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Vaccine mandates struck amid historic shortage of health workers


The rise initially coincided with an increase in hospitalizations for Covid-19, but shortages have persisted even as the virus recedes, suggesting other factors.

“We don’t have a single position we can afford to lose right now,” Eric Dickson, president of UMass Memorial Health, told Bloomberg Radio last month. “I have neighborhoods that have a vacancy rate of 50%. And God forbid, we lose more.

In recent weeks, labor shortages have resulted in extreme measures, even in areas that are not Covid hotspots. In Virginia, five state mental hospitals have had to stop accepting patients. A shortage of nurses forced the Rhode Island hospital to shut down part of its emergency department. And a major Michigan hospital chain says 5% of its beds cannot be filled due to understaffing.

At TaraVista, a modern building with airy hallways and large windows, demand for psychiatric and drug beds is skyrocketing amid the increased emotional stress and substance use of the pandemic. “Parents call me crying, ‘Please take my child,’” said Sheila Crowley, director of admissions. It hurts to refuse them, she said.

All at once

Historically, severe health workforce shortages have occurred in dispersed areas and hard-to-hire sectors like nursing homes, said Karen Donelan, professor of health policy at the ‘Brandeis University. But “at this point we hear about it in most states,” she said, and even in large, wealthy institutions that have not traditionally struggled.

Factors include retirements and quits motivated by burnout; absences due to illness and quarantine; immigration limits in recent years; and the attractiveness of lucrative “travel” contracts from competing employers across the country. Now add vaccine resistance to the mix.

“All of these challenges at the same time,” Donelan said.

Salaries for nurses have remained relatively stable for many years after adjusting for inflation, she said, and salaries for less skilled jobs have also stagnated. The country has nearly 4 million nurses and the supply has grown steadily over the past decade, she said. Demand, driven by an aging population, has also increased and is expected to accelerate over the next decade.

In some markets, increases and bonuses in response to the pandemic may represent a long-term correction, Donelan said, although it is not yet clear.

Overall, employment in the health care sector remains below pre-pandemic levels. The gaps are greatest in nursing homes and care facilities: Nursing facilities employed about 14% fewer people in August than in January 2020, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. In residential mental health facilities, the decrease is 8%.

Doctors’ offices employ roughly the same number of workers as before the pandemic, while employment in laboratories and dental offices has increased.

Empty beds

In the hardest-hit settings, hospital and health agency leaders are experiencing the worst staff shortages in four decades. At a Massachusetts law hearing last month, officials said at least one in five jobs caring for people with disabilities and in nursing homes was unfilled.

Other work sectors, such as tourism and catering, are also experiencing labor shortages, but “the consequences are different,” said Michael Weekes, president of an association of service providers in the city. anybody.

“While it can be disappointing for someone to wait for a lobster roll or an ice cream cone, or to wait longer for their hotel room, when essential staff are absent from social services, security and the health of clients and residents is immediately there. risk, ”he said.

In behavioral health – which includes psychiatric care and addictions – at least 400 beds statewide remain empty, while several hundred patients are forced to inappropriately ‘board’ for days in wards. emergency or medical services.

300 more psychiatric beds are expected to come online this year, but “the big question is where will the staff come from? said David Matteodo of the Massachusetts Association of Behavioral Health Systems.

More than half of the state’s care facilities have had to stop accepting new residents intermittently, according to Massachusetts Senior Care Association president Tara Gregorio. She called on foreign workers to fill the void.

State officials are allocating $ 31 million to strengthen the behavioral health workforce, along with tens of millions more to deal with the larger crisis.

Desperate measures

So far, aside from government financial assistance, employers have been largely left to their own desperate means to retain and hire staff.

At TaraVista in central Massachusetts, CEO Krupa estimates the hospital is investing an additional $ 1 million per year in salaries, improved benefits, bonuses and other sweeteners for 310 employees there and in a hospital. partner. Overtime has doubled from around 3% of pay to 6%.

When asked if he had ever seen such big loyalty bonuses and increases, he replied, “dramatically, emphatically no, no, no”. Krupa is determined to have enough staff to fill all the beds by the end of the year, he said – even if that means recruiting and housing workers from out of state or even d ‘other countries. He sees the longer term solution in higher payments by insurers and great potential in forgiveness of student loans.

The hospital’s vaccination mandate will begin on November 1, he said, and “I hope we don’t lose a lot of staff. But I know we’re going to lose some.

© 2021 Bloomberg LP



Illinois Court Says Nursing Home Lawsuit Wrongly Sent to Arbitration

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By Jonathan Capriel (October 1, 2021, 7:00 p.m. EDT) – An Illinois state appeals court has revived a lawsuit alleging that a long-term living facility, one of its nurses, and her Chicago-based parent company are responsible for a former hip fracture of a resident, ruling that there remains a question whether the patient was competent enough to sign an arbitration agreement.

A three-judge panel on Thursday overturned a Cook County court decision to refer arbitration claims filed by Antwine Kizart, who alleges years of abuse at Heather Health Care Center Inc. , which is operated by Alden Management Services. He says he needed hip surgery after a fall in 2018 in …

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As Philly vaccination deadline approaches, thousands of home health workers have yet to receive doses


Thousands of home helpers in Philadelphia remain unvaccinated, making it unlikely that many in the industry will get vaccinated in time to meet the city’s Oct. 15 vaccination mandate for workers in the city. health.

“The numbers are pretty low and pretty striking,” said Teri Henning, executive director of the Pennsylvania Home Care Association. “There is a lot of work to be done in a very short period of time.

The mandate requires, with few exceptions, that anyone working in health care in the city be vaccinated before the deadline. Immunization figures are so low that the industry is seeking an extension of the Philadelphia Department of Public Health. It’s a possibility, spokesman James Garrow said, but wondered if more time would make a difference.

“Given that the deadline was announced on August 13, giving people more than two months to get vaccinated,” he said, “it could be questionable that an extension at this point will cause people to to act”.

Home health care may include skilled nursing, palliative care caregivers, and home health aides who do not have specific medical training, and it is the latter group that is of particular concern, Henning said. There is no precise vaccination count among them, but she said conversations with vendors and business owners indicated that about half of the city’s roughly 50,000 assistants had not been vaccinated. The people they serve are some of the city’s most vulnerable, and many are at risk of the worst effects of COVID-19 due to age, illness or disability.

READ MORE: Faced with COVID and civil unrest, Philly home health workers still show up for risky work

The Philadelphia Department of Public Health has recognized the large number of home care workers who are not vaccinated. Some nursing homes had also done no better than fully immunizing about half of their employees, Garrow said, although the median vaccination rate among the city’s nursing homes was 74%.

A handful of major Philadelphia nursing homes did not respond to calls for information on their immunization rates.

In Pennsylvania, which does not have a vaccination mandate for healthcare workers, about 65% of nursing home workers are vaccinated, roughly the same national vaccination rate for these workers. A federal immunization mandate for all Medicare and Medicaid-certified health facilities is expected to be finalized in October.

The city’s mandate has so far garnered mixed compliance. Several large hospital systems – some of which have imposed warrants in front of the city – have already reported more than 90% of their workers vaccinated.

Unless unvaccinated workers decide to take the Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine by Friday, they will not meet the city’s October 15 deadline. Even if a worker were given an injection of the two-dose vaccine options, Moderna or Pfizer, on Friday, that person would not receive their second dose before the deadline.

“We are more concerned about the low immunization rates in nursing homes due to the high rates of hospitalizations and deaths that occurred at these facilities earlier in the pandemic,” Garrow said.

The city is not hosting any clinics for the next two weeks specifically aimed at healthcare providers, but Garrow noted that there are 350 vaccination sites throughout the city, and many of them allow people to be vaccinated. without an appointment.

The warrant allows for exemptions based on documented health or religious issues, and exempt workers could wear masks and undergo frequent testing instead.

Home care agencies fear their staff will be emptied.

“I honestly believe I would lose 50% of my workforce,” said Michael Spivak, general manager of All American Home Care, which includes a Philadelphia site employing approximately 1,000 people.

Spivak applauded the mandate when the city announced it in August. He was happy that this removed the burden on business owners to require vaccination, and believed it would quickly increase vaccination rates. It didn’t work that way, he said.

“I really thought it would start with the city, then other cities would pick it up, then the state would pick it up, and then they wouldn’t have a choice,” Spivak said.

Providers have made efforts to get the doses accepted by unvaccinated workers. Lolita Owens, a home health aide at Liberty Resources Home Choices and a representative for SEIU, the union that represents some health workers, had one-on-one conversations with colleagues to encourage vaccination. She herself hesitated when the vaccine was first available, she said. Two people she cares about convinced her that the shot was safe and necessary.

“When you walk in and out of people’s homes, when you go to work with your coworkers,” she said, “you should be vaccinated, not just for yourself, but for them as well. “

READ MORE: Healthcare and higher education workers, students to get vaccinated by mid-October, Philadelphia announces

Owens hears colleagues say they don’t want to be vaccinated for religious reasons, but few have expressed fear of the vaccine. Many just don’t want to be told what to do.

“I heard someone say, ‘Why are they trying to tell me what to do with my body?’ “she said.” I think they realize [having COVID-19] maybe it can be that bad, but then you’ve got people who might be like, “well, i’m gonna take this chance”. Or even you got some that say ‘I won’t be the only one to have [sick] because I do this, that and the third to take care of myself. “

Liberty has held a raffle to encourage vaccination, Owens said, and expects to have two more before the deadline. Spivak is partnering with a vaccine supplier to host a clinic in his office, he said.

Home care providers, Henning said, have spoken with the city’s health department about the extension.

The mandate as it stands, she said, “would leave a huge number of caregivers unable to work.”

Anyone wishing to be vaccinated in the city can visit phila.gov/vaccine or vaccines.gov.

Editors Jonathan Lai, Justine McDaniel and Erin McCarthy contributed to this report.


Houma nursing home trial claims evacuation resulted in death of resident

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Three children of a resident of the Houma retirement home who died after being evacuated to a warehouse in Tangipahoa parish during Hurricane Ida filed a complaint against the establishment and its owner.

Thomas Becnel Jr., Darren Becnel and James Becnel filed the complaint Friday at the parish of Terrebonne on behalf of their late father, Thomas Becnel Sr., who resided at Maison DeVille in Houma, according to court records.

Thomas Becnel Sr. died on August 30, a day after the Category 4 hurricane made landfall and left a trail of destruction in Terrebonne and Lafourche, according to the prosecution.

This is the latest in several lawsuits against seven nursing homes and their owner, Bob Dean Jr. of Baton Rouge. At least seven evacuation-related deaths have been reported. Lawsuits brought by the families of those who died allege that the evacuees endured inhumane conditions, including being forced to sleep on concrete floors as water began to seep into the building.

The lawsuits allege that more than 800 nursing home residents and staff survived the hurricane as conditions began to deteriorate.

Following:Hundreds of nursing home residents will remain evacuated until Houma hospitals come back online

“During the botched evacuation, Thomas Becnel Sr. was neglected and his medical needs were not met, which ultimately resulted in his untimely death,” says the latest trial. “The immediate, contributory and legal cause of injury and death of Thomas Becnel Sr. includes the negligent, serious and criminal action and / or inaction of Bob Dean Jr., as owner and operator of Maison DeVille Nursing. Home. The plaintiffs and their deceased relatives were not at fault.

Thibodaux’s attorney, Matt Ory of AMO Trial Lawyers, who represents the plaintiffs, said Dean was personally responsible for the unfortunate evacuation and the way it was carried out by staff at his seven nursing homes .

“Unfortunately for Mr. Becnel and the other residents, Dean appears to have put safety first and acted with complete disregard for the health and well-being of Becnel and the other residents,” Ory said. “Dean ignored an evacuation plan that had previously been submitted by his nursing homes to the (Louisiana Department of Health), and in the end, his conduct resulted in the deaths of many residents. We believe that Mr. Dean’s conduct was so abhorrent as to amount to the level of criminal negligence, and Mr. Becnel’s death was homicide by criminal negligence.

The lawsuit accuses Dean of not having:

  • Evacuate Maison DeVille in complete safety.
  • Follow the evacuation plan previously approved by the Ministry of Health.
  • Adequately supervise the evacuation.
  • Contact the family of Thomas Becnel Sr.
  • Have adequate caregivers and supplies at the warehouse
  • Use safe work practices and provide appropriate supervision for those working in the warehouse.

The plaintiffs are asking for a jury trial.

Baton Rouge attorney John McLindon, who represents Dean, said the Louisiana Department of Health approved the evacuation plan before the storm made landfall.

“The LDH had employees at the facility on August 27 and 28, two days and one day before the hurricane made landfall,” McLindon said in a telephone interview Thursday. “The LDH checked and said in their report that there were lots of supplies, water and everything looked fine. And then, unfortunately, the storm moved east and passed through Independence, Louisiana, where the facility was located. This caused some issues, but I don’t think they are as bad as described.

Following:‘I’m still crying’: family members heartbroken by nursing home evacuation

McLindon said tough decisions were made quickly to protect the evacuees from the dangerous storm.

“There were three buildings where people were staying,” he said. “Once they realized the storm was right on them, the administrators made the decision to get everyone into the safest building. You are damned if you do and damned if you don’t. They were forced to make decisions in a very tense and rapidly changing situation. ”

The plan Dean submitted to the state is not the one he implemented, Ory said.

Also:Lawyer for Nursing Home Owner Says Reports of Horrible Conditions “Greatly Exaggerated”

“State regulators have done their job on this matter,” Ory said. “The system has not failed; on the contrary, Mr. Dean blatantly flouted the rules, including ignoring a plan he had previously drafted and submitted, and his criminal negligence led to this tragedy. In order to prevent something like this from happening again, the community must see Mr. Dean paying for his actions. Hopefully, the deterrent effect of financial ruin will discourage anyone tasked with caring for our elderly citizens from trying to cut corners on a future evacuation. Profit should never compromise care.

– Editor-in-Chief Dan Copp can be reached at 448-7639 or dan.copp@houmatoday.com. Follow him on Twitter @DanVCopp.


PHYSICIANS AND WHAT THEY DO Access to convenient health care


With the push of a button, people can request a ride, shop, or have dinner delivered to their doorstep. It’s safe to say that we live in an increasingly on-demand world and the healthcare industry is no exception. Patients expect more from providers than good care. They also want ease, convenience and choice. Heartland Regional Medical Group medical experts, in partnership with Marion Republican, present: Doctors and What They Do. This month, we’re taking a closer look at the ways southern Illinois consumers can easily access health care and medical information.

Express care or urgent care

Many Americans today report that they have not been able to see a primary care physician for a variety of reasons, including simply not yet joining one. At the same time, interest in affordable, on-demand emergency or express care clinics has grown rapidly. As a result, emergency care centers play an increasingly vital role in the continuum of care.

A local example is Heartland Regional’s Express Care clinic. Open 7 days a week, 8:30 a.m. to 9 p.m., specialists treat non-emergency illnesses and injuries that require primary or acute medical care. The clinic also offers a wide range of routine medical services, such as health examinations and medical examinations. No appointment necessary.

Located across from Krispy Kreme, on The Hill, in Marion. More information about Express Care is available online at www.HeartlandMedicalGroup.com.

Online appointment booking

Online appointment booking has become an increasingly important and expected part of people’s lives. Most Americans have experience planning online with trips and restaurants among the most commonly reported online planning experiences. Consumers expect the same service when it comes to making an appointment with their doctor.

By offering online scheduling, Heartland Regional patients can schedule appointments, both for primary care physicians and other medical specialists, even when the offices of the Marion-based provider are closed. Patients simply go to www.HeartlandAnytime.com, select a provider, and choose a time slot that fits their schedule. In addition to in-person visits, consumers can schedule a telehealth visit and speak to a provider from the comfort of their own homes via video chat.

24/7 nurse support lines

Health problems can arise at the most inconvenient times. Whether it’s 10 p.m. on a school night or 2 a.m. on a Saturday, consumers need answers now, not just when your doctor’s office is open. A proven service, the Nursing Advice Line, is an important way to get practical, evidence-based information and support when questions about symptoms or care arise. Locally, Heartland Regional’s toll-free nursing helpline is available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

“During the pandemic, patients across the country have struggled to decide whether to seek care,” said Crista Minnick, Heartland regional chief nurse. “This reluctance continues to cause ongoing complications for the many people who choose to delay care. Now, with our nurse helpline, those who have questions, about illness or injury, have a new 24/7 resource for answers. “

If you have medical questions and concerns, you can call the Heartland Regional 24/7 Nursing Hotline at (618) 226-5454 or visit www.MyNurseHelpLine.com.


Keep up to date: learn more about immunization warrants, nursing home closures, booster shots

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Just three days after New York State’s vaccination mandate went into effect for healthcare workers, Monroe County and health officials met on Thursday to brief residents on how systems have been affected.

Vaccination rate of hospital staff

In a statement released Thursday, the University of Rochester Medical Center said 96% of hospital employees were vaccinated, 3% had approved medical or religious exemptions and 1% of employees had resigned.

“We are delighted that such a high percentage of UR Medicine employees have chosen vaccination, which protects them individually against serious illnesses from COVID, while collectively protecting our patients, families and communities,” said Steven Goldstein, senior vice-president of URMC.

