Tom Steinbrunner, acting director of the Alaska VA Health System.

VA began educating rural veterans for the immunization program late last year, as the Food and Drug Administration approached emergency use authorization issuance dates for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. , according to Dr. Richard Stone, the acting officer of the Veterans Health Administration. assistant secretary. It made sense to turn to planes to deliver the vaccines. “It seemed logical to us to reach rural areas which, [like] in Montana, we had a contract with a company that had small propeller planes and short runway capability, ”said Stone, a retired Army Reserve Major General.

Veterans responded, Stone added, with more than 50% of rural veterans making appointments.

As of Wednesday, the VA had counted 220,992 confirmed cases of covid among veterans and VA employees and 10,065 known deaths, including 128 employees. As of Wednesday, VA had administered 1,344,210 doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, including 329,685 second vaccines, to veterans. According to the VA, about 25% of these ex-combatants live in rural areas, 2.81% live in very rural areas and 1.13% live on remote islands.

For rural areas, the VA has relied primarily on the Moderna vaccine, which requires cold storage between minus 25 degrees centigrade (minus 13 degrees Fahrenheit) and minus 15 degrees C (5 degrees F), but not the necessary freezer. to store the Pfizer vaccine (minus 70 degrees C or minus 94 degrees F). This, according to the VA, makes it more “transportable to rural areas”.

The VA predicts that the Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine, if it receives emergency use clearance from the FDA, will make it even easier to reach distant veterans. Moderna’s and Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccines both require two injections, spaced a few weeks apart. “One dose will allow veterans in rural areas, who often have to travel long distances, to achieve their full immunization coverage,” VA spokeswoman Gina Jackson said. The FDA’s vaccine advisory committee is set to meet on February 26 to review J & J’s clearance request.

Meanwhile, in places like Alaska, where hundreds of veterans live outside the network, VA officials have had to get creative. Flying to serve individual veterans would be too expensive, which is why Anchorage VA Medical Center has partnered with tribal healthcare organizations to ensure veterans have access to a vaccine. Under these agreements, all veterans, including non-native veterans, can be seen in tribal facilities.

“This is our main outreach in much of Alaska because the tribal health system is the only health system in these communities,” said Steinbrunner.

In some rural areas, however, the process has proved frustrating. Army veteran John Hoefen, 73, served in Vietnam and has a 100% AV disability rating for Parkinson’s disease linked to exposure to Agent Orange. He is receiving his medical care from a VA site in Canandaigua, New York, 20 miles from his home, but the facility has not specified what phase of the vaccine rollout he is in, Hoefen said.

The hospital’s website simply says that a staff member will contact veterans when they become eligible – a “don’t call us, we’ll call you,” he said. “I know a lot of veterans like me who are 100% disabled and speechless,” Hoefen said. “I went there for audiology a few weeks ago and my technician had not even received his vaccine yet.”

VA Canandaigua referred questions about the current phase of the establishment to its website: “If you are eligible for a vaccine, your VA health care team will contact you by phone, SMS, or secure message (via MyHealtheVet) to take appointment, “it says. A call to the special covid-19 phone number set up for the Canandaigua VA, which falls under the department’s Finger Lakes Health System, places the caller on the main hospital services menu, without any specific information on vaccine distribution.

For the most part, the VA uses guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine priority groups for vaccines. After immunizing most of its health workers and first responders, as well as residents of VA nursing homes, it vaccinated those 75 and older, as well as those with chronic illnesses that put them at risk for severe cases of covid. In some places, like Anchorage and throughout Montana, clinics vaccinate people 65 and over and go walk-in when extra doses are available.

According to Lori FitzGerald, chief of pharmacy at VA Hospital in Fort Harrison, MT, providers ended up with extra doses that went to inpatients or veterans seen at the facility. Only one dose was wasted in Montana, she said.

To determine vaccine eligibility, facilities use databases and algorithms from the Veterans Health Administration Support Service Center to aid in the decision-making process. The facilities then notify veterans by mail, email, or phone or through VA portals of their eligibility and when they can expect to be vaccinated, depending on the department.

Air Force veteran Theresa Petersen, 83, was delighted that she and her husband, an 89-year-old U.S. Navy veteran, were able to get their shots at the Kalispell event. She said they had been informed by their primary care provider of the opportunity and jumped at the opportunity.

“I would do anything to give the Veterans Affairs medical system as much credit as possible,” said Petersen. “I’m so in love with the concept, ‘Yes there are people who live in rural America and they have health issues too. “”

The VA is authorized to provide vaccines only to veterans currently enrolled in VA health care. About 9 million US veterans are not registered with the VA, including 2 million rural veterans.

After veterans were turned away from a VA clinic in West Palm Beach, Florida in January, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) Wrote to acting VA secretary Dat Tran urging her to include these veterans in their covid vaccination program.