People with approved exemptions are required to undergo weekly COVID testing as well as daily symptom monitoring.

“We continue to encourage all eligible to be vaccinated, including staff members who currently enjoy a religious exemption or who have recently resigned and will be welcomed back,” Goldstein said.

At Rochester Regional Health, more than 99% of staff have been vaccinated, according to its chief medical officer, Dr Robert Mayo. Mayo said less than 1% of unvaccinated employees have about five days of administrative leave to reconsider getting vaccinated.

“Their employment would end if they didn’t follow the rules,” Mayo said.

At Monroe Community Hospital, the delay is a little more lenient. County manager Adam Bello is granting 30 days of unpaid administrative leave under which unvaccinated employees must be vaccinated to keep their jobs. Bello said 93.8% of MCH employees have been vaccinated, there has been one resignation and seven exemptions have been approved.

The impact of the retirement home

Health care officials have said that despite high employee vaccination rates, hospital systems are still understaffed in some areas, especially in nursing homes and rehabilitation centers.

According to URMC officials, 24 nursing homes in the Finger Lakes area have stopped accepting new patients. Officials said this was the result of previous staff shortages that had been compounded by the state’s mandate to vaccinate healthcare workers.

URMC chief medical officer Dr Michael Apostolakos said people waiting to enter nursing homes are causing overcrowding in hospitals.

“This results in a significant percentage of our beds being occupied,” said Apostolakos, “making it more difficult for patients to get through the emergency room and our hospital.”

UR Medicine hospitals have 55 patients awaiting discharge to a nursing home, and RRH has at least 60. “We continue to treat them, we continue to look for options,” said Dr. Robert Mayo, physician. head of RRH.

COVID-19 back-to-school protocol

The increase in COVID-19 cases among school-aged children is also causing local health systems to be stretched, officials said.

In an effort to reduce pressure on clinical facilities, the Monroe County Public Health Department is making it easier for sick students to return to school once they get better.

Public Health Commissioner Dr Michael Mendoza said students who were ill will not have to see their health care provider for clearance under certain conditions.

“As long as their symptoms are gone and they’ve tested negative with the correct test, they can go back to school after going back to school with algorithms,” Mendoza said.

He said the correct test is either the Nucleic Acid Amplification Test (NAAT) or the PCR test.

Rapid tests, Mendoza said, are not acceptable, according to state mandates. He said these tests have proven to be unreliable in areas with high or moderate transmission rates.

Recall shots

Monroe County will begin giving booster shots to residents 65 and older starting Friday, according to County Director Adam Bello. He said the third dose is by appointment and is only available at the County Fleet Center clinic and the downtown campus clinic at Monroe Community College.

Bello said more locations will become available as eligibility increases.

Appointments for a reminder can be made here or by calling 211.


California warrants increase vaccination rates among healthcare workers


“It has become a real challenge for some hospitals to have enough staff,” Ms. Emerson-Shea said, adding that her organization had asked the California Attorney General to investigate reports of price increases by agencies charging hospitals hundreds of dollars an hour. .

This week, state public health officials offered healthcare facilities a 45-day compliance grace period to address critical staff shortages caused by the warrant.

But California has generally taken a strong stance on pandemic health measures. At the onset of the crisis, the state was among the first to issue stay-at-home orders, and it was among the most aggressive in promoting masks and vaccinations.

Mr Newsom – who overcame a pandemic-fueled effort to remove him from office earlier this month – said this week the state was “in talks” with school districts over a demanding mandate that eligible students get vaccinated. This week, state health officials also extended the mandate of health workers to thousands of home health workers and health workers in centers for the elderly, centers for the disabled and hospices, giving them a deadline of November 30.

“This is a critically important mandate that helps keep everyone safe in our health care system, and it especially protects those who are critically ill and who depend on hospitals and other facilities for their health. protect their health, “Dr Tomás J. Aragón, the state’s director of public health, said in a statement, adding that health authorities are closely monitoring deadlines and” expect full compliance. “

Compliance appears to be the goal of the state’s largest healthcare employers. In Kaiser Permanente’s massive system, for example, more than nine in ten of California’s 216,000 employees and 23,000 physicians are fully vaccinated, a spokesperson for the system said. Two weeks ago, the vaccination rate for system workers was around 87%.

At Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, about 97% of an estimated 17,000 employees are now vaccinated. Dr Jeffrey A. Smith, director of operations, said while most of the hospital’s staff and doctors were early adopters, up to 800 staff were vaccinated after the state’s tenure limited their options for working in other California hospitals.


INSIDE MY TOWER: Why would healthcare providers lie?



The press recently ran an opinion piece written by a man who implied health care providers are liars and quoted the story of intensive care nurse Emily Farness of a nurse writing farewell letters to a dying patient as proof that the hospital is not really in crisis.

I speak firsthand, as I have helped our intensive care team meet patient care needs through the team nursing model, both in December / January and again in August / September, the need currently continuing. Many of my peers and I worked overtime outside of our home department, week after week, to meet patient needs. I worked with a basic critical care RN who was on her 10th consecutive 12 hour shift and who was still sitting on the edge of the bed, holding a patient’s hand and treating that patient with dignity and compassion as he ended up with comfort-of-life care plans for the patient’s spouse as care was withdrawn.

I have also worked for years alongside the registered nurse mentioned in the story and know that nurse lost her remaining parent this year. His personal loss made him more in tune with the importance for his patient to say goodbye to him. This team of nurses put a lot of effort into taking the time to help a patient say goodbye to loved ones. Do you know why? Because we (the healthcare providers) are desperately trying to keep our empathy and our humanity alive during this overwhelming battle that seems to never end. We work tirelessly to give our patients the best of ourselves in sub-optimal conditions.

Some of our COVID-19 patients have been with us for weeks. Some get better, some die, some become widowed or widowed while in our care, and some are permanently disabled and will never return to the life they once knew. Working in intensive care right now is heartbreaking. Health care providers experience trauma and grief, lose sleep, and worry about their own loved ones. Then we quit work and many in our community insult us and neglect our eyewitness testimony.

I ask you why would health care providers lie? Distorting the situation would be of no use to us. There is no benefit in health care organizations reversing what really makes money – elective surgeries – in favor of housing critically ill patients for weeks at a time. Healthcare organizations everywhere are bleeding money to pay for larger tanks of oxygen, more equipment, increased pay for travel nurses or overtime for core staff and large amounts of costs. ‘individual protection equipment.

Health care providers have no reason to lie to you about what we see. We are human beings doing our best in a horrible situation. Please do not attack or insult us for doing our best to show compassion to our suffering and dying patients.

• • •

Shannon Kline, MSN, RN, is a nurse at Kootenai Health.


New York lawmakers want $ 4 billion nursing home victims compensation fund – The Madison Leader Gazette

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State lawmakers want to set up a massive $ 4 billion nursing home victim compensation fund to provide tax relief to thousands of families whose loved ones have died after contracting COVID-19 in nursing homes.

The legislation – sponsored by State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-The Bronx) and Assembly Member Ron Kim (D-Queens) – will allow families to submit claims to a victims’ compensation board. nursing homes and receive state payments.

The bill takes inspiration from the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund to help victims of terrorist attacks, including those who suffer health problems after inhaling the toxic stew from the World Trade Center towers that s ‘collapse.

Families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each loved one who dies from the virus, and spouses and dependents will each be able to receive a minimum payment of $ 100,000, Kim said.

“The Nursing Home Victims Justice Act will make it very costly for our state and the nursing home industry to commit seniors. At the height of the pandemic, it is quite clear that the only motivating factor of our state government was to protect the profits of the industry on the lives of people, ”Kim said.

“We need to make the cost prohibitive to others of harming the elderly. To do otherwise would be to normalize “reprieve” and to allow the complete abandonment and neglect of the elderly for the benefit of “productive members” of society.

Separately, the bill would extend the statute of limitations for civil claims and causes of action for bodily injury or death of nursing home residents linked to COVID-19, according to the memo.

A box with the cremated ashes of Dnynia Armstrong, a COVID-19 nursing home victim, is surrounded by baskets of pine cones depicting other nursing home victims, is on display in New York City on March 21, 2021.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig, File

“This bill sets out regulations to prevent future constraints on nursing home liability, ensuring that injustices of this nature will never happen again on such a scale in this state,” it read.

It’s unclear where the funding will come from in the state budget, but Kim said he plans to meet with Assembly leaders next month to discuss the bill.

More than 15,000 residents have died from COVID-19 in nursing homes since March 2020, but families have been unable to sue because a provision – drafted by the powerful hospital lobbying arm of state – backed by nursing home groups – has been slipped into the state budget granting health care facilities and workers’ liability immunity from negligence lawsuits.

Theresa Sari’s mother, Maria Sachse, was a nursing home resident who died of COVID-19.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig

Former Governor Andrew Cuomo later repealed the “Emergency or Disaster Treatment Protection Act” in April 2021 following outcry from lawmakers, lawyers and families.

But New York nursing home policy has been mired in controversy since the onset of the pandemic – an infamous order issued on March 25, 2020 banned nursing homes from denying admission or readmission of patients with coronavirus in hospitals and also banned them from testing residents for the deadly virus.

Although the order was revoked in May 2020, independent reports confirmed that its effect had resulted in “several hundred and possibly more than 1,000 deaths.”

State Senator Alessandra Biaggi, D-Bronx
State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-Bronx) is a co-sponsor of the legislation.
AP Photo / Hans Pennink

Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo – who resigned in disgrace last month following a damning report on sexual harassment released by investigators hired by State Attorney General Letitia James – has refused to release the number total deaths in long-term care facilities for months, excluding the number of residents who were transferred from their homes because they were so sick and later died in hospitals.

A lawsuit filed by the conservative Empire Center for Public Policy forced the state to release accurate data, and James’s office later released a report in January confirming the death toll was likely 50% higher than what was reported by the state health ministry.

Next, The Post exclusively reported that key Cuomo associates admitted to withholding data from the federal government because they “froze” and feared retaliation.

Deputy Ron Kim
Assembly member Ron Kim said families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each family member who died of COVID-19.
James Messerschmidt for NY Post

The shocking admission sparked an investigation into the case by the FBI and federal prosecutors in Brooklyn – which is apparently ongoing – as well as a key principle of an impeachment inquiry by the Assembly Judiciary Committee of the United States. State.

The body is expected to release a report in the coming weeks, according to Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-The Bronx).

Representatives of Governor Kathy Hochul, Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins ​​(Westchester) and Heastie could not be reached for immediate comment on the fund bill. compensation.


New York lawmakers want $ 4 billion nursing home victims compensation fund

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State lawmakers want to set up a massive $ 4 billion nursing home victim compensation fund to provide tax relief to thousands of families whose loved ones have died after contracting COVID-19 in nursing homes.

The legislation – sponsored by State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-The Bronx) and Assembly Member Ron Kim (D-Queens) – will allow families to submit claims to a victims’ compensation board. nursing homes and receive state payments.

The bill takes inspiration from the 9/11 Victims Compensation Fund to help victims of terrorist attacks, including those who suffer health problems after inhaling the toxic stew from the World Trade Center towers that s ‘collapse.

Families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each loved one who dies from the virus, and spouses and dependents will each be able to receive a minimum payment of $ 100,000, Kim said.

“The Nursing Home Victims Justice Act will make it very costly for our state and the nursing home industry to commit seniors. At the height of the pandemic, it is quite clear that the only motivating factor of our state government was to protect the profits of the industry on the lives of people, ”Kim said.

“We need to make the cost prohibitive to others of harming the elderly. To do otherwise would be to normalize “reprieve” and to allow the complete abandonment and neglect of the elderly for the benefit of “productive members” of society.

Separately, the bill would extend the statute of limitations for civil claims and causes of action for bodily injury or death of nursing home residents linked to COVID-19, according to the memo.

A box with the cremated ashes of Dnynia Armstrong, a COVID-19 nursing home victim, is surrounded by baskets of pine cones depicting other nursing home victims, is on display in New York City on March 21, 2021.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig, File

“This bill sets out regulations to prevent future constraints on nursing home liability, ensuring that injustices of this nature will never happen again on such a scale in this state,” it read.

It’s unclear where the funding will come from in the state budget, but Kim said he plans to meet with Assembly leaders next month to discuss the bill.

More than 15,000 residents have died from COVID-19 in nursing homes since March 2020, but families have been unable to sue because a provision – drafted by the powerful hospital lobbying arm of state – backed by nursing home groups – has been slipped into the state budget granting health care facilities and workers’ liability immunity from negligence lawsuits.

Theresa Sari, left, and her daughter Leila Ali look at a section of a memorial wall
Theresa Sari’s mother, Maria Sachse, was a nursing home resident who died of COVID-19.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig

Former Governor Andrew Cuomo later repealed the “Emergency or Disaster Treatment Protection Act” in April 2021 following outcry from lawmakers, lawyers and families.

But New York nursing home policy has been mired in controversy since the onset of the pandemic – an infamous order issued on March 25, 2020 banned nursing homes from denying admission or readmission of patients with coronavirus in hospitals and also banned them from testing residents for the deadly virus.

Although the order was revoked in May 2020, independent reports confirmed that its effect had resulted in “several hundred and possibly more than 1,000 deaths.”

State Senator Alessandra Biaggi, D-Bronx
State Senator Alessandra Biaggi (D-Bronx) is a co-sponsor of the legislation.
AP Photo / Hans Pennink

Former Gov. Andrew Cuomo – who resigned in disgrace last month following a damning report on sexual harassment released by investigators hired by State Attorney General Letitia James – has refused to release the number total deaths in long-term care facilities for months, excluding the number of residents who were transferred from their homes because they were so sick and later died in hospitals.

A lawsuit filed by the conservative Empire Center for Public Policy forced the state to release accurate data, and James’s office later released a report in January confirming the death toll was likely 50% higher than what was reported by the state health ministry.

Next, The Post exclusively reported that key Cuomo associates admitted to withholding data from the federal government because they “froze” and feared retaliation.

Deputy Ron Kim
Assembly member Ron Kim said families will be entitled to a minimum payment of $ 250,000 for each family member who died of COVID-19.
James Messerschmidt for NY Post

The shocking admission sparked an investigation into the case by the FBI and federal prosecutors in Brooklyn – which is apparently ongoing – as well as a key principle of an impeachment inquiry by the Assembly Judiciary Committee of the United States. State.

The body is expected to release a report in the coming weeks, according to Assembly Speaker Carl Heastie (D-The Bronx).

Representatives of Governor Kathy Hochul, Senate Majority Leader Andrea Stewart-Cousins ​​(Westchester) and Heastie could not be reached for immediate comment on the fund bill. compensation.


Alaskan healthcare workers welcome COVID boosters amid nation’s worst wave


Alaska Native Medical Center nurse Rocky Carloni rolls up his sleeve before receiving a COVID-19 booster shot on Monday. (Nat Herz / Alaska Public Media)

Alaskan healthcare providers, facing an intense wave of COVID-19 that has engulfed state hospitals, say they are relieved and grateful for a decision by Dr Rochelle Walensky, director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which allows them to receive vaccine boosters.

Some experts have questioned Walensky’s decision last week that healthy people in high-risk jobs, in addition to the elderly and at-risk groups, can get the recalls if they choose.

Critics said Walensky’s decision, which struck down a divided CDC vaccine advisory committee, gave Americans too much leeway to research third vaccines before residents of poorer countries could get their first and last. created confusion over who qualifies.

But in interviews, many Alaskan healthcare providers said Walensky’s decision was in line with the demands and risks they took amid the country’s most intense outbreak of coronavirus cases and d hospitalizations. Some remote clinics also had doses close to their expiration date.

The Aleutian Islands community of Unalaska. (Berett Wilber / KUCB)

“It’s like your parents telling you to finish your dinner because there are starving children in Africa,” said Dr. Megan Sarnecki, medical director of the Aleutian Island clinic in Unalaska. . “You don’t send your leftovers to starving children in Africa. And we don’t send a vial of which we have only used half to a third world country.

A nationwide debate has been going on over the boosters for more than a month, since President Joe Biden announced that every adult would be entitled to one eight months after their original two-dose vaccine.

Subsequently, federal expert groups tasked with evaluating vaccines recommended them only for certain groups, with members expressing concerns about unnecessary injections and the lack of data showing clear benefits of allowing boosters for one group. most important.

While the Food and Drug Administration panel agreed to offer the injections to people in high-risk jobs, such as healthcare workers and teachers, the CDC’s expert panel was not to. agreed in a 9-6 vote last week. Members said they feared the move would distract the nation from distributing vaccines to the unvaccinated, which has a much higher public health benefit, and they also questioned whether the recommendations were too vague and did not enter into the public confidence.

“We might as well say give it to anyone 18 and over,” the Washington Post said, citing CDC panel expert, pediatrician Paul Sanchez. “We have a really good vaccine, and it’s like saying it doesn’t work, and it works.”

Walensky, the director of the CDC, announced her decision to step down from the panel on Friday, a day after her vote.

The agency’s final statement said people 65 and older, residents of nursing homes and people 50 and older with risky conditions “should” receive booster doses, while Younger people with underlying medical conditions and people in risky workplaces “could” receive the third injection.

The recommendations apply only to the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine; the expert groups have yet to consider the issue of broad-based boosters for vaccines made by pharmaceutical companies Moderna and Johnson & Johnson.