Stone said the agency was not licensed to provide services to these veterans. “We have had discussions with Capitol Hill on how to reconcile this,” he said. “Some of them are very old veterans and we don’t want to turn anyone away. “

This story was originally published by Kaiser Health News.


Death toll rises to 15 among nursing home residents evacuated to Tangipahoa warehouse

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BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (BRPROUD) – Fifteen of the nearly 850 nursing home residents evacuated to a warehouse in the parish of Tangipahoa before Hurricane Ida died, according to the Louisiana Department of Health (LDH).

LDH said a coroner had confirmed five deaths were linked to the storm.

“Additional deaths can be considered storm-related pending autopsy / pathology results, but to highlight these deaths have yet to be classified as storm-related,” Mindy Faciane said, LDH public information office.

Faciane said in an email that the death toll is likely to increase.

“Over time and given the health conditions that required a level of nursing home care, unfortunately the number of deaths among this group is likely to increase,” Faciane said. “This is why it is important to distinguish between the total number of deaths from any cause and the number of storm-related deaths.”

The seven nursing homes that were evacuated to the warehouse belong to Bob Dean. Dean’s portrayal John McLindon said the five people who died during or around the evacuation were all in hospice care.

LDH stripped nursing homes of their licenses. McLindon said they are appealing for the reinstatement of the licenses.

Dean faces seven lawsuits and one survey bYes the attorney general according to McLindon.

McLindon said they are “cooperating as much as possible”.


New York braces for possible staff shortages as healthcare COVID vaccination mandate approaches


Governor Kathy Hochul said on Saturday she was ready to bring in medically trained National Guard members, retirees and workers outside New York to deal with potential staff shortages caused by the ‘approach of a COVID-19[female[feminine vaccination mandate for health workers.

If necessary, Hochul said, she will declare a state of emergency through an executive order to address staffing shortages in hospitals and nursing homes once the warrant goes into effect on Monday.

Many healthcare workers still haven’t received the required first injection of the COVID-19 vaccine days before the deadline, leaving the possibility that thousands of healthcare workers will be forced out of work next week.

The order would allow medical professionals licensed in other states or countries, recent graduates or former medical professionals to practice in New York City, Hochul said, noting that she was exploring ways to speed up visa applications for health professionals.

The governor said she also has the option of deploying members of the National Guard and partnering with the federal government to deploy disaster medical assistance teams.

“I am closely monitoring the staff situation and we have a plan to increase our health care workforce and help ease the burden on our hospitals and other health facilities,” she said in a prepared statement.

State hospitals prepared contingency plans that included reducing elective surgeries. Many retirement homes restricted admissions.

“We are currently about 84% vaccinated statewide, so any initiatives the governor might come up with to increase staffing are welcome and necessary,” said Stephen Hanse, who represents nursing homes across the country. ‘State as president of the New York State Health Facilities Association. and the New York State Center for Assisted Living.

Hochul, a Democrat, has resisted calls to delay the mandate, and her 11-hour announcement could increase pressure on vaccine laggers. She said workers fired for refusing to be vaccinated are not eligible for unemployment insurance without a medical accommodation application approved by a doctor.


Nursing Home Workers Face Monday’s Immunization Deadline | New

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OLEAN – At last count, 62% of employees at Pines Nursing Home in Cattaraugus County had been vaccinated against COVID-19 as mandated by the New York State Department of Health on Monday at midnight.

This could represent as many as 100 employees spread across both Olean and Machias Pines, including an unknown number of certified nurses and orderlies.

“Cattaraugus County continues to encourage employees at its Pines nursing home to get vaccinated against COVID-19,” county administrator Jack Searles said on Friday. “There are immunization clinics today and again on Monday to try to encourage people to get the vaccine.”

Searles said: “We have until the end of Monday to get as many people vaccinated as possible.”

County nursing homes have suspended all new admissions until the impact of the vaccination mandate on nursing home staff is clear.

The Cattaraugus County Legislature has allowed County Attorney Ashley Milliman to take legal action to try to block the warrant.

A federal judge in Utica issued a temporary restraining order on September 15 to prevent the state from enforcing the vaccination mandate for healthcare workers on the grounds that it violated their constitutional rights because it did not there was no religious exemption. Arguments in the case will be heard on Tuesday.

Searles said there appears to be a disconnect with the reporting of vaccinated nursing home workers on the state’s website.

“Some employees come to our clinics or show up with vaccination certificates,” Searles said. “We probably won’t know the number of nursing home workers who are vaccinated until after midnight Monday.”

Searles said he does not have the current number or percentage of county nursing home workers who are vaccinated. Nursing home workers are expected to have their first injection no later than Monday. Health service workers must have their first injection before October 7.