While Walensky’s decision has drawn criticism from some academics and health care administrators, there has been little reaction in Alaska where the current outbreak is putting the state’s hospital system under intense pressure.

Administrators, already overworked on staff, said they did not want to risk losing more employees in groundbreaking COVID-19 cases. In Unalaska, when front desk staff at the clinic contracted the virus, the general manager spent a week answering phone calls, Sarnecki said.

Then there were the personal risks.

Dr. Thomas Kelley works in the intensive care unit at Alaska Native Medical Center. (Nat Herz / Alaska Public Media)

A recent shift in the intensive care unit at Alaska Native Medical Center was the “most difficult, grueling, depressing and saddest time I have ever experienced,” said the Dr Thomas Kelley in an interview this week outside a clinic where dozens of hospital workers had received their third injection.

“We just watched people die, no matter what we did,” Kelley said. “My reaction to the recommendations to have the booster was, ‘I just want the booster.’ I am terrified of what I see, I remain terrified of what I see, and I don’t scare easily.

There is data suggesting that boosters are safe, effective and may minimize the risk of COVID-19 either for people with health conditions or who face repeated exposure, said Dr Anne Zink, chief medical officer of Alaska. She said the CDC’s “permissive language” addresses concerns about legal protections and liability regarding booster doses and “allows individuals, in association with their health care provider, if necessary, to make that risk decision. -benefit “.

“I just think it really recognized the variety of scenarios and clinical situations that we see, the variety and diversity of the human experience and what we see with COVID as a whole,” Zink said in an interview. . “There are very few healthcare workers that I work with on a regular basis who did not eagerly await this information from the CDC, simply because they are seeing so much COVID right now and really want to do everything in their power. power to keep themselves, their families and their communities safe and healthy.

Zink said the Alaska Department of Health has debated whether to release its own recommendations breaking with the CDC’s panel of experts, although this is no longer necessary after Walensky’s decision, a- she added.

Many Alaskan hospitals and health systems had already started moving forward with booster doses for staff members before the CDC’s announcement.

In the central western Alaskan town of Nome, the tribal health organization, Norton Sound Health Corp, began handing out boosters to staff two weeks ago, after an earlier CDC recommendation that immunocompromised people should receive it.

“We are an incredibly rural and austere medical environment. It takes us a long time to get people in and out of here, ”said Tim Lemaire, a doctor with NSHC. “It will be interesting to see what the evidence shows in the long run. But for us, we thought it was the right call to at least offer it to everyone. “


Cattaraugus County Places 13 Unvaccinated Nursing Home Workers on Ineligibility Leave | New

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OLEAN – Thirteen employees at Pines Nursing Homes in Cattaraugus County refused to be vaccinated against COVID-19 before Monday’s deadline and were placed on ineligibility leave without pay for 60 days.

Eight employees are listed as unvaccinated at Machias Pines and five at Pines Nursing Home in Olean. There are 176 employees in Machias and 162 in Olean. Each retirement home has around 110 beds.

Twenty-seven other nursing home workers – 25 from Machias Pines and two from Olean – have applied for religious exemptions. Two others at Olean have requested medical exemptions.

A federal judge in Utica issued a restraining order last week and set an October 12 hearing on the issue of religious exemption for nursing homes and other healthcare workers that were not addressed in the state directive.

There are also eight health service workers currently classified as unvaccinated plus five who requested religious exemptions and one who requested medical exemption.

Health department workers face an Oct. 7 deadline to get their first dose of the vaccine under the state health department’s mandate.

County administrator Jack Searles said on Tuesday the county was offering the vaccine to all employees on all shifts until midnight Monday. Several employees took advantage of the last minute vaccination opportunity.

The county and its unions negotiated a memorandum of understanding on September 15 regarding the mandate to vaccinate healthcare workers. The parties agreed to a 60-day ineligibility leave without pay and to maintain health and dental insurance in effect. Employees could use vacation or other time off during the period. They will also continue to accumulate seniority.

Nursing home workers – unvaccinated and vaccinated – will continue to participate in testing twice a week.

Searles said county officials “strongly encouraged” employees to get vaccinated.

Nursing homes suspended new admissions earlier this month to see how the employee’s vaccination mandate would impact operations.

“We started off with a much higher number,” Searles said. The number has been reduced to 13, with 29 other employees seeking religious or medical exemptions.

“We’re always going to be understaffed at our facilities,” Searles said. Some employees, including licensed direct patient care staff, quit rather than get vaccinated.

The county hired three healthcare recruiting companies to help provide additional staff to Olean and Machias.

The MOU also provides for an increase of $ 5 per hour for eligible employees who continue to work, including overtime.

Searles said some employees who are not eligible to work in nursing homes could find employment in other county departments under a deal with the unions.

In addition, 65 county employees from other departments have volunteered to work shifts in nursing homes under overtime rules, Searles said.

According to Judge David Hurd’s rulings at the next hearing on the state’s lack of religious exemption in the state directive, the county may not be out of the woods just yet.

The county, he said, continues to compete with nursing homes, adult care facilities and assisted living facilities as well as other health facilities in the region for nurses and other employees.

Searles said county officials will have a conference call today with Gov. Kathy Hochul to discuss how the state can help counties and private nursing home operators across the state in the face of challenges. staff shortages during the vaccine tenure.

“Maybe we’ll learn more tomorrow,” Searles said.


US healthcare workers and nurses call for safe staff ratios


Following the reopening of schools in the United States in August and September, the latest wave of COVID-19 saw a wave of protests and strikes by healthcare workers against the horrific consequences of the pandemic’s handling of the epidemic. ruling class. Workers are ordered to return to work and all safety concerns have been put aside to secure profits. According to official figures – which are undoubtedly a vast underestimate – nearly 700,000 people have died from the disease in the United States alone. The normalization of deaths, seen by healthcare workers at unprecedented levels, has sparked massive discontent among these workers.

EMT Giselle Dorgalli, second from right, watches a monitor while performing chest compression on a patient who tested positive for coronavirus in the emergency room at Providence Holy Cross Medical Center in the Mission Hills section of Los Angeles. (AP Photo / Jae C. Hong, file)

No serious mitigation measures have been taken, let alone any effort to eliminate the pandemic. Hospitals and emergency rooms, which were already largely understaffed before the pandemic, have filled up to the point of being forced to turn away patients. Many no longer have beds and patients are forced to sleep in the hallways. Hospital staff are forced to use triage – to decide who gets care and who doesn’t, who lives and who might die – based on the limited resources they have. These morbid choices are among the main grievances raised by healthcare workers. The requirement for safe staffing ratios is essentially the requirement that the health system fulfill its official mission: to take care of the sick.

The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) chairs the staff of Sutter Delta Medical Center in Antioch, California, where healthcare workers voted to start a strike in October for safe staffing ratios. Sutter Delta spokesperson Marissa Currie responded to the strike announcement condescendingly, saying management and the union will continue to try to come to an agreement “to avoid a costly strike and stay focused on our commitment. common ground in patient care at a time when our communities need us most.

Jennifer Stone, an emergency technician at Sutter, said Beckers Hospital Examination, “We wear too many hats, we describe angry COVID patients, then we rush to a code, then we talk to family members who have just lost a loved one. We cannot provide adequate care. We are neglected and left to fend for ourselves, and we can no longer do everything.

This wasn’t the first eruption of anger among California healthcare workers over staffing ratios. In July, 1,400 nurses at USC Keck and USC Norris Cancer Hospital in Los Angeles held a two-day strike against dangerous staffing ratios.

SEIU has a long history of strangling the struggles of healthcare workers. In June alone, the SEIU called off three separate strikes by Connecticut nursing home workers. All of these strikes were motivated by the demand for secure staffing ratios.

The call for staff safety was also made at Mercy Hospital in Southern buffalo, new York, where workers were forced to work during lunch hours and breaks to make up for understaffing. On top of that, medical supplies are running out, a problem commonly reported by healthcare workers throughout the pandemic. New York has 2,410,000 recorded COVID-19 cases, with some 55,000 deaths and a 7-day average of 2,224 hospitalizations. Last year, at least 2,334 adults who died from COVID-19 were reportedly placed in a mass grave on Hart Island, and many bodies of deceased victims were stored in refrigerated trucks for long periods of time.

Oregon is now asking refrigerated trucks to store the multitude of bodies that have piled up due to “herd immunity” policies, which have allowed infections and deaths to spread freely. Hospitals in Oregon average 1,000 hospitalizations per day, with only 8% of beds available. A survey at Kaiser Permanente Hospital in the state showed that 42% of its resident nurses are considering leaving the profession due to the high burnout rate due to the pandemic. Nurses are trying to strike a new contractual deal as the current one expires on Thursday. Kaiser is only offering a meager 1% increase for all nurses and a 1% flat rate increase for each subsequent year of the contract.

Earlier this month, Alabama Resident Ray Martin DeMonia died of a cardiac event. He did not have COVID-19, but was turned away from 43 separate hospitals in three southern states seeking help for his condition. He died some 200 miles from his home in neighboring Mississippi, seeking a hospital capable of treating him.

Nurses at the University of Alabama Birmingham (UAB) hospital staged a one-day strike on September 6, saying they were “understaffed, overworked and underpaid” . About twenty employees of the emergency department showed up for their shift two hours late as a sign of solidarity. Dr Lindsey Harris, speaking on behalf of the Alabama Nursing Association, appealed to the university, saying that “if these issues are not addressed UAB and state hospitals risk losing their nurses for the benefit of jobs in other states “.

In Massachusetts, where there have been more than 800,000 recorded cases and 18,500 confirmed deaths, the longest nursing strike in state history continues at Saint Vincent Hospital at Tenet Healthcare in Worcester. Again, the primary demand of nurses is to have safe staffing ratios. While the Massachusetts Nurses Association (MNA) has negotiated for more than six months, behind closed doors, to reach a deal, nurses have yet to receive strike pay. Tenet called in 164 scabs in an attempt to replace the attackers for good. The MNA’s strategy has been to conduct protracted negotiations as the workers it nominally represents slowly starve on the picket lines.

Speaker of the House of Democrats Nancy Pelosi and U.S. Representative Jim McGovern met with the National MP earlier this month, the day after the sixth anniversary of the strike, to align with the union bureaucracy and position themselves as advocates for nurses. This follows several visits by Massachusetts Senator Elizabeth Warren where she told nurses she would support them until Tenet makes a deal. These are representatives of the same party that called the National Guard for a nurses’ strike in Connecticut earlier this year and is now threatening to do the same in New York.

Healthcare workers are not only fighting COVID-19 and the private healthcare system, but also unions, who each time sabotage their struggles and work to prevent them from bonding with their siblings through the country. To advance their struggle, healthcare workers must break away from pro-corporate unions and form grassroots committees, unite internationally with workers from all industries to eradicate COVID-19 and end to the for-profit health system.


9 out of 10 hospital and nursing home staff vaccinated: Hochul

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HUDSON VALLEY, NY – As Governor Kathy Hochul announced that healthcare worker vaccination rates were rising rapidly across New York state before the vaccination mandate for healthcare workers in hospitals took effect and nursing homes, Patch commentators continued to discuss it.

“This new information shows that firmly holding the immunization mandate for healthcare workers is simply the right thing to do to protect vulnerable family members and loved ones from COVID-19,” Hochul said. “I am happy to see healthcare workers getting vaccinated to keep New Yorkers safe, and I continue to monitor developments and stand ready to take action to alleviate potential situations of staff shortages in our areas. health systems. “

  • The percentage of nursing home staff receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine rose to 92% on Monday evening, from 71% on August 24, when Hochul was sworn in.
  • The percentage of staff in adult care facilities receiving at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine rose to 89% on Monday evening, from 77% on August 24.
  • The percentage of hospital staff receiving at least one dose was 92% on Monday evening based on preliminary self-reported data. The percentage of people fully vaccinated was 85% on Monday evening, up from 77% on August 24.

The data comes from a September 27 point-in-time survey of hospitals, nursing homes and adult care facilities by the New York Department of Health to determine the immunization status of workers in healthcare facilities.

“I can’t wait for New York’s health care system to collapse when it lays off 45,000 health workers!” Then I can watch all of the mandate colleagues cry on the sidewalk when hospitals turn them away or put them on a waiting list for treatment, ”says Will Norris.

But others supported the mandate.

“Patients come first,” said George Coniglio. “It’s one thing to put yourself in danger and your family in danger, but it is quite another to put patients at risk. We need staff who are ready to take on hospital missions.”


Facing Deadline, More NY Health Care Workers Get Vaccinated | News, Sports, Jobs


FILE – In this file photo from December 15, 2020, a droplet falls from a syringe after a person is injected with the Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine at a hospital in Providence, RI (AP Photo / David Goldman, File )

ALBANY (AP) – Thousands of healthcare workers in New York City facing either getting the COVID-19 vaccine or losing their jobs have received at least one dose as their worldwide mandate approaches State, according to state figures.

Hospital and nursing home workers had until Monday to get their first dose of vaccine under the new requirement, raising concerns among administrators that the reluctance could create dramatic staff shortages.

Gov. Kathy Hochul released figures Monday evening showing immunization rates are rising among the state’s 450,000 hospital workers and other healthcare workers. The figures were released as she signed an executive order giving her increased powers to address staff shortages.

As of Monday evening, 92% of nursing home staff had received at least one dose of the vaccine. And preliminary data showed that 92% of hospital staff were receiving at least one dose of the vaccine, the governor said.

State figures on Wednesday showed 84% of hospital workers were fully immunized.

The executive order allows out-of-state physicians, nurses and other health care professionals to practice in New York, facilitates retirees’ re-entry into the workforce, and allows physician visits to nursing homes by telemedicine.

Additionally, New York State Approved Providers without a current registration will be able to practice without penalty. And the order expands the roles of emergency medical technicians, for example by allowing basic paramedics to vaccinate and test for COVID-19.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press.

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NB Nursing Home Workers Call for Pay Rise to Help Staff Crisis

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MONCTON, NB – In a virtual press conference Monday, the union representing workers at several New Brunswick nursing homes urges Premier Blaine Higgs to address the current ‘staffing crisis’ in nursing homes in New Brunswick. Province.

The union is asking the Prime Minister to immediately increase their wages by $ 4 an hour. Sharon Teare, president of the New Brunswick Council of Nursing Home Unions, which represents 51 of the province’s 70 nursing homes, says several places in the province are operating with 50 percent of their staff or less, which does not not allow them to prioritize those entrusted to them.

“Now we’re at a point where retention and recruiting is crippling the industry and it can’t function anymore,” Teare said.

She said many staff members work double or triple shifts, while some show up for work injured.

According to Teare, the current average salary of a CUPE member working in a seniors’ residence in the province is $ 21.50.

CUPE New Brunswick communications representative Simon Oullette said “Members, workers are already voting with their feet, retiring early, having to take sick leave due to burnout or quitting altogether. field “.

At Monday’s press conference, workers explained how these issues not only affect them, but also the vulnerable people in their care.

” What’s going on? These residents who die alone and who are in palliative care because they do not have the hands to ensure that the palliative measures are applied. And this is not good. Residents do not eat breakfast due to lack of staff. “

The Department of Social Development responded to CTV’s request for a comment from the Premier by saying it takes the concerns raised by the NB Council of Nursing Home Unions very seriously and that the Department is working with its partners, including “the Department of Health and the Department of Post-Secondary Education, Training and Labor, to examine potential solutions.”

“This is one of the reasons the government has increased its annual budget by $ 15 million to increase hours of care to 3.3 hours by April 2022.”

In its statement, the ministry also said: “In accordance with the six-year bargaining agreement, officially adopted in May 2019, a 5.5% salary increase was agreed over a four-year period – most retroactively. – for employees “.

But Teare believes the change must happen soon. Due to an extreme staff shortage, residents do not eat breakfast and cannot always wash themselves once a week, she said.

“Residents have the right to take a bath at least once a week, not every two weeks.”

Without a change or increase in wages, workers say they are afraid of the future.

“The cost of doing nothing is much higher than the cost of fixing the problem,” Oulette said.


LI health workers face layoff as vaccination mandate goes into effect


Dozens of Northwell Health employees were fired on Monday after refusing to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

Health care workers in New York had until midnight to receive their first dose of the vaccine or face arrest.

“I appeal to all healthcare workers. First, those who got it – thank you. And for those who haven’t made that decision yet, please do the right thing,” the governor said. Kathy Hochul.

Some healthcare workers in Hauppauge say the mandate is unfair and devastating. They are demanding that the state take immediate action so that they do not lose their jobs for choosing not to receive the COVID-19 vaccine.

“I don’t want to lose my job,” says TonyLunn Sterk, a registered nurse. “I’ve been there for 21 years. I want to work everyday. I didn’t run away when the pandemic hit. I stayed there alongside my frontline fighting staff and today we are considered zeros compared to the heroes of last year.

Other workers have expressed concerns about their patients in the hospital and their own ability to pay their bills if they lose their jobs.

Representative Lee Zeldin and other lawmakers called on Hochul to allow alternatives to the vaccine, such as wearing appropriate personal protective equipment and consistent testing, but the governor stood firm on the vaccine’s mandate on Monday.

“Can’t we just say it’s a basic human right,” Hochul said. “That anyone who enters a hospital or health facility will be treated by someone who has been vaccinated. ”

Northwell Health said it had already parted with two dozen unvaccinated executives and they would fire the rest of the unvaccinated employees as well.

Additionally, SUNY officials say those who have not received at least one dose of the vaccine in their hospital system to date will result in their immediate suspension and pending termination on Tuesday.

A spokesperson for NYU Langone said the hospital system is collecting data from all locations for accuracy and will report it once it’s completed.

Stony Brook University Hospital said on Monday afternoon that 90% of its employees had been vaccinated.

Unvaccinated employees have been suspended without pay and received an email after leaving work, stating in part: “Your continued presence at work represents a potential danger to the hospital, patients and the community and / or interferes seriously with our operations.

According to Mount Sinai South Nassau, about 87 employees remain unvaccinated and risk suspension without pay.

Catholic Health says unvaccinated employees will be put on leave for two weeks and then considered to have resigned if they are still unvaccinated.

Administrators of the Jewish Gurwin health care system in Commack said around 100 employees decided to get the vaccine in the days leading up to the deadline. The establishment claims to have lost 27 employees as a result of the mandate.

“It’s hard to lose staff,” says Stuart Almer of Gurwin Health Care System. “It’s a very difficult time for all of us in terms of recruitment and retention. ”

Hospital systems tell News 12 that patient care will not be affected.

An emergency room doctor told News 12 off camera that there would likely be some slowdown, but nothing that would threaten anyone’s safety.

Stony Brook Hospital could plan ahead as they are hosting a career fair next week.

All employees of hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of the vaccine to keep their jobs. The only way to get around this is to file a religious exemption.

News 12 awaits figures for the number of healthcare workers who will be out of work.

Some tell News 12 that they asked for an exemption and were denied.

Health care flies in the face of vaccines mandate, says it won’t give in to the pressure.

“We didn’t ask to be in this position, we were pushed into this position,” says Donna Aliperti, a nurse in the neonatal intensive care unit. “And we will not back down. “

Hochul says she is ready to help hospitals facing significant problems due to staff shortages. If the situation were so serious, a state of emergency could be declared and the National Guard could be brought in to help.

Nassau County Director Laura Curran says she believes hospital systems are ready to provide quality care with the mandate in place. She says that as a precaution, she activated the Nassau Emergency Management Office to stay in constant contact with hospitals and to help them with staff shortages.

NORTHWELL HEALTH FULL STATEMENT:

Northwell spent several weeks preparing for New York state’s mandate that all healthcare workers receive at least one dose of the COVID-19 vaccine by September 27. But we are taking even stricter measures to keep our staff safe and, more importantly. , the well-being of our patients and the communities we serve. As a healthcare system, we are committed to immunizing all of our staff beyond the scope of the state mandate to include both our clinical and non-clinical staff. A few hundred unvaccinated leaders were contacted last week to take urgent action to get vaccinated. About two dozen of those who were still unvaccinated were taken out of the system. We are now beginning the process of discharging the rest of our unvaccinated staff. Northwell wants to reassure the public that during this time there will be no impact on the quality of patient care at any of our facilities. We are proud that our workforce is already nearly 100 percent vaccinated. As healthcare professionals and members of New York State’s largest healthcare provider, we have a unique responsibility to protect the health of our patients and that of others. We take care of sick people – some seriously ill – every day, and we are responsible for their safety in our car.



IDPH official discusses retirement home inspections and complaints

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EDWARDSVILLE – In regulating long-term care facilities and state nursing homes, the Illinois Department of Public Health conducts annual inspections at these facilities, and these inspections sometimes result in fines when violations are noted.

But fines can also be imposed following a complaint against an establishment if an investigation by the IDPH reveals that there have indeed been violations.

“We are reviewing what policies and procedures are in place and whether the facility has followed those policies and procedures,” said Melaney Arnold, public information officer for IDPH. “A type AA violation is the highest level of violation and normally results in serious injury or death. A Type A violation is the second most serious and involves a condition or event that has the probability of death or serious harm to a resident or has resulted in actual physical or mental harm.

“From there it goes down to types B and C and finally an administrative warning. A Type B violation means that there is a condition related to the operation of the installation which could potentially result in minimal physical or mental damage. “

She said the amounts of the fines are defined by law. “The fines are doubled for offenses with a high risk designation. This happens frequently.

After being cited with a violation by the HDI, depending on the severity of the violation, an institution is required to submit what is called a remediation plan, which details what it is doing to correct the deficiency.

“If there is a hole in these policies or procedures, they have to take care of what needs to be done,” Arnold said. “For example, if you had staff who were not following the correct procedure on something, you could take on-the-job training, so that they would then be aware of the latest policies and procedures.

“We do an annual inspection, but anyone can file a complaint at any time. If we find that the complaint is valid, we will go to the establishment and investigate. “

The COVID-19 pandemic has added an extra layer to an already complex system of nursing home inspections by the IDPH.

“There are annual inspections that take place in nursing homes that typically look at everything in the facility,” Arnold said. “When you have a complaint violation, it will review that specific complaint to see what policies and procedures are in place that could have prevented the violation from occurring to begin with.

“With COVID, there were special infection control investigations where we went to the facilities and specifically looked at the control procedures.”

The timeframe for the IDPH to investigate a suspected violation may vary.

“It depends on whether it’s an annual survey or a complaints investigation, and it may take a day or two to get into a facility or more, depending on what we find,” Arnold said. “After that, the investigative report goes back to a central office where it is reviewed to determine any shortcomings and any kind of citations or violations that we are going to publish.

“Once we have provided this information to the establishment, it must then come back to us with a correction plan if necessary. They have the ability to challenge the subpoenas that we issue, and it’s an administrative process similar to a civil court where you can request a hearing, and it can take several months.

To file a complaint with the IDPH about a retirement home, call the Central Complaints Registry hotline at 800-252-4343.


BaccMD graduate wants to serve marginalized populations, expand access to healthcare


Kassandra Jean-Marie, a second-year medical student whose journey to becoming a doctor has taken her twice through the halls of UMass Chan Medical School, wanted to be a doctor from an early age. Her reasons, however, have changed over the years, shaped by her parents’ experiences and her own observations. Jean-Marie was born in Boston; his parents were born in Haiti.

“I’m really passionate about people who don’t have access to health care, or their access to health care is very limited or segmented,” said Jean-Marie. “I think of my family members. The only time they’ve had a physical exam is when they absolutely have to do it for a new job. And then they ended up paying out of pocket because they didn’t have health insurance.

This passion drew Jean-Marie to the Population-based Urban and Rural Community Health (PURCH) track, an option for students at TH Chan School of Medicine that focuses on health care disparities and issues. health specific to urban and rural communities.

“We are getting information on how best to serve marginalized people, knowing that the health system has not always been kind to them,” said Jean-Marie. “How do you give access to health care to people who may not want to go to the hospital because they are afraid – if they do not have papers or a green card – that they will get deported? These people obviously deserve and still need health care, so what can we do to help them? “

Following the August 14 earthquake in Haiti, Jean-Marie organized a collection of bandages, soap, hand sanitizer and other supplies. In September, she was appointed to the Springfield COVID-19 Youth Council, where she is responsible for providing information and education on the COVID-19 vaccine to residents 35 and under. She volunteers at the student-run Worcester Asylum Clinic and Lawrence General Hospital. She is also a member of the Student National Medical Association (SNMA), a national organization that supports medical students from underrepresented minorities. She has been with SNMA since she was a student at UMass Amherst, where she obtained a bachelor’s degree in microbiology and public health. Having obtained his certification at the age of 17, Jean-Marie worked as a certified nursing assistant until college.

During the summers after his graduate years, Jean-Marie completed the UMass Baccalaureate MD Pathway program. The BaccMD program is open to students on UMass undergraduate campuses from racial or ethnic groups underrepresented in medicine, from economically disadvantaged backgrounds, or first generation graduates.

As for what comes after medical school, Jean-Marie is interested in infectious diseases and works in a community health setting with first and second generation American refugees, asylum seekers and immigrants. Or maybe she will end up working in primary care, maybe in Haiti or some other developing country.

“When we talk about many debilitating diseases, we are talking about the lack of primary care in many of these areas. These diseases, ultimately, are somewhat incurable. We can provide drugs and sometimes intervene, but the disease itself never goes away. And sometimes that’s because it’s taken too late. So primary care, I think, is just extremely important, ”said Jean-Marie.

The Student Spotlight series features students from UMass Chan Medical School in the Morningside Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Tan Chingfen Graduate School of Nursing and TH Chan School of Medicine. For more information about UMass Chan Medical School and how to apply, visit Future students page.

Related Articles on UMassMed News:
NBC10-Boston report highlights role of UMass BaccMD program in reducing health disparities
The summer enrichment program prepares undergraduate aspirants with a dose of rigor in medical schools


Louisiana officials grilled after botched evacuation of nursing home

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Louisiana lawmakers on Friday demanded responses from health officials about the poorly managed evacuation of the nursing home that left several dead and resulted in the revocation of their licenses at seven facilities.

The hearing is in response to outrage over the evacuation to a warehouse of more than 800 residents in anticipation of Hurricane Ida, The Daily Advertiser first reported. The residents were all from facilities owned by Baton Rouge developer Bob Dean, who also owned the warehouse. Health ministry officials called the conditions in the unsanitary warehouse “inhumane.”

The death toll among residents has since risen to 15. The state of Louisiana, in response to the evacuation, revoked licenses and terminated the state’s Medicaid provider agreements for the facilities.

Asked whether the warehouse only has portable toilets, regulatory affairs director Stephen Russo said the health department does not approve evacuation plans but revises them instead.

“I keep coming back to the nursing home who is responsible for the health and safety of their residents,” Russo said.

Lawmakers have signaled that stricter oversight may be underway for suppliers.

“It was a catastrophic failure,” said Republican Senator from Covington, Patrick McMath. “I think requiring a permanent toilet with disabled access at an evacuation site seems like common sense.”


New York expects healthcare worker shortage ahead of vaccination mandate deadline: NPR


A view of the entrance to Mount Sinai Hospital in New York on May 14, 2020. Employees of New York City hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by Monday , raising concerns about non-compliance and potential staff shortages.

Cindy Ord / Getty Images


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Cindy Ord / Getty Images


A view of the entrance to Mount Sinai Hospital in New York on May 14, 2020. Employees of New York City hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by Monday , raising concerns about non-compliance and potential staff shortages.

Cindy Ord / Getty Images

New York state officials brace for a staffing shortage when the mandate to vaccinate state health workers goes into effect Monday, and could look to the National Guard – as well as medical professionals other states and countries – to help them fix it.

Gov. Kathy Hochul on Saturday released a plan outlining steps she could take to increase staff in the event that large numbers of hospital and nursing home workers miss the state deadline.

“We are still in a battle against COVID to protect our loved ones, and we must fight with all the tools at our disposal,” she said.

That could mean declaring a state of emergency to allow licensed medical professionals outside of New York City, as well as recent graduates and retirees, to practice there. Other options include deploying medically trained National Guard members, partnering with the federal government to send disaster medical assistance teams to local health and medical systems, and “explore ways to accelerate visa applications for health professionals ”.

The state labor department also issued guidelines clarifying that workers made redundant because they refuse to be vaccinated will not be eligible for unemployment insurance, “absent a valid application for medical accommodation approved by a physician “.

All healthcare workers in New York City hospitals and nursing homes must have at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine by Monday, according to state regulations and a warrant issued by the former Governor Andrew Cuomo last month. Staff in other facilities, including home care, hospices and adult care facilities, should be vaccinated before October 7.

The most recent figures suggest the state still has some way to go: As of Wednesday, 84% of all hospital workers were fully immunized. And 81% of staff at all adult care facilities and 77% of staff at nursing facilities were fully immunized as of Thursday.

State and nationwide health care systems are already struggling with staff shortages.

Critics of the requirement have challenged it through protests and lawsuits, as reported by North Country Public Radio, opposing mandatory vaccination and challenging the lack of exemptions for religious objections.

At this point, healthcare workers have the option to apply for a religious exemption at least until October 12, when a federal judge will consider a court challenge in favor of such exemptions.

As hospitals prepared their contingency plans – many of which included limiting certain procedures – at the end of last week, Hochul stuck to the deadline. She told reporters on Thursday that there was “no excuse” for workers to refuse to be vaccinated, and called the looming shortages “completely preventable.”

How health systems prepare for the deadline

Hospital systems and nursing homes statewide are encouraging their employees to get vaccinated and prepare for disruptions if they don’t. Some cut back on elective surgeries, limit admissions, and retain volunteers.

Northwell Health, the state’s largest health care provider, has held meetings with staff members in an attempt to persuade “thousands of holdouts,” the Associated Press reports. Some 90% of its 74,000 active staff had been vaccinated as of Thursday, although the hospital said it does not expect full compliance and has more than 3,000 retirees, students and volunteers in waiting.

Erie County Medical Center Corporation in Buffalo predicts that about 10% of its workforce (some 400 workers) may not be vaccinated by Monday, according to AP, and is prepared to potentially suspend elective hospital surgeries, cut back on hours in outpatient clinics and temporarily stop accepting Intensive Care Transfers.

As reported by NPR, the Lewis County General Hospital in Lowville, NY, said it would suspend maternity services starting this weekend because dozens of staff resigned rather than to get vaccinated.

Unvaccinated employees at New York City’s 11 public hospitals (which cites a compliance rate of around 88%) will be put on unpaid leave but could return to work if they get vaccinated soon, CNN reports.

Some hospital systems are seeing increased vaccination rates. New York-Presbyterian, for example, enacted its own mandate with a deadline of midnight Wednesday, and reported that only 250 of its 48,000 employees had not complied.

The University of Rochester Medical Center said in a statement that 99% of professional medical staff and 91% of all employees at its six hospitals were partially or fully vaccinated last week.

Dr Michael Apostolakos, its chief medical officer, said intensive care and many essential services will continue uninterrupted – but staff shortages unrelated to the mandate are causing some wards to hiatus.

Patients will see longer wait times for routine appointments, some employees will be asked to take on additional responsibilities, and beds may be temporarily closed, Apostolakos said in a statement.

A piece of a national conversation

New York isn’t the only place to require vaccination of healthcare workers – California announced a similar policy over the summer, and the US Department of Veterans Affairs is also requiring healthcare workers first. line get vaccinated.

President Biden announced earlier this month that the 17 million healthcare workers in facilities that receive Medicare or Medicaid funding will need to be vaccinated or regularly tested, with details to be finalized in the coming weeks.

While such demands in the workplace have the backing of many public health experts – and more than half of nurses, according to a recent survey – some politicians and hospital officials have expressed concern. And this is especially true in rural areas, where vaccination rates are low and hiring is already difficult.

Chiquita Brooks-LaSure, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, told NPR that the Biden administration was pursuing a tenure due to stagnant vaccination rates in hospitals across the country. She noted that while many hospitals are worried about staff shortages, employees missing from work due to illness or quarantine are also a staffing issue – and safety.

“It is very clear from the data that unvaccinated staff affects both patients entering facilities as well as their colleagues,” she said.

It remains to be seen how severe the staff shortages will be, in New York and elsewhere. Although a state has already adopted a mandate to vaccinate healthcare workers and could serve as a data point.

The governor of Maine announced a mandate for the healthcare workers in mid-August, and hospitals are reporting only a handful of resignations so far – although the application does not begin until October 29.


Alleged neglect: Woman claims nursing home killed her mother | New

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When Treca Finchum’s mother was admitted to hospital after a year and four months in Asbury Place, Maryville, she had a thick layer of dried saliva tangled in a corner of her mouth which hospital nurses cleaned up.

She was awake but not responding. Finchum said when she leaned over and shouted her mother’s name near her face, she opened her eyes for a moment. She said doctors told her they didn’t think they would be able to keep her alive, and she was returned to Asbury on hospice care.

On December 29, 2020, Carolyn Finchum passed away in her bedroom in Asbury. Around the same time, her daughter contacted lawyers in Nashville, preparing a lawsuit against Asbury, alleging medical malpractice.

Carolyn was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease in 2019. Finchum didn’t want to put her in a nursing home, but said she had no other choice. No other family member wanted to take care of her because they had a bad relationship. Her care was left to Finchum, who also disliked her mother.

“We thought when she had Alzheimer’s disease that she had gotten mild because they usually turn (right) the opposite; no, it just got worse, ”Finchum said. “She was mean, but she was my mother.”

When she placed her mother in Asbury’s Assisted Living Program, since it was close to her home in Alcoa, she said she told employees her mother was “mean” and never turn your back on him. Asbury has transported Carolyn to a mental institution on two separate occasions, Finchum said, for attacking staff.

More than money

She said it wasn’t about the money or her mother’s memory. She believes the lawsuit has the potential to fix a problem she says she has seen since the 1980s: neglect in nursing homes.

After working at a nursing home, Finchum said she quit because she was tired of how patients were treated by staff. She said she believed her great-grandmother and grandfather were also abused.

“The money won’t bring my mom back, you know, it won’t do anything,” Finchum said. “I have already paid for a funeral, it has paid off. So, you know, it’s not the money.

The complaint was filed with the legal division of the Blount County Circuit Court on September 17 and cites her mother’s wrongful death for medical malpractice.

It included two counts of negligence: “Tennessee medical malpractice negligence” and “gross, willful, gratuitous, reckless, malicious and / or intentional negligence.”