“The number changes every day,” he said. “I believe we are much better than the state website shows. Monday we will be much better. There has been constant improvement. We are progressing.

Deputy Administrator Kelly Reed, who oversees county nursing homes as the nursing home administrator, was unavailable for comment.

“We still believe there should have been at least one religious option to the vaccination mandate,” Searles said.

This could be decided as early as Tuesday in the Federal Court of Utica.

Searles said the county was disappointed the state had not allowed the vaccine requirement to be withdrawn for frequent testing. “We’ve been doing it for a year and a half. It succeeded. It is not fair to ignore the concept of testing altogether.

This is what is creating the current crisis in other nursing homes and hospitals across the state, Searles said. “Other places, including the school, have an option to opt out of testing. The only standard we are held to is the vaccination rate. We did not have due process here. It is a mandate that is imposed on us and that is unconstitutional. We will continue to pursue our legal action with New York State on this matter. “

Searles added, “In the meantime, we will do everything in our power to encourage people to get vaccinated. I expect a number of people will not (get vaccinated).

The state Department of Health’s vaccine guidelines for nursing home employees allow for a medical exemption that must be signed by a physician or medical assistant.

Searles said that, under the directive, if a nursing home employee chooses not to be vaccinated against COVID-19, “they will not be allowed to work in the facility.”

Searles said the nursing home administration “supports shift changes.” Nursing homes operate 24/7 with three shifts. The county has hired at least three companies that hire healthcare workers, including registered nurses, for nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.

“Things are changing quickly,” Searles said. “We’re making a lot of progress, but we’re not done yet. We have not been able to recruit additional staff to work at our facilities. Health is a profession in demand. We are in open competition with all other medical providers in the region and region. “

Searles said the county’s first effort was to use its own staff in nursing homes. “If I have a low-staffed shift, I still have to provide quality service. “

County officials are working with union members on impact negotiations, Searles said. “The intention is to preserve individuals as county employees for as long as we can.”


Nurses discuss impact of New York State’s immunization mandate on healthcare system


Healthcare workers fear this will cause an even greater shortage of workers, which will ultimately have a ripple effect as Monday’s deadline approaches.

BUFFALO, NY – Healthcare workers in nursing homes and hospitals statewide must be vaccinated by Monday or may be unemployed.

As Monday approaches, even nurses who were already vaccinated are starting to worry.

“Vaccinated health workers will always try to help those who need help in these hospitals or nursing homes and they may not have the staff to support them,” said Candace Bliss.

Bliss received the vaccine as soon as it was available and is a nurse in Wyoming County. She has seen nursing students quit their programs before because they don’t want to be vaccinated.

“It’s really sad because it’s going to affect the future of healthcare,” Bliss said. “It is a scary time whether you are vaccinated or not.”

A Utica judge has temporarily blocked the warrant until Oct. 12 for healthcare workers who file for religious exemption, such as Catholic healthcare nurse Jillian Dobrzenski.

After October 12, she will be put on unpaid leave for 30 days and then fired. That is unless the judge sides with the health care workers who filed the complaint.

With many workers leaving on Monday, Dobrzenski doesn’t expect things to get any better for the state’s healthcare system.

“You take us away, this personnel problem is exacerbated. The patient is suffering, the community is suffering, and my vaccinated colleagues who still have work are suffering because they no longer have to work without our help,” said Dobrzenski.

Catholic health officials are not disclosing how many of their employees have requested a religious exemption.

Officials say the hospital system supports Gov. Kathy Hochul’s decision to go ahead with the mandate. This is because they say through science and data the vaccine has been proven to end the pandemic.

Catholic Health did not say how many workers have applied for a religious exemption, but 83% of workers are vaccinated there.

Meanwhile, Gov. Hochul said if the number of healthcare workers were not vaccinated enough by Monday, she would announce initiatives to help facilities cope with the shortages.

Local nurses aren’t sure the warrant is the answer.

“I think people should be vaccinated, but on the other hand, it’s such a difficult balance right now. I don’t know what the correct answer is. I don’t know if that’s that mandate,” Bliss said.


COVID outbreak in Washington nursing home kills 5, infects dozens

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A nursing home is trying to tackle a COVID-19 outbreak that began in August, when the first new case was confirmed.

The Pinewood Terrace Nursing Center in Colville, Washington has seen 22 employees and 52 residents test positive for the coronavirus and five deaths. The first case was reported on August 25, according to the Northeastern Three Counties Health District.

Of the 74 people infected in total, 33 were fully vaccinated and of the five residents who died, one was fully vaccinated.

“This speaks to the seriousness and danger that the delta variant poses to all individuals,” a county spokesperson said in a statement. “It also shows the vaccine’s ability to protect against serious illness in those who have been vaccinated. “

More than half, 64.5%, of nursing home residents are vaccinated, but only 37.1% of staff are also vaccinated as of September 5, according to Medicare.gov.