Cathy Canning, spokesperson for Asbury, said on behalf of the company: “We deny the allegations in this complaint, but we sympathize with family members who must overcome these challenges and the grief of losing a loved one. . Asbury is a faith-based, non-profit organization that has served the elderly of East Tennessee for over 65 years, many of whom suffer from complex physical and cognitive challenges. The health and well-being of our residents has always been and remains our top priority. “

In 2016 and 2018, two court cases were filed against Asbury for medical malpractice. The Daily Times does not know the ruling in either case.

In addition, a Daily Times report from September 2018 said Asbury was fined $ 45,000 by the Tennessee Department of Health and was prohibited from taking on new residents for a limited time. . Investigators inspected Asbury’s facilities and found they violated basic administration and service standards.

Each month, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services update and publish a list of nursing homes in America with quality issues.

As of August 2021, Asbury had been on the list for 27 months, the longest of any nursing home in Tennessee.

“If you can’t work with children in adult bodies,” Finchum said, “you don’t have to be in a nursing home because that’s all they are, they are children in adult bodies. “

Build a folder

The court complaint says Asbury did not “implement a system to ensure Ms Finchum was properly supervised and protected against acts of abuse and neglect”.

Asbury’s Assisted Living Program terms and conditions state that they are responsible for creating a plan to ensure the well-being of their patients. He adds that if a patient’s condition worsens to the point that their facilities are unable to maintain their well-being, they will be transported elsewhere.

Finchum visited his mother several times a week until February 2020, when Asbury stopped allowing visits due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The next time Finchum saw his mother was in December 2020, when she was rushed to UT Medical Center. She died shortly after.

In December, Finchum got a call from Asbury, informing him that his mother needed a hospice due to certain test results. Finchum was unaware that tests had been carried out and said she had requested that her mother be sent to the hospital.

Finchum said the on-site doctor Jennifer Ranson and a nurse recommended that he take a lawyer because it looked like negligence. Asbury’s test results were two weeks old, she said, adding that Ranson told her her mother should have been in hospital three weeks ago.

Court records show Finchum’s mother suffered from malnutrition, dehydration, infections, delayed care, abuse, neglect, severe pain and death due to inadequate care.

His death certificate lists complications from Alzheimer’s disease as the leading cause of death and COVID-19 infection as the underlying cause. At the end of the summer, Finchum said Asbury staff told him his mother had contracted COVID-19 but had recovered, except for a mild cough.

She said she hadn’t heard anything from them until December.

The court complaint says Finchum “seeks compensatory and punitive damages in an amount to be determined by the jury, plus costs and any other relief to which she is entitled under the law.”


To vaccinate veterans, healthcare workers must cross mountains, plains and tundra | Health, medicine and fitness


A Learjet 31 took off before dawn from Helena Regional Airport in Montana, carrying six Veterans Affairs medical providers and 250 doses of historic cargo cradled in a plug-in cooler designed to minimize breakage.

Even in a condition where speed limits of 80 mph are normal, long-distance ground transportation is risky for Moderna mRNA-1273 vaccine, which must be used within 12 hours of thawing.

The group’s destination was Havre, Montana, 30 miles from the Canadian border. About 500 military veterans live in and around this small town of about 9,800 people, and millions more reside in rural and hard-to-reach areas in the United States.

About 2.7 million veterans who use the VA health system are classified as “rural” or “very rural” patients, residing in communities or on land with fewer services and less access to health care. than those in densely populated cities. According to the department, an additional 2 million veterans live in remote areas and are not receiving their VA health care. To ensure these rural vets have access to covid vaccines, the VA relies on a mix of tools, such as charter and commercial planes and partnerships with civilian health organizations.

The challenges of immunizing ex-combatants in rural areas – which the VA considers to be anything outside an urban population center – and “very rural” areas – defined as having less than 10% of the population. workforce moving to an urban center and with a population of no more than 2,500 – expand beyond geography, as more than 55% of them are 65 years or older and are at risk of severe cases of covid and only 65% ​​can be reached via the Internet.

For the Le Havre event, VA clinic workers called every patient served by the Merril Lundman VA outpatient clinic in a large area made up of small farming and ranching communities and two Native American reservations. And for those who were hesitant to get vaccinated, a nurse called them back to answer questions.

“At least 10 more veterans chose to be vaccinated after we answered their questions,” said Judy Hayman, executive director of the Montana VA Health Care System, serving the state’s 147,000 square miles.

The Le Havre mission was a test flight for similar efforts in other rural areas. Thirteen days later, another plane took off for Kalispell, MT, carrying vaccines for 400 veterans.

In Alaska, another rural state, administrators at the Anchorage Veterans’ Medical Center on Thursday finalized plans for suppliers to take an Alaska Airlines commercial flight to Kodiak Island. There, VA workers were to administer 100 to 150 doses at an immunization clinic run in partnership with the Kodiak Area Native Association.

“Our goal is to vaccinate all veterans who have not been vaccinated in and around the Kodiak community,” said Tom Steinbrunner, acting director of the Alaska VA Health System.

VA began educating rural veterans for the immunization program late last year, as the Food and Drug Administration approached emergency use authorization issuance dates for Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines. , according to Dr. Richard Stone, the acting officer of the Veterans Health Administration. assistant secretary. It made sense to turn to planes to deliver the vaccines. “It seemed logical to us to reach rural areas which, [like] in Montana, we had a contract with a company that had small propeller planes and short runway capability, ”said Stone, a retired Army Reserve Major General.

Veterans responded, Stone added, with more than 50% of rural veterans making appointments.

As of Wednesday, the VA had counted 220,992 confirmed cases of covid among veterans and VA employees and 10,065 known deaths, including 128 employees. As of Wednesday, VA had administered 1,344,210 doses of the Pfizer or Moderna vaccine, including 329,685 second vaccines, to veterans. According to the VA, about 25% of these ex-combatants live in rural areas, 2.81% live in very rural areas and 1.13% live on remote islands.

For rural areas, the VA has relied primarily on the Moderna vaccine, which requires cold storage between minus 25 degrees centigrade (minus 13 degrees Fahrenheit) and minus 15 degrees C (5 degrees F), but not the necessary freezer. to store the Pfizer vaccine (minus 70 degrees C or minus 94 degrees F). This, according to the VA, makes it more “transportable to rural areas”.

The VA predicts that the Johnson & Johnson single-dose vaccine, if it receives emergency use clearance from the FDA, will make it even easier to reach distant veterans. Moderna’s and Pfizer-BioNTech’s vaccines both require two injections, spaced a few weeks apart. “One dose will allow veterans in rural areas, who often have to travel long distances, to achieve their full immunization coverage,” VA spokeswoman Gina Jackson said. The FDA’s vaccine advisory committee is set to meet on February 26 to review J & J’s clearance request.

Meanwhile, in places like Alaska, where hundreds of veterans live outside the network, VA officials have had to get creative. Flying to serve individual veterans would be too expensive, which is why Anchorage VA Medical Center has partnered with tribal healthcare organizations to ensure veterans have access to a vaccine. Under these agreements, all veterans, including non-native veterans, can be seen in tribal facilities.

“This is our main outreach in much of Alaska because the tribal health system is the only health system in these communities,” said Steinbrunner.

In some rural areas, however, the process has proved frustrating. Army veteran John Hoefen, 73, served in Vietnam and has a 100% AV disability rating for Parkinson’s disease linked to exposure to Agent Orange. He is receiving his medical care from a VA site in Canandaigua, New York, 20 miles from his home, but the facility has not specified what phase of the vaccine rollout he is in, Hoefen said.

The hospital’s website simply says that a staff member will contact veterans when they become eligible – a “don’t call us, we’ll call you,” he said. “I know a lot of veterans like me who are 100% disabled and speechless,” Hoefen said. “I went there for audiology a few weeks ago and my technician had not even received his vaccine yet.”

VA Canandaigua referred questions about the current phase of the establishment to its website: “If you are eligible for a vaccine, your VA health care team will contact you by phone, SMS, or secure message (via MyHealtheVet) to take appointment, “it says. A call to the special covid-19 phone number set up for the Canandaigua VA, which falls under the department’s Finger Lakes Health System, places the caller on the main hospital services menu, without any specific information on vaccine distribution.

For the most part, the VA uses guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to determine priority groups for vaccines. After immunizing most of its health workers and first responders, as well as residents of VA nursing homes, it vaccinated those 75 and older, as well as those with chronic illnesses that put them at risk for severe cases of covid. In some places, like Anchorage and throughout Montana, clinics vaccinate people 65 and over and go walk-in when extra doses are available.

According to Lori FitzGerald, chief of pharmacy at VA Hospital in Fort Harrison, MT, providers ended up with extra doses that went to inpatients or veterans seen at the facility. Only one dose was wasted in Montana, she said.

To determine vaccine eligibility, facilities use databases and algorithms from the Veterans Health Administration Support Service Center to aid in the decision-making process. The facilities then notify veterans by mail, email, or phone or through VA portals of their eligibility and when they can expect to be vaccinated, depending on the department.

Air Force veteran Theresa Petersen, 83, was delighted that she and her husband, an 89-year-old U.S. Navy veteran, were able to get their shots at the Kalispell event. She said they had been informed by their primary care provider of the opportunity and jumped at the opportunity.

“I would do anything to give the Veterans Affairs medical system as much credit as possible,” said Petersen. “I’m so in love with the concept, ‘Yes there are people who live in rural America and they have health issues too. “”

The VA is authorized to provide vaccines only to veterans currently enrolled in VA health care. About 9 million US veterans are not registered with the VA, including 2 million rural veterans.

After veterans were turned away from a VA clinic in West Palm Beach, Florida in January, Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) Wrote to acting VA secretary Dat Tran urging her to include these veterans in their covid vaccination program.

Stone said the agency was not licensed to provide services to these veterans. “We have had discussions with Capitol Hill on how to reconcile this,” he said. “Some of them are very old veterans and we don’t want to turn anyone away. “

This story was originally published by Kaiser Health News.


Death toll rises to 15 among nursing home residents evacuated to Tangipahoa warehouse

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BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (BRPROUD) – Fifteen of the nearly 850 nursing home residents evacuated to a warehouse in the parish of Tangipahoa before Hurricane Ida died, according to the Louisiana Department of Health (LDH).

LDH said a coroner had confirmed five deaths were linked to the storm.

“Additional deaths can be considered storm-related pending autopsy / pathology results, but to highlight these deaths have yet to be classified as storm-related,” Mindy Faciane said, LDH public information office.

Faciane said in an email that the death toll is likely to increase.

“Over time and given the health conditions that required a level of nursing home care, unfortunately the number of deaths among this group is likely to increase,” Faciane said. “This is why it is important to distinguish between the total number of deaths from any cause and the number of storm-related deaths.”

The seven nursing homes that were evacuated to the warehouse belong to Bob Dean. Dean’s portrayal John McLindon said the five people who died during or around the evacuation were all in hospice care.

LDH stripped nursing homes of their licenses. McLindon said they are appealing for the reinstatement of the licenses.

Dean faces seven lawsuits and one survey bYes the attorney general according to McLindon.

McLindon said they are “cooperating as much as possible”.


New York braces for possible staff shortages as healthcare COVID vaccination mandate approaches


Governor Kathy Hochul said on Saturday she was ready to bring in medically trained National Guard members, retirees and workers outside New York to deal with potential staff shortages caused by the ‘approach of a COVID-19[female[feminine vaccination mandate for health workers.

If necessary, Hochul said, she will declare a state of emergency through an executive order to address staffing shortages in hospitals and nursing homes once the warrant goes into effect on Monday.

Many healthcare workers still haven’t received the required first injection of the COVID-19 vaccine days before the deadline, leaving the possibility that thousands of healthcare workers will be forced out of work next week.

The order would allow medical professionals licensed in other states or countries, recent graduates or former medical professionals to practice in New York City, Hochul said, noting that she was exploring ways to speed up visa applications for health professionals.

The governor said she also has the option of deploying members of the National Guard and partnering with the federal government to deploy disaster medical assistance teams.

“I am closely monitoring the staff situation and we have a plan to increase our health care workforce and help ease the burden on our hospitals and other health facilities,” she said in a prepared statement.

State hospitals prepared contingency plans that included reducing elective surgeries. Many retirement homes restricted admissions.

“We are currently about 84% vaccinated statewide, so any initiatives the governor might come up with to increase staffing are welcome and necessary,” said Stephen Hanse, who represents nursing homes across the country. ‘State as president of the New York State Health Facilities Association. and the New York State Center for Assisted Living.

Hochul, a Democrat, has resisted calls to delay the mandate, and her 11-hour announcement could increase pressure on vaccine laggers. She said workers fired for refusing to be vaccinated are not eligible for unemployment insurance without a medical accommodation application approved by a doctor.


Nursing Home Workers Face Monday’s Immunization Deadline | New

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OLEAN – At last count, 62% of employees at Pines Nursing Home in Cattaraugus County had been vaccinated against COVID-19 as mandated by the New York State Department of Health on Monday at midnight.

This could represent as many as 100 employees spread across both Olean and Machias Pines, including an unknown number of certified nurses and orderlies.

“Cattaraugus County continues to encourage employees at its Pines nursing home to get vaccinated against COVID-19,” county administrator Jack Searles said on Friday. “There are immunization clinics today and again on Monday to try to encourage people to get the vaccine.”

Searles said: “We have until the end of Monday to get as many people vaccinated as possible.”

County nursing homes have suspended all new admissions until the impact of the vaccination mandate on nursing home staff is clear.

The Cattaraugus County Legislature has allowed County Attorney Ashley Milliman to take legal action to try to block the warrant.

A federal judge in Utica issued a temporary restraining order on September 15 to prevent the state from enforcing the vaccination mandate for healthcare workers on the grounds that it violated their constitutional rights because it did not there was no religious exemption. Arguments in the case will be heard on Tuesday.

Searles said there appears to be a disconnect with the reporting of vaccinated nursing home workers on the state’s website.

“Some employees come to our clinics or show up with vaccination certificates,” Searles said. “We probably won’t know the number of nursing home workers who are vaccinated until after midnight Monday.”

Searles said he does not have the current number or percentage of county nursing home workers who are vaccinated. Nursing home workers are expected to have their first injection no later than Monday. Health service workers must have their first injection before October 7.

“The number changes every day,” he said. “I believe we are much better than the state website shows. Monday we will be much better. There has been constant improvement. We are progressing.

Deputy Administrator Kelly Reed, who oversees county nursing homes as the nursing home administrator, was unavailable for comment.

“We still believe there should have been at least one religious option to the vaccination mandate,” Searles said.

This could be decided as early as Tuesday in the Federal Court of Utica.

Searles said the county was disappointed the state had not allowed the vaccine requirement to be withdrawn for frequent testing. “We’ve been doing it for a year and a half. It succeeded. It is not fair to ignore the concept of testing altogether.

This is what is creating the current crisis in other nursing homes and hospitals across the state, Searles said. “Other places, including the school, have an option to opt out of testing. The only standard we are held to is the vaccination rate. We did not have due process here. It is a mandate that is imposed on us and that is unconstitutional. We will continue to pursue our legal action with New York State on this matter. “

Searles added, “In the meantime, we will do everything in our power to encourage people to get vaccinated. I expect a number of people will not (get vaccinated).

The state Department of Health’s vaccine guidelines for nursing home employees allow for a medical exemption that must be signed by a physician or medical assistant.

Searles said that, under the directive, if a nursing home employee chooses not to be vaccinated against COVID-19, “they will not be allowed to work in the facility.”

Searles said the nursing home administration “supports shift changes.” Nursing homes operate 24/7 with three shifts. The county has hired at least three companies that hire healthcare workers, including registered nurses, for nursing homes and other long-term care facilities.

“Things are changing quickly,” Searles said. “We’re making a lot of progress, but we’re not done yet. We have not been able to recruit additional staff to work at our facilities. Health is a profession in demand. We are in open competition with all other medical providers in the region and region. “

Searles said the county’s first effort was to use its own staff in nursing homes. “If I have a low-staffed shift, I still have to provide quality service. “

County officials are working with union members on impact negotiations, Searles said. “The intention is to preserve individuals as county employees for as long as we can.”


Nurses discuss impact of New York State’s immunization mandate on healthcare system


Healthcare workers fear this will cause an even greater shortage of workers, which will ultimately have a ripple effect as Monday’s deadline approaches.

BUFFALO, NY – Healthcare workers in nursing homes and hospitals statewide must be vaccinated by Monday or may be unemployed.

As Monday approaches, even nurses who were already vaccinated are starting to worry.

“Vaccinated health workers will always try to help those who need help in these hospitals or nursing homes and they may not have the staff to support them,” said Candace Bliss.

Bliss received the vaccine as soon as it was available and is a nurse in Wyoming County. She has seen nursing students quit their programs before because they don’t want to be vaccinated.

“It’s really sad because it’s going to affect the future of healthcare,” Bliss said. “It is a scary time whether you are vaccinated or not.”

A Utica judge has temporarily blocked the warrant until Oct. 12 for healthcare workers who file for religious exemption, such as Catholic healthcare nurse Jillian Dobrzenski.

After October 12, she will be put on unpaid leave for 30 days and then fired. That is unless the judge sides with the health care workers who filed the complaint.