News from the retirement home:The official tally of coronavirus toll in nursing homes likely missed 16,000 deaths; 68,000 cases

Following:Could COVID-19 Precautions Break the Stigma and Spread of Lice? School nurses see the promise

Tri-County Health, which covers Ferry, Pend Oreille and Stevens County, currently has 5,965 positive cases of COVID-19. Pinewood Terrace is located in Stevens County, which has the highest number of positive cases out of the three counties and has had 35 COVID-related deaths since September 1, the health district said.

“We are seeing firsthand that your age, gender, medical condition and demographics do not protect you from the severity of this virus,” they said in a statement.

About 2,500 miles away, another nursing home is fighting the same fight.

The Honolulu Care Center in Nuuanu, Hawaii, currently has 54 infected patients and two dozen employees, forcing nurses to care for the center’s 182 licensed beds, the Featured Advertiser Reports.

The Care Center of Honolulu told the Star Advertiser that 91% of its staff and, on average, more than 80% of its patients are vaccinated against COVID-19 and that six people have been hospitalized, two of whom have been released from isolation .

At the start of the pandemic, nursing homes were ravaged by COVID-19. A retirement home in Washington was the first major epidemic in the country. Now, a recent study shows that there were 592,629 cases and 118,335 deaths in nursing homes at the end of 2020 alone.

Follow Keira Wingate on Twitter: @KeiraRenee



The Community Health Care Program is also studying the social determinants of health to help improve the well-being of residents: Rutgers-Camden Campus News


Instructor Rebecca Bryan with students Christina Neal and Anastasia Dudzinski at the Salvation Army Kroc Center vaccination center

By Jeanne Léong

Rutgers University ‒ Camden students provide COVID-19 vaccines and health services to Camden residents while studying the social determinants of health to find solutions to help improve health care for city dwellers.

According to the United States Census Bureau, 1 in 10 people live in poverty and many people cannot afford basic necessities such as healthy food, health care, and shelter.

For many residents of Camden, social inequalities, systemic racism and poverty affect their health and their access to health care.

“When nursing students understand the root causes of social determinants of health and the impact of these determinants such as lack of access to care, unstable housing, food insecurity, unsafe neighborhoods and the lack of reliable transport, they can take better care of the health of patients. care and wellness priorities, ”says Donna Nickitas, Dean of the Rutgers School of Nursing ‒ Camden.

Thanks to a grant from the New Jersey COVID-19 Service Corps (NJCSC), Rutgers ‒ Camden is participating in a project with Montclair State University to bring together emerging public health and allied health professions to provide support to communities as part of the national AmeriCorps program.

Donna Nickitas, Dean of the Rutgers School of Nursing – Camden

Donna Nickitas, Dean of the Rutgers School of Nursing – Camden

Based at the Rutgers Health Center ‒ Camden in Centerville branches, eight students from the Rutgers School of Nursing ‒ Camden will provide vaccine training, administer vaccines and study how social issues such as poverty, unemployment and lack of childcare affects residents’ ability to lead healthy lives and access health services.

“I hope we can begin to address the glaring inequalities that have contributed to the pandemic’s disproportionate impact on this community,” said Rebecca Bryan, director of community engagement and professional development, student supervisor and instructor. program clinic. .

During the seven-month program from September to April, students will receive credit for 300 clinical hours, receive a stipend of $ 2,665 for living expenses, and receive a scholarship of $ 1,343 that can be used for cover the cost of future training or to pay off federal student loans.

During the 2020-21 academic year, participants from Rutgers ‒ Camden AmeriCorps provided community health care in the town of Camden by providing clinical monitoring, education, and vaccinations to residents of the Salvation Army Vaccination Center. Kroc Center, pop-up clinics, schools, and the City of Camden Housing Authority.


Polish protesters warn looming health crisis


WARSAW, Poland – When a priest arrives at a hospital in Chorzow to perform the last rites, nurse Mariusz Strug can see fear in the eyes of dying patients. “After the sacrament, they knew what was going on,” he said.

But there were no psychologists available to offer any solace to the patients. Strug and another nurse would try to offer kind words, but they were stretched to the limit to treat 60 patients in their COVID-19 ward.

“People come to us and they want us nurses to perform a miracle,” Strug said.

After a year and a half of the pandemic, and as Poland stands on the cusp of a fourth wave of COVID-19 infections, nurses, doctors, ambulance drivers and other health workers are came to urge Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and other authorities to make far-reaching reforms of the health system, arguing that it risks collapsing.

“The pandemic has shown us how bad the health system is,” said Gilbert Kolbe, nurse and spokesperson for the protest movement. “This is the last chance to do something before it’s too late. We will not be able to avoid a crisis in five, ten years.

While healthcare workers in the European Union in 27 countries have been tested by the pandemic, Poland has faced this test with fewer doctors and nurses than most. According to OECD statistics, Poland has the lowest number of practicing doctors in relation to its population: only 2.4 to 1,000 inhabitants compared to 4.5 in Germany. Poland also has only 5 nurses per 1,000 inhabitants, which is lower than the EU average of 8 and well below richer countries like Germany, which has 14.

The Polish healthcare sector has been strapped for resources for decades, a situation that has not been rectified by a series of governments on the left, center or now right.

The problems were exacerbated by the thousands of doctors, nurses and others who left Poland for better paid work in Western Europe after the country joined the EU in 2004.

Among the healthcare professionals who remained in Poland, many also left the public sector for higher-paying jobs in the private sector, leaving less to care for the poorest people, said Kolbe, a 25-year-old. who left a public hospital. work for a private medical company but hopes to return to the public system one day.

Kolbe said that an average of 5,500 people complete their nursing education each year in Poland, but only around 2,500 go to work in the public system.

Some of those who protest say they are simply exhausted. With low wages, some work more than one medical job to support themselves.

Alicja Krakowiecka, a 56-year-old nurse from the southern city of Czestochowa, said her hospital was so understaffed that at the height of the pandemic she sometimes started her day at 6 a.m. only to be invited to stay because that the night nurse was ill. She was then left alone with 30 patients for a 24 hour shift. Instead of taking two days off, he would be asked to come back the next evening.

” You refuse ? She asked, explaining that she was okay with the exhausting changes out of a sense of obligation.

The protest began on September 11, when tens of thousands of people from all over Poland marched through Warsaw. Some stayed in tents and held daily press conferences and lectures.

Protesters were deeply moved last weekend when a 94-year-old man who came to give them candy killed himself a few feet away. A gunshot rang out at a press conference and medics ran towards the man, but could not help him.

Since then, they have protested silently, waiving press conferences.

Amid the pressure of protests and talks between health unions and the government that last for weeks, Morawiecki announced on Tuesday that an additional billion zlotys ($ 254 million) would be allocated this year for wages and salaries. education in the health sector.

In addition, Health Minister Adam Niedzielski said on Wednesday that he had agreed to pay paramedics more.

Still, the group that organized the protests said the rest of the healthcare community was not happy, meaning more talks between the government and the protesters are on the way.

Kamila Maslowska, a medical student, stopped in protest tents with friends on Tuesday to show her solidarity.

“I am fluent in two more languages ​​besides Polish so I think I could find a job abroad,” she said, “(But) I wouldn’t like to leave. thing is changing for the better.

———


AARP Monthly Report Shows Wisconsin COVID Nursing Home Death Takes Five-Fold

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MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) – Thursday’s recall developments come as there is new data regarding people living in nursing homes. The AARP monthly COVID database shows Wisconsin nursing home deaths increased five times since the previous month’s report.

Wisconsin now averages about 11 nursing home deaths each day. And the AARP dashboard showed cases among staff members were on the rise, and the percentage of Wisconsin facilities with a staff shortage is almost double the national rate.

Jim Flaherty, associate state director of communications for AARP, said: “If you’re not on top of making sure these residents have what they need and that they have vaccines, things can. get very ugly, very quickly. “

The latest information from the AARP shows five deaths in nursing homes per 10,000 residents. Last month there was only one death. Now there is growing concern as AARP officials have reiterated how quickly a COVID outbreak can impact a collective care setting.

Flaherty said, “Someone can come off the street to visit a loved one and bang, it blows up in a nursing home. Any kind of community setting, not just a nursing home.”

Flaherty says he hopes everyone is careful because the vulnerable nursing home population can often be overlooked. So far, 22% of all COVID-related deaths have occurred in nursing homes. But he says some positive news is that 62.4% of health workers are vaccinated and 86.5% of residents are fully vaccinated.

However, another concern is the industry-wide staffing shortage: more than 44% of Wisconsin establishments are understaffed, nearly double the national rate. Mike Pochowski, president and CEO of the Wisconsin Assisted Living Association, said, “The caregiver crisis, or the workforce crisis, is possibly the worst it has ever been. We have great difficulty recruiting and retaining staff to work at our facilities statewide. “

And when staff shortages impact care, nursing homes and assisted living facilities across the state are affected. Rick Abrams, President and CEO of WHCA / WiCAL, said, “We have facilities in the state that are closing to admissions. individual.”

Abrams says hospital patients are starting to back down as they cannot be accepted into nursing homes where they would normally be referred. He says at least 53 patients in the La Crosse area have nowhere to go right now.