With many workers leaving on Monday, Dobrzenski doesn’t expect things to get any better for the state’s healthcare system.

“You take us away, this personnel problem is exacerbated. The patient is suffering, the community is suffering, and my vaccinated colleagues who still have work are suffering because they no longer have to work without our help,” said Dobrzenski.

Catholic health officials are not disclosing how many of their employees have requested a religious exemption.

Officials say the hospital system supports Gov. Kathy Hochul’s decision to go ahead with the mandate. This is because they say through science and data the vaccine has been proven to end the pandemic.

Catholic Health did not say how many workers have applied for a religious exemption, but 83% of workers are vaccinated there.

Meanwhile, Gov. Hochul said if the number of healthcare workers were not vaccinated enough by Monday, she would announce initiatives to help facilities cope with the shortages.

Local nurses aren’t sure the warrant is the answer.

“I think people should be vaccinated, but on the other hand, it’s such a difficult balance right now. I don’t know what the correct answer is. I don’t know if that’s that mandate,” Bliss said.


COVID outbreak in Washington nursing home kills 5, infects dozens

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A nursing home is trying to tackle a COVID-19 outbreak that began in August, when the first new case was confirmed.

The Pinewood Terrace Nursing Center in Colville, Washington has seen 22 employees and 52 residents test positive for the coronavirus and five deaths. The first case was reported on August 25, according to the Northeastern Three Counties Health District.

Of the 74 people infected in total, 33 were fully vaccinated and of the five residents who died, one was fully vaccinated.

“This speaks to the seriousness and danger that the delta variant poses to all individuals,” a county spokesperson said in a statement. “It also shows the vaccine’s ability to protect against serious illness in those who have been vaccinated. “

More than half, 64.5%, of nursing home residents are vaccinated, but only 37.1% of staff are also vaccinated as of September 5, according to Medicare.gov.

News from the retirement home:The official tally of coronavirus toll in nursing homes likely missed 16,000 deaths; 68,000 cases

Following:Could COVID-19 Precautions Break the Stigma and Spread of Lice? School nurses see the promise

Tri-County Health, which covers Ferry, Pend Oreille and Stevens County, currently has 5,965 positive cases of COVID-19. Pinewood Terrace is located in Stevens County, which has the highest number of positive cases out of the three counties and has had 35 COVID-related deaths since September 1, the health district said.

“We are seeing firsthand that your age, gender, medical condition and demographics do not protect you from the severity of this virus,” they said in a statement.

About 2,500 miles away, another nursing home is fighting the same fight.

The Honolulu Care Center in Nuuanu, Hawaii, currently has 54 infected patients and two dozen employees, forcing nurses to care for the center’s 182 licensed beds, the Featured Advertiser Reports.

The Care Center of Honolulu told the Star Advertiser that 91% of its staff and, on average, more than 80% of its patients are vaccinated against COVID-19 and that six people have been hospitalized, two of whom have been released from isolation .

At the start of the pandemic, nursing homes were ravaged by COVID-19. A retirement home in Washington was the first major epidemic in the country. Now, a recent study shows that there were 592,629 cases and 118,335 deaths in nursing homes at the end of 2020 alone.

Follow Keira Wingate on Twitter: @KeiraRenee



The Community Health Care Program is also studying the social determinants of health to help improve the well-being of residents: Rutgers-Camden Campus News


Instructor Rebecca Bryan with students Christina Neal and Anastasia Dudzinski at the Salvation Army Kroc Center vaccination center

By Jeanne Léong

Rutgers University ‒ Camden students provide COVID-19 vaccines and health services to Camden residents while studying the social determinants of health to find solutions to help improve health care for city dwellers.

According to the United States Census Bureau, 1 in 10 people live in poverty and many people cannot afford basic necessities such as healthy food, health care, and shelter.

For many residents of Camden, social inequalities, systemic racism and poverty affect their health and their access to health care.

“When nursing students understand the root causes of social determinants of health and the impact of these determinants such as lack of access to care, unstable housing, food insecurity, unsafe neighborhoods and the lack of reliable transport, they can take better care of the health of patients. care and wellness priorities, ”says Donna Nickitas, Dean of the Rutgers School of Nursing ‒ Camden.

Thanks to a grant from the New Jersey COVID-19 Service Corps (NJCSC), Rutgers ‒ Camden is participating in a project with Montclair State University to bring together emerging public health and allied health professions to provide support to communities as part of the national AmeriCorps program.

Donna Nickitas, Dean of the Rutgers School of Nursing – Camden

Donna Nickitas, Dean of the Rutgers School of Nursing – Camden

Based at the Rutgers Health Center ‒ Camden in Centerville branches, eight students from the Rutgers School of Nursing ‒ Camden will provide vaccine training, administer vaccines and study how social issues such as poverty, unemployment and lack of childcare affects residents’ ability to lead healthy lives and access health services.

“I hope we can begin to address the glaring inequalities that have contributed to the pandemic’s disproportionate impact on this community,” said Rebecca Bryan, director of community engagement and professional development, student supervisor and instructor. program clinic. .

During the seven-month program from September to April, students will receive credit for 300 clinical hours, receive a stipend of $ 2,665 for living expenses, and receive a scholarship of $ 1,343 that can be used for cover the cost of future training or to pay off federal student loans.

During the 2020-21 academic year, participants from Rutgers ‒ Camden AmeriCorps provided community health care in the town of Camden by providing clinical monitoring, education, and vaccinations to residents of the Salvation Army Vaccination Center. Kroc Center, pop-up clinics, schools, and the City of Camden Housing Authority.


Polish protesters warn looming health crisis


WARSAW, Poland – When a priest arrives at a hospital in Chorzow to perform the last rites, nurse Mariusz Strug can see fear in the eyes of dying patients. “After the sacrament, they knew what was going on,” he said.

But there were no psychologists available to offer any solace to the patients. Strug and another nurse would try to offer kind words, but they were stretched to the limit to treat 60 patients in their COVID-19 ward.

“People come to us and they want us nurses to perform a miracle,” Strug said.

After a year and a half of the pandemic, and as Poland stands on the cusp of a fourth wave of COVID-19 infections, nurses, doctors, ambulance drivers and other health workers are came to urge Prime Minister Mateusz Morawiecki and other authorities to make far-reaching reforms of the health system, arguing that it risks collapsing.

“The pandemic has shown us how bad the health system is,” said Gilbert Kolbe, nurse and spokesperson for the protest movement. “This is the last chance to do something before it’s too late. We will not be able to avoid a crisis in five, ten years.

While healthcare workers in the European Union in 27 countries have been tested by the pandemic, Poland has faced this test with fewer doctors and nurses than most. According to OECD statistics, Poland has the lowest number of practicing doctors in relation to its population: only 2.4 to 1,000 inhabitants compared to 4.5 in Germany. Poland also has only 5 nurses per 1,000 inhabitants, which is lower than the EU average of 8 and well below richer countries like Germany, which has 14.

The Polish healthcare sector has been strapped for resources for decades, a situation that has not been rectified by a series of governments on the left, center or now right.

The problems were exacerbated by the thousands of doctors, nurses and others who left Poland for better paid work in Western Europe after the country joined the EU in 2004.

Among the healthcare professionals who remained in Poland, many also left the public sector for higher-paying jobs in the private sector, leaving less to care for the poorest people, said Kolbe, a 25-year-old. who left a public hospital. work for a private medical company but hopes to return to the public system one day.

Kolbe said that an average of 5,500 people complete their nursing education each year in Poland, but only around 2,500 go to work in the public system.

Some of those who protest say they are simply exhausted. With low wages, some work more than one medical job to support themselves.

Alicja Krakowiecka, a 56-year-old nurse from the southern city of Czestochowa, said her hospital was so understaffed that at the height of the pandemic she sometimes started her day at 6 a.m. only to be invited to stay because that the night nurse was ill. She was then left alone with 30 patients for a 24 hour shift. Instead of taking two days off, he would be asked to come back the next evening.

” You refuse ? She asked, explaining that she was okay with the exhausting changes out of a sense of obligation.

The protest began on September 11, when tens of thousands of people from all over Poland marched through Warsaw. Some stayed in tents and held daily press conferences and lectures.

Protesters were deeply moved last weekend when a 94-year-old man who came to give them candy killed himself a few feet away. A gunshot rang out at a press conference and medics ran towards the man, but could not help him.

Since then, they have protested silently, waiving press conferences.

Amid the pressure of protests and talks between health unions and the government that last for weeks, Morawiecki announced on Tuesday that an additional billion zlotys ($ 254 million) would be allocated this year for wages and salaries. education in the health sector.

In addition, Health Minister Adam Niedzielski said on Wednesday that he had agreed to pay paramedics more.

Still, the group that organized the protests said the rest of the healthcare community was not happy, meaning more talks between the government and the protesters are on the way.

Kamila Maslowska, a medical student, stopped in protest tents with friends on Tuesday to show her solidarity.

“I am fluent in two more languages ​​besides Polish so I think I could find a job abroad,” she said, “(But) I wouldn’t like to leave. thing is changing for the better.

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AARP Monthly Report Shows Wisconsin COVID Nursing Home Death Takes Five-Fold

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MILWAUKEE (CBS 58) – Thursday’s recall developments come as there is new data regarding people living in nursing homes. The AARP monthly COVID database shows Wisconsin nursing home deaths increased five times since the previous month’s report.

Wisconsin now averages about 11 nursing home deaths each day. And the AARP dashboard showed cases among staff members were on the rise, and the percentage of Wisconsin facilities with a staff shortage is almost double the national rate.

Jim Flaherty, associate state director of communications for AARP, said: “If you’re not on top of making sure these residents have what they need and that they have vaccines, things can. get very ugly, very quickly. “

The latest information from the AARP shows five deaths in nursing homes per 10,000 residents. Last month there was only one death. Now there is growing concern as AARP officials have reiterated how quickly a COVID outbreak can impact a collective care setting.

Flaherty said, “Someone can come off the street to visit a loved one and bang, it blows up in a nursing home. Any kind of community setting, not just a nursing home.”

Flaherty says he hopes everyone is careful because the vulnerable nursing home population can often be overlooked. So far, 22% of all COVID-related deaths have occurred in nursing homes. But he says some positive news is that 62.4% of health workers are vaccinated and 86.5% of residents are fully vaccinated.

However, another concern is the industry-wide staffing shortage: more than 44% of Wisconsin establishments are understaffed, nearly double the national rate. Mike Pochowski, president and CEO of the Wisconsin Assisted Living Association, said, “The caregiver crisis, or the workforce crisis, is possibly the worst it has ever been. We have great difficulty recruiting and retaining staff to work at our facilities statewide. “

And when staff shortages impact care, nursing homes and assisted living facilities across the state are affected. Rick Abrams, President and CEO of WHCA / WiCAL, said, “We have facilities in the state that are closing to admissions. individual.”

Abrams says hospital patients are starting to back down as they cannot be accepted into nursing homes where they would normally be referred. He says at least 53 patients in the La Crosse area have nowhere to go right now.

But there is some optimism as facilities improve to cope with and contain outbreaks. Flaherty said: “All we can do is take the necessary precautions to make people as safe as possible. Because we don’t know what the next variant will be.”

Abrams called the labor crisis in the industry a full-fledged pandemic, but said facilities are improving a lot to isolate outbreaks when they do occur.


15 deaths among nursing home patients moved to warehouse

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NEW ORLEANS (AP) – Death toll dropped from seven to 15 among nursing home residents evacuated before Hurricane Ida to a warehouse where conditions were deemed too squalid for safety, the state’s health department said Thursday.

However, a department statement noted that some fatalities may be unrelated to the storm or conditions in the warehouse.

“Over time and given the health conditions that required a level of nursing home care, unfortunately the number of deaths among this group is likely to increase,” he said. “This is why it is important to distinguish between the total number of deaths from any cause and the number of storm-related deaths.”

The number coroners have classified as linked to the storm remains at five, Department of Health spokesman Kevin Litten said in an email. He said coroners were investigating others.

John McLindon, attorney for Bob Dean, who owns seven nursing homes evacuated to the warehouse, said he was confident Dean would be cleared.

“There is no evidence that the evacuation caused or contributed to any of these deaths,” he said.

The health department said 843 people were brought to the warehouse in Independence City, and more than 50 of them had to be hospitalized afterwards.

Authorities said the warehouse reeked of urine and feces, with some people lying in dirty clothes, without food, on mattresses on the floor. Garbage was piled on the ground, there was water in the building and the generators broke at least temporarily, state officials said.

McLindon said he would appeal the ministry’s dismissal Dean’s Nursing Home Licenses and Medicaid Provider Agreements by the Oct. 6 deadline.

The first five deaths were all in people in palliative care, he said. “When you are in hospice care, you are at the end of your life,” McLindon said.

The Times-Picayune / The New Orleans Advocate first reported the to augment in deaths.

The state attorney general has opened a criminal investigation and state health officials are investigating the deaths.

Dean told media that, given their age and frailty, two or three people in his home die each day under normal circumstances.

Dean faces at least five lawsuits from nursing home residents and their families, the newspaper reported.


COVID-19 cases at LA County skilled nursing facilities decline, public health reports

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Reflecting the general trend in Los Angeles County, the number of COVID-19 cases among staff and residents of skilled nursing facilities increased from early July to mid-August and began to decline in recent weeks. .

“The drop in cases in skilled nursing facilities is good news and reflects the high vaccination coverage in these facilities as well as the strict infection control measures,” said Dr Barbara Ferrer, director of the public health department of the LA County. “We continue to prioritize and support skilled nursing facilities with third doses for immunocompromised residents and we stand ready to scale up these efforts once recalls are approved. The decline in cases and deaths in nursing homes is an important reminder of the power of vaccines to prevent serious illness and death from COVID-19. “

During the week ending August 8, 123 cases were reported among residents and staff of skilled nursing facilities. For the week ending September 12, 55 people tested positive for COVID-19 at skilled nursing facilities: 20 new cases were among residents of skilled nursing facilities and 35 new cases among skilled staff at facilities nursing. In the past three weeks, an average of 65 new cases have been reported among staff and residents of skilled nursing facilities.

Currently, 88% of residents and 90% of staff in skilled nursing facilities are fully immunized. Qualified nursing facilities are subject to strict infection control precautions and are also required to check the immunization status of all workers and perform routine tests on staff and residents. By September 30, healthcare workers, including staff in skilled nursing facilities, must be fully immunized against COVID-19.

Public health confirmed 41 new deaths and 1,750 new cases of COVID-19 on Wednesday, and identified 1,448,065 positive COVID-19 cases in all areas of LA County and a total of 25,911 deaths.

There are 1,018 people with COVID-19 currently hospitalized and 31% of those people are in intensive care.

At the Henry Mayo Newhall Hospital in Santa Clarita, the number of inpatients increased by 31% after several weeks of declining trend.

“We went from 22 inpatients to 29 in less than a week,” Moody said. “We continue to strongly encourage everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated. “

Vaccination is the best way to stay out of the hospital, according to the CDC, said Henry Mayo officials.

As of Wednesday, September 22, 34,035 cumulative cases have been reported in the Santa Clarita Valley since March 2020, according to public health. These cases include:

  • 26,021 in the city of Santa Clarita * (+55)
  • 62 in the unincorporated areas of Bouquet Canyon
  • 1,110 in Canyon Country unincorporated areas
  • 4 338 in Castaic * (+8)
  • 70 in the unincorporated areas of Newhall
  • 4 in the Placerita canyon
  • 18 in San Francisquito / Canyon du bouquet
  • 22 in Unincorporated Sand Canyon
  • 161 in unincorporated areas of Saugus (+1)
  • 47 in the unincorporated areas of Saugus / Canyon Country
  • 1,615 at Stevenson Ranch (+6)
  • 414 in unincorporated areas of Val Verde
  • 264 in unincorporated areas of Valencia

* As of Monday, September 20, public health officials have recorded 2,182 cumulative cases at the Peter J. Pitchess Detention Center, including 1,577 at the North County Correctional Facility. These cases are split between the city of Santa Clarita and Castaic totals.

Public Health encourages all eligible people to be vaccinated. Anyone 12 years and older living or working in LA County can get the COVID-19 vaccine. Many vaccination sites across the county, including all county-run sites, also offer third doses of the vaccine to eligible immunocompromised people. Vaccinations are always free and open to eligible residents and workers, regardless of their immigration status.

To find out how to make a vaccination appointment, what checks you will need to present during your vaccination appointment and much more, visit the LA County Immunization Website (English) or Vacunate Los Angeles site (Spanish).

Vaccinations are always free and open to eligible residents and workers, regardless of their immigration status.

See all coronavirus coverage: Coronavirus Coverage – COVID-19 Map

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Sask. Heart and brain specialists prepare as healthcare slowdown worsens amid COVID-19 outbreak


The long list of types of medical care currently on hold across Saskatchewan includes home care, diabetes rehabilitation and counseling, but also major brain and heart procedures.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority has provided a general list of surgeries and other care delayed or canceled as COVID-19 patients, mostly unvaccinated, fill hospitals and intensive care units across the province.

It comes as COVID-19 cases continue to rise, with 426 new cases in the province announced on Wednesday, 54 more than those reported the day before. The number of hospitals also set a new record for the fourth day in a row on Wednesday.