But there is some optimism as facilities improve to cope with and contain outbreaks. Flaherty said: “All we can do is take the necessary precautions to make people as safe as possible. Because we don’t know what the next variant will be.”

Abrams called the labor crisis in the industry a full-fledged pandemic, but said facilities are improving a lot to isolate outbreaks when they do occur.


15 deaths among nursing home patients moved to warehouse

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Death toll dropped from seven to 15 among nursing home residents evacuated before Hurricane Ida to a warehouse where conditions were deemed too squalid for safety, the state’s health department said Thursday.

However, a department statement noted that some fatalities may be unrelated to the storm or conditions in the warehouse.

“Over time and given the health conditions that required a level of nursing home care, unfortunately the number of deaths among this group is likely to increase,” he said. “This is why it is important to distinguish between the total number of deaths from any cause and the number of storm-related deaths.”

The number coroners have classified as linked to the storm remains at five, Department of Health spokesman Kevin Litten said in an email. He said coroners were investigating others.

John McLindon, attorney for Bob Dean, who owns seven nursing homes evacuated to the warehouse, said he was confident Dean would be cleared.

“There is no evidence that the evacuation caused or contributed to any of these deaths,” he said.

The health department said 843 people were brought to the warehouse in Independence City, and more than 50 of them had to be hospitalized afterwards.

Authorities said the warehouse reeked of urine and feces, with some people lying in dirty clothes, without food, on mattresses on the floor. Garbage was piled on the ground, there was water in the building and the generators broke at least temporarily, state officials said.

McLindon said he would appeal the ministry’s dismissal Dean’s Nursing Home Licenses and Medicaid Provider Agreements by the Oct. 6 deadline.

The first five deaths were all in people in palliative care, he said. “When you are in hospice care, you are at the end of your life,” McLindon said.

The Times-Picayune / The New Orleans Advocate first reported the to augment in deaths.

The state attorney general has opened a criminal investigation and state health officials are investigating the deaths.

Dean told media that, given their age and frailty, two or three people in his home die each day under normal circumstances.

Dean faces at least five lawsuits from nursing home residents and their families, the newspaper reported.


COVID-19 cases at LA County skilled nursing facilities decline, public health reports

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Reflecting the general trend in Los Angeles County, the number of COVID-19 cases among staff and residents of skilled nursing facilities increased from early July to mid-August and began to decline in recent weeks. .

“The drop in cases in skilled nursing facilities is good news and reflects the high vaccination coverage in these facilities as well as the strict infection control measures,” said Dr Barbara Ferrer, director of the public health department of the LA County. “We continue to prioritize and support skilled nursing facilities with third doses for immunocompromised residents and we stand ready to scale up these efforts once recalls are approved. The decline in cases and deaths in nursing homes is an important reminder of the power of vaccines to prevent serious illness and death from COVID-19. “

During the week ending August 8, 123 cases were reported among residents and staff of skilled nursing facilities. For the week ending September 12, 55 people tested positive for COVID-19 at skilled nursing facilities: 20 new cases were among residents of skilled nursing facilities and 35 new cases among skilled staff at facilities nursing. In the past three weeks, an average of 65 new cases have been reported among staff and residents of skilled nursing facilities.

Currently, 88% of residents and 90% of staff in skilled nursing facilities are fully immunized. Qualified nursing facilities are subject to strict infection control precautions and are also required to check the immunization status of all workers and perform routine tests on staff and residents. By September 30, healthcare workers, including staff in skilled nursing facilities, must be fully immunized against COVID-19.

Public health confirmed 41 new deaths and 1,750 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, and identified 1,448,065 positive COVID-19 cases in all areas of LA County and a total of 25,911 deaths.

There are 1,018 people with COVID-19 currently hospitalized and 31% of those people are in intensive care.

At the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Santa Clarita, the number of inpatients increased by 31% after several weeks of declining trend.

“We went from 22 inpatients to 29 in less than a week,” Moody said. “We continue to strongly encourage everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated. “

Vaccination is the best way to stay out of the hospital, according to the CDC, said Henry Mayo officials.

As of Wednesday, September 22, 34,035 cumulative cases have been reported in the Santa Clarita Valley since March 2020, according to public health. These cases include:

  • 26,021 in the city of Santa Clarita * (+55)
  • 62 in the unincorporated areas of Bouquet Canyon
  • 1,110 in Canyon Country unincorporated areas
  • 4 338 in Castaic * (+8)
  • 70 in the unincorporated areas of Newhall
  • 4 in the Placerita canyon
  • 18 in San Francisquito / Canyon du bouquet
  • 22 in Unincorporated Sand Canyon
  • 161 in unincorporated areas of Saugus (+1)
  • 47 in the unincorporated areas of Saugus / Canyon Country
  • 1,615 at Stevenson Ranch (+6)
  • 414 in unincorporated areas of Val Verde
  • 264 in unincorporated areas of Valencia

* As of Monday, September 20, public health officials have recorded 2,182 cumulative cases at the Peter J. Pitchess Detention Center, including 1,577 at the North County Correctional Facility. These cases are split between the city of Santa Clarita and Castaic totals.