Specialists interviewed this week, including a neurologist and a cardiologist, provided details of the changes for their patients. These include all “coiling” operations to prevent high risk patients from suffering from a brain aneurysm. In another example, all cardiologists were ordered Wednesday to cancel half of all cardiac stress tests, angiograms and diagnostic procedures.

“We are frustrated, tired, scared,” said Regina cardiologist Dr. Andrea Lavoie.

Lavoie and Saskatoon stroke neurologist Dr. Brett Graham said anyone in an emergency will always receive the same care as usual. They say anyone with urgent concerns or changes in their condition shouldn’t hesitate to call 911.

Indefinite wait

But the non-urgent needs of hundreds if not thousands of others across the province will have to wait indefinitely. Heart disease and stroke are two of the leading causes of death in Saskatchewan. Much of delayed care is designed to prevent or identify major problems, but that is not possible at this time.

“We feel for our patients. They can feel abandoned,” Graham said.

Graham said the COVID-19 outbreak has also affected where patients are staying. The most critical still have beds in hospitals in Saskatoon and Regina, but others are now being told to stay in Yorkton or North Battleford or other smaller centers. Still others, normally admitted to hospital, are under the supervision of home care staff.

The Saskatchewan Health Authority also said Wednesday that adult patients with COVID are occupying beds at Jim Pattison Children’s Hospital.

Lavoie and Graham said healthcare staff are working tirelessly to provide the best possible care for all patients.

But Lavoie said there was also frustration and sadness, because none of this was supposed to happen.

For weeks, medical professionals, academics, scientists, statistical modeling experts, city leaders and many more have pointed to evidence of a fourth wave driven by the more virulent delta variant of the coronavirus. The Saskatchewan Medical Association, the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses and the government’s own medical officers of health have asked for indoor mask warrants and passports for vaccines.

Anti-mask and anti-vaccine locals have rallied on several occasions to assert what they saw as their individual rights and freedoms. Premier Scott Moe and Health Minister Paul Merriman urged residents to act safely, but rejected calls for more government rules.

Dr Brett Graham, a stroke neurologist in Saskatoon, says anyone with a health emergency will still receive care, but dozens of their patients’ elective procedures and surgeries will be delayed or canceled due to the COVID-19. (Jason Warick / CBC)

At the end of last week, as the number of hospitals and intensive care units hit record highs and Alberta announced a slew of new restrictions, Moe issued the public health orders requested by experts.

Lavoie, Graham and others predict that things could get worse over the next few weeks until the new measures take effect.

“It was really demoralizing for healthcare workers knowing that we are about to see what we are, and that there was a way to avoid it,” Lavoie said.

No one from the Saskatchewan Health Authority was available for an interview.

But according to a list provided by the authority, here are some of the canceled or delayed health care needs:

  • Primary care – diabetes education, health counselors, chronic disease management.
  • Home care – education, therapy, foot care, wound care, nursing support.
  • Population and public health – dental health programs, health promotion, sexual health clinics.
  • Rehabilitation services.
  • Cardioscience and Neuroscience – outpatient clinics, including heart function and stroke prevention clinics, stress testing, lung function lab.
  • Outpatient services for mother and child – Women’s health center, outpatient pediatric consultations.
  • Geriatric services, including respite care.
  • Dermatology services.
  • Outpatient care – eye center, minor surgeries, cystoscopy, endoscopy.

An official with the Saskatchewan Health Authority said in the email that this list could be expanded or changed as needed. The official said all cancer cases, both emerging and urgent, will be given the typical high priority.


CMS Takes Another ‘Hit’ From COVID Vaccination Transparency In Nursing Facilities

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The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (“CMS”) announcement a new tool on the CMS comparison website to enable consumers to access the vaccination rates of staff and residents of each nursing facility and make informed decisions when choosing a nursing facility. CMS has asked certified healthcare facilities to report weekly COVID-19 vaccination data since May and can use that data to feed into the new transparency tool. As a result, the new transparency tool does not add new requirements to nursing facilities, although mandates to vaccinate nursing facility staff may be forthcoming under new emergency federal regulations.

Although vaccination rates are currently available on the CMS COVID-19 data from nursing homes website, the information is isolated from the COVID-19 data and is not user-friendly. Inclusion of vaccination rates on the Compare website will allow consumers to view vaccination data, as well as other data points, including information on fire safety, penalties, staffing levels, and more. , offering a more complete picture of the care establishment.

CMS’s reporting of immunization data to the CMS Compare website is another administration response to low immunization rates among nursing home workers. These efforts were previously discussed with new rules require nursing facilities to educate and offer COVID-19 vaccine to residents, clients and staff, and report weekly COVID-19 immunization data for residents and staff, and will soon be covered in more detail with a new condition of participation fully vaccinate workers. The collection and presentation of large national data sets, in a user-friendly format, is an ongoing federal effort to encourage quality-based competition in the healthcare industry.

This is also a measure taken by CMS to increase transparency of vaccination rates, as requested by US Senate.


COVID outbreak at skilled Oahu nursing home amid worker shortage adds stress to facility

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HONOLULU (KHON2) – The Hawaii Nurses Association has sounded the alarm about low staffing levels in skilled nursing homes. The union president said members were overworked as at least one facility battled a COVID outbreak.

At least 54 residents and 25 staff at the Care Center of Honolulu have tested positive for COVID-19.

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“We don’t have the details of the origins of this particular outbreak, but it is a significant outbreak,” said Healthcare Association of Hawaii president and CEO Hilton Raethel. “And certainly one of the biggest outbreaks we’ve seen at any of our facilities in some time.”

A spokesperson working with the Care Center of Honolulu confirmed that the source of the coronavirus infection was traced to a patient who had been transferred to the facility.

The Care Center of Honolulu shared a statement with KHON2 News.

Like a number of nursing homes in the state, the Delta variant resulted in an outbreak of COVID in September at our facility. While 91% of our staff are vaccinated, 54 patients have tested positive, the majority of which have been vaccinated. On average, more than 80% of our patients are vaccinated.

After learning of the existence of our first infected resident, we immediately tested residents and staff at the facility and took steps to isolate infected residents and put protocols in place to protect staff and residents. We test residents and staff more often than necessary, and we are grateful to have been commended by the state Department of Health for our handling of this outbreak.

Every member of the staff at the Care Center of Honolulu has made an extraordinary effort to provide the highest standards of care to our patients. We have nothing but praise for our nurses, who, like their counterparts around the world, are meeting the challenges posed by the pandemic in heroic fashion.

We regret that our high regard for our nurses has been called into question by false statements made by the Nursing Association of Hawaii. No nurses have been suspended and we continue to work collaboratively with our nurses to manage patient care and schedules.

We agree with the Hawaii Nursing Association that there is a shortage of nurses in long-term care facilities that has become even more acute during the pandemic. We also enlisted the help of the Healthcare Association of Hawaii. Our elected officials in Washington and others in the state health department are trying to find solutions to this problem facing all long-term care facilities and the health care system in general.

Honolulu Health Center

Hawaii Nurses Association president Daniel Ross said members were working longer hours to fill in worker gaps. He said that in one case a nurse was working an 8-hour shift.

Ross said, “We advised them, listen, it’s not patient abandonment if you tell them you’re not safe, that you’re not fit to work. It comes to a point, you cannot work continuously while being able to do your job safely. “

Raethel said a proposal to bring in more than 240 additional healthcare workers at a cost of $ 10 million had not received state approval. He presented the $ 10 million proposal to strengthen post-acute care facilities to members of the Hawaii House of Representatives in early September.

In the meantime, he said the institution’s attempts to bring in more staff through recruiting agencies have also been unsuccessful.

Find more COVID-19 news: cases, vaccinations on our Coronavirus News page

“The facility went to a number of agencies to try to identify staff,” Raethel said. “And there were staff who were available, but didn’t want to go into a facility that is experiencing an epidemic, which also presents an additional set of challenges.”


Judge extends ban on enforcement of state vaccine mandate in healthcare


A northern judge extended the temporary ban on the state’s ability to enforce immunization mandates for healthcare workers seeking religious exemptions, although this may not be not the reprieve that some employees are hoping for.

Employers can still seek to exercise their own mandates in the interim, legal experts have said, and determine whether to grant or deny religious exemptions on an individual basis.

In a case filed in court earlier this week, Judge David N. Hurd of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of New York in Utica postponed – in part because of COVID concerns – a September 28 hearing in the part of a lawsuit against the governor’s office and the Ministry of Health filed by 17 anonymous health professionals

Hurd also extended a temporary restraining order on the state’s ability to enforce his mandate until October 12. One of the main goals is the tenure rule that religious objections to vaccination cannot be taken into account by health care employers.

According to the mandate, by Monday, September 27, workers in hospitals, nursing homes and other health care facilities must have at least one dose of one of the three vaccines.

Despite the judge’s ruling, unvaccinated healthcare workers can still be fired if their religious objections are not considered “sincere or genuine,” labor lawyer Jessica Baquet said.

“Let’s say the plaintiffs win whatever they ask for,” said Baquet, chairman of the labor and employment law group at Jaspan Schlesinger in Garden City. “All of this then means that employers will have to revisit religious exemptions as they normally would.” This process, she said, may find that an employee’s religious objection claims are not sincerely founded – for example, an employee claiming that vaccines contain material objectionable to their religion might be asked to ‘he takes common medications that contain the same material.

While employers under normal employment law are required to consider requests for exemptions based on religion, they are only required to make a good faith effort to accommodate employees whose objections are deemed legitimate.

“The argument I expect the state to make is that allowing unvaccinated employees into healthcare will pose a direct threat to the safety of the employee or others. people in the workplace, ”said Domenique Camacho Moran, labor and employment lawyer at Farrell Fritz in Uniondale.

Northwell Health, the state’s largest health care system, based in New Hyde Park, “is currently reviewing several hundred requests for religious exemptions,” spokeswoman Barbara Osborn said in a statement. “Our review process will comply with applicable law which provides guidance on how to handle such requests.”

Osborn stressed that the northern state judge’s order does not prevent the warrant from coming into effect on Monday. It only prevents the state from banning religious exemptions.

“We are currently reviewing the judge’s order to understand our obligations and any potential operational implications and determine how to most effectively adjust our processes to accommodate this ruling,” she said.

A nurse aide at an Amityville nursing home said the tenure of healthcare workers is unfair after everything healthcare workers have been through for the past 18 months.

“If we don’t choose to get the shot, they fire us,” said Marilyn Welch, 57, of Wyandanch. ““ I’m a true believer in what I stand for, ”Welch said.“ My gut tells me not to take it. “

She is considering filing a religious objection on the grounds that the vaccine contains fetal cells. None of the vaccines contain fetal cells, although the Johnson & Johnson vaccine was developed using clones of cell lines created decades ago from fetal tissue, according to the City of Health Department of Health. New York.

Pope Francis urged Catholics to get vaccinated, and some Catholic dioceses, including the Rockville Center Diocese, have advised parishioners to take the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines instead of Johnson & Johnson.

In another development on the mandate front on Wednesday, Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Laurence L. Love sided with city officials against unions and removed a temporary restraining order preventing the Department of Education to move forward with its city-wide vaccine mandate on teachers and other audiences. school staff.

With David Olson


New online tool provides nursing home vaccination and safety data

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Medicare.gov Care Compare Tool Online.

WASHINGTON, DC (WTAJ) – Medicare on Wednesday released a new online tool to compare COVID-19 vaccination rates between nursing homes.

The “Compare treatments”Feature on Medicare.gov aims to respond to complaints from consumer groups and lawmakers that critical data regarding nursing home quality and safety issues is too hard to find.

U.S. Senate Committee on Aging Chairman Bob Casey (D-PA) was among lawmakers who called for improving access to COVID-19 vaccine data in nursing homes by making it available residents, workers and families of nursing homes.

“Patients, families and workers deserve transparent and timely data on vaccination rates in nursing homes,” said Senator Casey. “I commend the Biden administration for making the data on the COVID-19 vaccine available to nursing home residents and their families, which will help them make more informed decisions about their care and enable nursing home workers to better assess the safety of their work. . COVID-19 has devastated nursing homes, and I hope this important transparency measure will help make this important part of the healthcare system a safer place to receive care and work. “

Nursing home residents have been greatly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic, accounting for more than 150,000 deaths in the United States. Nationally, about 84% of residents are now vaccinated, which has slowed the spread of the delta variant in frail patients.

Medicare officials say they are encouraged that although the delta variant has spread across the country, outbreaks in nursing homes are not getting out of hand as they did last year. last. They attribute this to the high rate of residents who have been vaccinated.

Those looking to find and compare data in our region can visit medicare.gov.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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COVID-19 cases among skilled nursing facilities decline

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Along with the general trend in Los Angeles County, the number of COVID-19 cases among staff and residents of skilled nursing facilities increased from early July to mid-August and began to decline in recent years. weeks.

During the week ending August 8, 123 cases were reported among residents and staff of skilled nursing facilities. For the week ending September 12, 55 people tested positive for COVID-19 at skilled nursing facilities: 20 new cases were among residents of skilled nursing facilities and 35 new cases among skilled staff at facilities nursing. In the past three weeks, an average of 65 new cases have been reported among staff and residents of skilled nursing facilities.

Currently, 88% of residents and 90% of staff in skilled nursing facilities are fully immunized. Qualified nursing facilities are subject to strict infection control precautions and are also required to check the immunization status of all workers and perform routine tests on staff and residents. By September 30, healthcare workers, including staff in skilled nursing facilities, must be fully immunized against COVID-19.

Public Health confirms 41 new deaths and 1,750 new cases of COVID-19. Of the 41 new deaths reported today, nine people who died were over 80, 12 people who died were between 65 and 79, nine people who died were between 50 and 64 and six people who died were between 30 and 49. Five deaths have been reported by the city of Long Beach. To date, public health has identified 1,448,065 positive cases of COVID-19 in all areas of LA County and a total of 25,911 deaths.
There are 1,018 people with COVID-19 currently hospitalized and 31% of those people are in intensive care. Test results are available for nearly 8,510,000 people, including 16% of those who test positive. Today’s test positivity rate is 1.7%.

Thursday, September 23 at 6 p.m., Public Health will organize a virtual town hall on COVID-19. Join City Hall for the latest updates on COVID-19 and information on booster doses. The town hall will be webcast live on Twitter, Facebook and YouTube @lapublichealth. For more information and to ask a question, visit: TinyURL.com/LACOVIDTownHall
“We wish healing and peace to families and friends who mourn a loved one who has passed away from COVID-19,” said Barbara Ferrer, PhD, MPH, MEd, director of public health. “The decline in cases in skilled nursing facilities is good news and reflects the high vaccination coverage in these facilities as well as the strict infection control measures. We continue to prioritize and support skilled nursing facilities with third doses for immunocompromised residents and stand ready to step up these efforts once recalls are approved. The decline in cases and deaths in nursing homes is an important reminder of the power of vaccines to prevent serious illness and death from COVID-19. “

LA County continues to offer vaccines at many different sites across the county to make it as easy as possible for eligible LA County residents to get vaccinated. Many vaccination sites across the county, including all county-run sites, also offer third doses of the vaccine to eligible immunocompromised people. Vaccinations are always free and open to eligible residents and workers, regardless of their immigration status.

Anyone 12 years and older living or working in LA County can get the COVID-19 vaccine. To find a vaccination site near you, schedule vaccination site appointments, and more, visit: www.VaccinateLACounty.com (English) and www.VacunateLosAngeles.com (Spanish). If you don’t have internet access, can’t use a computer, or if you’re over 65, you can call 1-833-540-0473 for help finding an appointment, connect to free transportation to and from an immunization site, or schedule a home visit if you are homebound.

COVID-19 Industry Protocols, Best Practices, COVID-19 Vaccine Dashboard, COVID-19 Interactive Monitoring Dashboard, Recovery Dashboard, and additional steps you can take to protect yourself, your family and community are on the public health website, www.publichealth.lacounty.gov.

Submitted by Public Health


Letter: Good health care should be everyone’s right | Opinion


To the Editor – Everyone in this community has the right to health care. Telling someone that they will not get treatment if they are not vaccinated is the worst discrimination I have ever encountered.

When the ability to work, pay bills or educate children is compromised if they are not immunized, it is not a warrant but an ultimatum. When we receive ultimatums, we tend to resist.

More continuing education and scientific testing and studies are needed. Compassion and patience are the two most difficult qualities for many people to master, but both are needed these days.

Let’s not forget the elephant in the room, or should I say Yakima Valley. Greed and poor administration choices at Astria Health crippled our valley to a large hospital providing adequate health care.

I pray daily for the wonderful providers and nurses who still work for Astria Health. I pray that a worthy organization of this community will come to the Yakima Valley. Bless us with another hospital to provide health care to my friends, former patients, children and grandchildren … if they choose to stay in this wonderful valley that we call home.


Covid-19 and skilled nursing facilities: Miller report of September 21 • The Mendocino Voice | Mendocino County, CAThe Mendocino Voice

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Editor’s Note: Dr. William Miller, Chief of Staff at Adventist Health Mendocino Coast Hospital, writes weekly reports regarding the COVID-19 situation on the Mendocino Coast. We are happy to bring his health column to life, with details on the medical fight against the pandemic. The opinions shared in this weekly column are those of the author, Dr. William Miller, and do not necessarily represent those of The Mendocino Voice or Adventist Health..