Public Health encourages all eligible people to be vaccinated. Anyone 12 years and older living or working in LA County can get the COVID-19 vaccine. Many vaccination sites across the county, including all county-run sites, also offer third doses of the vaccine to eligible immunocompromised people. Vaccinations are always free and open to eligible residents and workers, regardless of their immigration status.

To find out how to make a vaccination appointment, what checks you will need to present during your vaccination appointment and much more, visit the LA County Immunization Website (English) or Vacunate Los Angeles site (Spanish).

Vaccinations are always free and open to eligible residents and workers, regardless of their immigration status.

See all coronavirus coverage: Coronavirus Coverage – COVID-19 Map

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Sask. Heart and brain specialists prepare as healthcare slowdown worsens amid COVID-19 outbreak


The long list of types of medical care currently on hold across Saskatchewan includes home care, diabetes rehabilitation and counseling, but also major brain and heart procedures.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority has provided a general list of surgeries and other care delayed or canceled as COVID-19 patients, mostly unvaccinated, fill hospitals and intensive care units across the province.

It comes as COVID-19 cases continue to rise, with 426 new cases in the province announced on Wednesday, 54 more than those reported the day before. The number of hospitals also set a new record for the fourth day in a row on Wednesday.

Specialists interviewed this week, including a neurologist and a cardiologist, provided details of the changes for their patients. These include all “coiling” operations to prevent high risk patients from suffering from a brain aneurysm. In another example, all cardiologists were ordered Wednesday to cancel half of all cardiac stress tests, angiograms and diagnostic procedures.

“We are frustrated, tired, scared,” said Regina cardiologist Dr. Andrea Lavoie.

Lavoie and Saskatoon stroke neurologist Dr. Brett Graham said anyone in an emergency will always receive the same care as usual. They say anyone with urgent concerns or changes in their condition shouldn’t hesitate to call 911.

Indefinite wait

But the non-urgent needs of hundreds if not thousands of others across the province will have to wait indefinitely. Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death in Saskatchewan. Much of delayed care is designed to prevent or identify major problems, but that is not possible at this time.

“We feel for our patients. They can feel abandoned,” Graham said.

Graham said the COVID-19 outbreak has also affected where patients are staying. The most critical still have beds in hospitals in Saskatoon and Regina, but others are now being told to stay in Yorkton or North Battleford or other smaller centers. Still others, normally admitted to hospital, are under the supervision of home care staff.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority also said Wednesday that adult patients with COVID are occupying beds at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital.

Lavoie and Graham said healthcare staff are working tirelessly to provide the best possible care for all patients.

But Lavoie said there was also frustration and sadness, because none of this was supposed to happen.

For weeks, medical professionals, academics, scientists, statistical modeling experts, city leaders and many more have pointed to evidence of a fourth wave driven by the more virulent delta variant of the coronavirus. The Saskatchewan Medical Association, the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses and the government’s own medical officers of health have asked for indoor mask warrants and passports for vaccines.

Anti-mask and anti-vaccine locals have rallied on several occasions to assert what they saw as their individual rights and freedoms. Premier Scott Moe and Health Minister Paul Merriman urged residents to act safely, but rejected calls for more government rules.

Dr Brett Graham, a stroke neurologist in Saskatoon, says anyone with a health emergency will still receive care, but dozens of their patients’ elective procedures and surgeries will be delayed or canceled due to the COVID-19. (Jason Warick / CBC)

At the end of last week, as the number of hospitals and intensive care units hit record highs and Alberta announced a slew of new restrictions, Moe issued the public health orders requested by experts.

Lavoie, Graham and others predict that things could get worse over the next few weeks until the new measures take effect.

“It was really demoralizing for healthcare workers knowing that we are about to see what we are, and that there was a way to avoid it,” Lavoie said.

No one from the Saskatchewan Health Authority was available for an interview.

But according to a list provided by the authority, here are some of the canceled or delayed health care needs:

  • Primary care – diabetes education, health counselors, chronic disease management.
  • Home care – education, therapy, foot care, wound care, nursing support.
  • Population and public health – dental health programs, health promotion, sexual health clinics.
  • Rehabilitation services.
  • Cardioscience and Neuroscience – outpatient clinics, including heart function and stroke prevention clinics, stress testing, lung function lab.
  • Outpatient services for mother and child – Women’s health center, outpatient pediatric consultations.
  • Geriatric services, including respite care.
  • Dermatology services.
  • Outpatient care – eye center, minor surgeries, cystoscopy, endoscopy.

An official with the Saskatchewan Health Authority said in the email that this list could be expanded or changed as needed. The official said all cancer cases, both emerging and urgent, will be given the typical high priority.


CMS Takes Another ‘Hit’ From COVID Vaccination Transparency In Nursing Facilities

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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) announcement a new tool on the CMS comparison website to enable consumers to access the vaccination rates of staff and residents of each nursing facility and make informed decisions when choosing a nursing facility. CMS has asked certified healthcare facilities to report weekly COVID-19 vaccination data since May and can use that data to feed into the new transparency tool. As a result, the new transparency tool does not add new requirements to nursing facilities, although mandates to vaccinate nursing facility staff may be forthcoming under new emergency federal regulations.

Although vaccination rates are currently available on the CMS COVID-19 data from nursing homes website, the information is isolated from the COVID-19 data and is not user-friendly. Inclusion of vaccination rates on the Compare website will allow consumers to view vaccination data, as well as other data points, including information on fire safety, penalties, staffing levels, and more. , offering a more complete picture of the care establishment.

CMS’s reporting of immunization data to the CMS Compare website is another administration response to low immunization rates among nursing home workers. These efforts were previously discussed with new rules require nursing facilities to educate and offer COVID-19 vaccine to residents, clients and staff, and report weekly COVID-19 immunization data for residents and staff, and will soon be covered in more detail with a new condition of participation fully vaccinate workers. The collection and presentation of large national data sets, in a user-friendly format, is an ongoing federal effort to encourage quality-based competition in the healthcare industry.

This is also a measure taken by CMS to increase transparency of vaccination rates, as requested by US Senate.


COVID outbreak at skilled Oahu nursing home amid worker shortage adds stress to facility

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HONOLULU (KHON2) – The Hawaii Nurses Association has sounded the alarm about low staffing levels in skilled nursing homes. The union president said members were overworked as at least one facility battled a COVID outbreak.

At least 54 residents and 25 staff at the Care Center of Honolulu have tested positive for COVID-19.

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“We don’t have the details of the origins of this particular outbreak, but it is a significant outbreak,” said Healthcare Association of Hawaii president and CEO Hilton Raethel. “And certainly one of the biggest outbreaks we’ve seen at any of our facilities in some time.”

A spokesperson working with the Care Center of Honolulu confirmed that the source of the coronavirus infection was traced to a patient who had been transferred to the facility.

The Care Center of Honolulu shared a statement with KHON2 News.

Like a number of nursing homes in the state, the Delta variant resulted in an outbreak of COVID in September at our facility. While 91% of our staff are vaccinated, 54 patients have tested positive, the majority of which have been vaccinated. On average, more than 80% of our patients are vaccinated.

After learning of the existence of our first infected resident, we immediately tested residents and staff at the facility and took steps to isolate infected residents and put protocols in place to protect staff and residents. We test residents and staff more often than necessary, and we are grateful to have been commended by the state Department of Health for our handling of this outbreak.

Every member of the staff at the Care Center of Honolulu has made an extraordinary effort to provide the highest standards of care to our patients. We have nothing but praise for our nurses, who, like their counterparts around the world, are meeting the challenges posed by the pandemic in heroic fashion.

We regret that our high regard for our nurses has been called into question by false statements made by the Nursing Association of Hawaii. No nurses have been suspended and we continue to work collaboratively with our nurses to manage patient care and schedules.

We agree with the Hawaii Nursing Association that there is a shortage of nurses in long-term care facilities that has become even more acute during the pandemic. We also enlisted the help of the Healthcare Association of Hawaii. Our elected officials in Washington and others in the state health department are trying to find solutions to this problem facing all long-term care facilities and the health care system in general.

Honolulu Health Center

Hawaii Nurses Association president Daniel Ross said members were working longer hours to fill in worker gaps. He said that in one case a nurse was working an 8-hour shift.

Ross said, “We advised them, listen, it’s not patient abandonment if you tell them you’re not safe, that you’re not fit to work. It comes to a point, you cannot work continuously while being able to do your job safely. “

Raethel said a proposal to bring in more than 240 additional healthcare workers at a cost of $ 10 million had not received state approval. He presented the $ 10 million proposal to strengthen post-acute care facilities to members of the Hawaii House of Representatives in early September.

In the meantime, he said the institution’s attempts to bring in more staff through recruiting agencies have also been unsuccessful.

Find more COVID-19 news: cases, vaccinations on our Coronavirus News page

“The facility went to a number of agencies to try to identify staff,” Raethel said. “And there were staff who were available, but didn’t want to go into a facility that is experiencing an epidemic, which also presents an additional set of challenges.”


Judge extends ban on enforcement of state vaccine mandate in healthcare


A northern judge extended the temporary ban on the state’s