Sherwood Oaks is a local, private nursing home in Fort. Bragg. As the only qualified nursing facility here on the Mendocino Coast, it is licensed for 79 beds and currently has 45 residents. He experienced a COVID outbreak in July and August of last year. Unfortunately, he is currently experiencing another epidemic. For about two weeks, 3 staff and 4 residents have been affected. They all did well and are now isolated, which has again introduced the virus to the nursing home population. The establishment immediately began to take the necessary measures to limit the spread. As of this writing, there are 15 new active cases among residents and two new cases among staff, bringing the total for this outbreak to 24 residents and staff to date. Last year, the outbreak ended at a total of 32 with 24 residents and 8 staff infected. There were 8 deaths as a result of the outbreak last year.

There are now significant differences compared to last year. On the positive side, all but five of 45 residents (89%) and 85% of staff are now fully immunized. Remember that vaccination does not prevent a person from becoming infected and therefore becoming positive, but it does go a long way in reducing the risk that a person will develop into serious illness. So we expect that we won’t see people getting so sick this time around. So far, none of those infected appear to be seriously ill.

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The high vaccination rate in Sherwood Oaks compares quite favorably with national statistics and is a credit to the management of Sherwood Oaks. According to the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), the average vaccination rate in skilled nursing facilities in the United States is 84% ​​of residents and 64% of staff.

In contrast, the nursing home staffing problems are worse than before. This is essential because each of these new COVID cases must be isolated and it increases the need for staff that the facility simply does not have at this time. Last year, the hospital was able to step in to help by accepting COVID-positive residents of Sherwood Oaks, relieving staff stress and helping to limit additional exposures at the facility. Now, however, our county’s three hospitals are at full capacity due to the increasing number of COVID cases in the county and are themselves experiencing a staff shortage.

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To solve this problem, there has been good collaboration between the administration of Sherwood Oaks, the management of the hospital, the county health officer and officials of the California Emergency Medical Services Authority (EMSA). Our frequent meetings have included Dr Dave Duncan, the medical director of EMSA. As a result, EMSA has sent 6 nurses (RNs and LVN) and 4 nurse aides (CNA) to Sherwood Oaks for the next 4-6 weeks to help with the staff crisis. This support allowed Sherwood Oaks to avoid the unwanted alternative, which would have been to start transferring residents to other nursing homes. Considering that most northern California nursing homes themselves are understaffed and full, that would have meant sending residents to central and southern California.

EMSA also dispatched a mobile team to visit COVID hotspots across the state to assist with the administration of the monoclonal antibody, Regen-COV, which has been shown to reduce the risk of progression to hospitalization (see the Miller report of September 6e for more information on this treatment). As of this writing, 12 of the residents have received it.

It appears that a crisis like the one we experienced last year can be avoided thanks to state-provided support staff and the high vaccination rate among residents. Great appreciation is given to the State EMSA team for their help. However, this highlights several critical challenges we face locally for our healthcare system and nursing homes. The most important of these is the lack of staff.

Even before COVID, there was a nationwide shortage of healthcare workers. This shortage affects all areas, from nurses to highly qualified personnel such as laboratory and radiology technicians, to support personnel such as housekeepers, to primary care physicians and specialists. Rural communities are particularly affected by these shortages. We’ll look at this national and local dilemma in more detail in next week’s Miller report, along with specific information about local healthcare vacancies and how to apply.

America’s nursing homes have struggled for nearly two decades with what can best be described as a perfect storm. As baby boomers age and therefore need more health services including long term care in nursing homes. Payments to nursing homes by Medicare, MediCal and private insurance have steadily declined while at the same time the cost of doing business has increased. This has led to a reduction in the beds available in nursing homes just when we need more to accommodate an increasing number of elderly people. The design of almost all SNFs in the United States tends to promote overcrowding. The Miller Report for the week of October 5e will take a more in-depth look at these nursing home issues nationwide and discuss how this affects the future of local facilities like Sherwood Oaks.

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Finally, it will be an interesting test of the effectiveness of vaccines in reducing progression to serious disease since so many cases here have been fully vaccinated.

You can access previous Miller reports by visiting www.WMillerMD.com.

The opinions shared in this weekly column are those of the author, Dr. William Miller, and do not necessarily represent those of the publisher or Adventist Health.

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The new CMS tool makes it possible to compare the vaccination rates of retirement homes by establishment

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In an effort to make it easier to track and research nursing home immunization data, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) this week launched a new tool to compare immunization rates at any facility funded by the country’s federal government.

Found at Medicare.govThe Care Compare feature, the new tool uses data reported by nursing homes to the National Healthcare Safety Network of the Centers for Disease Control.

It includes information on the percentage of residents and staff who have been vaccinated at a personal nursing home, as well as state and national rates. It can be used to compare a qualified nursing facility to others based on proximity and their overall rating.

Medicare and Medicaid certified nursing homes have been required to report COVID-19 immunization data for residents and staff on a weekly basis since May, which is posted on the CMS COVID-19 nursing home data website.

Immunization rates continue to vary widely from state to state and facility to facility, with the national percentage of residents vaccinated now at 84.1%, according to CMS. A significant gap remains between nursing home staff and resident vaccination rates with 63.7% of staff vaccinated per facility nationwide. Staff are now vaccinated nationally.

“CMS wants to give nursing home residents, their families and caregivers the information they need to choose the care providers for their loved ones,” CMS administrator Chiquita Brooks-LaSure said in the statement. hurry.

“CMS knows that nursing home staff want to protect their residents and calls on them to get vaccinated now,” she added.

The Biden administration announced on Aug. 18 that all nursing home staff must be vaccinated against COVID-19 or risk losing Medicare and Medicaid funding, but after outcry from nursing home operators that they felt “distinguished”, the mandate has since expanded to include any supplier.

This includes hospitals, home care agencies, outpatient surgery facilities, and dialysis centers, among others.

While some operators, such as Genesis HealthCare and PruittHealth, have chosen to require vaccines for their staff before Biden’s decision, many have not.

Recall shots from September 20, extending federal reimbursement to states for eligible costs of COVID-19 emergency response and mobilizing National Guard personnel were Other aspects of Biden’s plan.

CMS is developing an interim final rule on the warrant to be issued in October and expects certified facilities to comply with the new requirements.


Idaho allocates $ 10 million to hospitals, clinics and care facilities

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Idaho is allocating an additional $ 10 million in relief to hospitals, primary and emergency care clinics, and skilled nursing facilities amid rising numbers of COVID-19 patients requiring care. Governor Brad Little made the announcement Tuesday morning.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare activated Statewide Crisis Care Standards (CSCs) last week due to increased patient numbers. Although it is activated statewide, hospitals will implement it according to their needs and according to their own policies.

Not all hospitals will move to this standard of care, if they manage under their current circumstances, they can continue to do so.

“We have taken many steps to preserve access to health care during the pandemic, and this latest round of support will help ease the burden on our hospitals and our health heroes at this time,” the governor said. Little.

Little and the State of Idaho led the following resources, according to a press release:

  • New funds to establish three new monoclonal antibody treatment facilities in Idaho. There are 32 Idaho hospitals offering monoclonal antibodies in Idaho.
  • By mobilizing the National Guard, deploying a military medical response team to northern Idaho and contracting with the federal government, up to 370 additional people have been added to help hospitals.
  • Total of $ 7 million to hospitals to help alleviate staffing shortages.
  • Total of $ 4.5 million for primary care and emergency care entities that play an important role in preventing people from getting so sick that they need treatment in hospital.
  • Total of $ 8.5 million to preserve hospital capacity by increasing hospital discharges to qualified nursing facilities for COVID-19 positive patients.
  • Temporary license fees have again been removed for retired or inactive nurses so that they can activate their licenses and re-enter the workforce more easily.
  • $ 30 million to expand COVID-19 testing in Idaho K-12 schools to minimize virus transmission.

The Idaho Department of Health and Welfare is holding a press conference on COVID-19 in Idaho at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday. Click here to watch the briefing.



Dr Michael Sisk and Amy Hitshew, PA-C join SageWest Health Care


Provide orthopedic care services to residents of Fremont County

Fremont County, Wyo. (September 21, 2021) –SageWest Health Care is pleased to announce that Michael Sisk, MD and Amy Hitshew, PA-C have joined their staff and will provide orthopedic care services. These providers continue to develop health services in Fremont County and surrounding areas.

“We are delighted to welcome Dr Sisk and Amy to SageWest Health Care,” said John Ferrelli, CEO of SageWest Health Care. “High quality orthopedic and surgical services are important to our community, and the expertise of these providers is important as we strive to meet the changing healthcare needs of our region.

Dr Sisk has over 20 years of orthopedic care. He recently joined SageWest after leaving the Steamboat Orthopedic and Spine Institute where he has practiced since 1999. He completed his residency at the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center and obtained his medical degree from the University of Colorado School of Medicine in Aurora, Colorado. Dr. Sisk is certified by the American Board of Orthopedic Surgery.

Hitshew has over 25 years of clinical experience. She completed her medical assistant training at the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks, North Dakota, and received her Bachelor of Science in Nursing from University of Wyoming at Laramie, Wyo.

Dr Sisk and Amy specialize in sports medicine, foot and ankle trauma and reconstruction, joint replacement and personalized knee replacement.

To make an appointment, call Steamboat Orthopedic and Spine Institute at 307.206.9300.


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Dems push to revamp health care programs | News, Sports, Jobs


WASHINGTON (AP) – Dental care for the elderly with health insurance. The end of the rock bottom prices on prescription drugs. New options for long-term home care. Coverage for low-income people excluded from Medicaid by ideological battles.

These are just a few of the changes in healthcare that Democrats want to make with the huge “Build back better” plan. The $ 3.5 trillion national agenda bill touches almost every aspect of American life, from taxes to climate change, but the components of health care are a cornerstone for Democrats, amplified during the COVID-19 crisis.

For the nearly 145 million Americans covered by government health programs, as well as their families and communities, investing in the nation’s services could make a difference in quality of life for decades.

“It’s a holistic look at how health care can be not only expanded, but better oriented towards the real needs of people.” Kathleen Sebelius, Federal Health Secretary to President Barack Obama, said about Bill Biden. “You have a plan that really targets the serious gaps in health care that keep people uninsured or running out of money for their treatments. “

But Democrats can only be successful if they bridge the divides between them. Don’t look for Republicans to help you.

With Medicare’s long-term finances under a cloud, Republicans say now is not the time to add new benefits. They plan to oppose not only the healthcare provisions but the entire Biden package, voting against him as too big, expensive and a slide towards “socialism.”

Conscious of the politics to come, Democrats are pulling the package together with their weak grip on Congress. Instead of launching new experiments that many progressives prefer, they have chosen to invest more resources in existing programs, from Medicare and Medicaid enacted during the Great Society to the Affordable Care Act of the Obama era.

It’s sort of a compromise, led by Biden’s approach, paid for by taxes on corporations and the wealthy, those who earn more than $ 400,000, as well as savings on prescription drug prices paid. by the government to pharmaceutical companies.

“I have said many times before: I believe we are at an inflection point in this country – one of those times when the decisions we are about to make can change – literally change – the trajectory of our nation. for years and maybe decades to come ”, Biden said in remarks last week at the White House.

Polls have shown that key healthcare provisions appeal to voters of all political lines. Many Republican voters, for example, generally approve of Medicare negotiating the prices of prescription drugs, even if GOP lawmakers do not. While Obama’s health law was primarily aimed at helping uninsured working-age people and their families, Biden’s coda emphasizes the elderly, who are also reliable voters in mid-election. mandate.

The main healthcare provisions in the mix include:

–Allow Medicare to negotiate the prices of the most expensive drugs, including insulin. Private insurers and employer plans could then access these lower prices. Annual increases in the prices of established drugs would be limited. Elderly reimbursable expenses would be capped.

A RAND Corporation study finds that such an approach could cut U.S. spending on major drugs in half.

Strong opposition from large pharmaceutical companies and major industrial groups has left Democrats divided over the structure of the program.

Four House Democrats opposed the measure in committee votes last week, enough to derail the entire bill. In the past, they had argued to give Medicare the power to negotiate, but they are voicing a series of concerns about the scope of House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s plan. The Senate could take a somewhat different approach.

Medicare’s bargaining power is the keystone of all healthcare as expected savings would be used to deliver new benefits.

–Expand medicare to cover dental care, vision and hearing aids for the elderly. This provision, championed by Senator Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., Has been a long time coming. Vision care would start at the end of next year and hearing aids in 2023, but in an apparent cost cut, dental coverage would not begin until 2028.

–Based on Obama’s health care law. The idea is to provide health insurance to more than 2 million low-income people in GOP-led states that have rejected Medicaid’s expansion of “Obamacare.” The workaround is a major demand for health equity for black lawmakers, as many of those caught in the coverage gap are minorities in the southern states.

Biden’s plan also calls for making health insurance more affordable for people who buy their own policies by increasing subsidies for Obama’s health law. The richest subsidies are temporarily provided in Biden’s COVID-19 relief bill to people who do not have employer coverage, and the White House wants to make the subsidies permanent. Lawmakers may only be able to meet the president halfway.

–Promote a shift to long-term care in the patient’s home as opposed to care facilities, which have turned into incubators for the coronavirus as the pandemic spreads. Biden had wanted $ 400 billion for this initiative as part of Medicaid, but it appears Congress will give him about half of it.

– Permanently fund the politically popular children’s health insurance program so that it does not face recurring votes in Congress that could disrupt services.

–Improve maternal health by providing postpartum coverage for 12 months through Medicaid.

With key centrist Democrats, including the senses. Joe Manchin of West Virginia and Kyrsten Sinema of Arizona, saying the overall price of $ 3.5 trillion is too high, Democrats are looking for ways to cut costs, either by cutting some programs or, more likely, by shaving. some cost or duration of what has been proposed.

Other Democrats, however, have warned that a thinner package could disappoint voters who sent them to Washington on their promises to make big changes.

“My constituents expect me to deliver, and I pledge to do so,” said Rep. Lauren Underwood, D-Ill., whose professional background is in healthcare policy.

Biden’s approval rating plunged following the chaotic and violent consequences of the United States’ exit from Afghanistan and the resurgence of the coronavirus at home after proclaiming the pandemic was on the wane, and as Democrats in Congress are gearing up for next year’s midterm elections.

Democratic pollster Celinda Lake said the healthcare provisions in the budget bill appeal to lawmakers’ own instincts for self-preservation. The proposals resonate with older voters and women, two key groups in the 2022 contests, with Democrats battling to retain the House.

“If you want to protect yourself in your neighborhood, you have to double the health care provisions”, she said.

Copyright 2021 The Associated Press.

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About 1 in 5 nursing home staff refuse COVID vaccine before term of office

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ALBANY – Nearly one in five nursing home staff still refuse to be vaccinated against COVID-19 despite the state’s mandate to get a first injection by September 27 in institutions that house frail elderly residents most vulnerable to the fatal disease.

Despite the tenure, 18% still refuse to be vaccinated, according to the state’s health department, as unwavering resistance from employees persists even with the threat of potential disciplinary action, including dismissal by employers.

The order issued by the state’s health department on August 16 requires all long-term care and hospital workers to be vaccinated and also allows employers to fire those who refuse the order.

As of Monday, just 82% of all senior care workers in the Empire State’s 613 homes had received one or two injections – worrying nursing home operators that if they couldn’t fill the gap. gap and achieve immunization levels of 100%, some homes will. see labor shortages.

Brooklyn has the lowest staff immunization rate among the five boroughs, at 77%, but some New York City homes have numbers well below that, according to the DOH.

For example:

  • At the Schulman & Schachne Nursing Home in Brooklyn, 49.9% of staff received at least one injection and 46.4% received one or both injections to complete their series.
  • 65.3% of staff received at least one dose at Brooklyn-Queens Nursing Home, Brooklyn, and 55.7% completed their vaccination series.
  • At the Buena Vida Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in Brooklyn, 59.8% had at least one jab and 58.5% finished their streak with one or two hits.
  • Hopkins Center for Rehab and Health Care, Brooklyn, 60.1% of workers received at least one and 56.4% completed their streak.
  • At the Saint Joachim & Ann Nursing Home in Brooklyn, 56% of staff received at least one injection and 51.6% were fully immunized.

However, the mandate appears to have prompted some workers to get vaccinated, as the vaccination rate has improved since the rule was announced in mid-August.

Staff immunization levels jumped 5% statewide between August 15 and September 5, from 70.1% to 75.5% combined at partial and full rate, according to DOH data.

This number increased another 5% between September 5 and 15, reaching 80% in total.

“[The DOH] set an unrealistic goal, given the distance they had to travel and the reluctance of these people to be shot. Based on these figures, it appears that the pace of vaccinations has accelerated significantly over the past two weeks. That still leaves 18% of the nursing home workforce to receive their first injections in just a week, ”Bill Hammond, Empire Center for Public Policy principal investigator, told The Post. health.

“This is a group that has been very hesitant so far, and changing their minds could be a challenge. Unless the state relaxes its mandate – or the courts suspend it – nursing home operators are right to worry about the danger of staff shortages. “

Nursing home staff were among the first to receive the lifesaving shot last December – as more than 15,000 residents have died since March 2020 from the coronavirus – but facility administrators and 1,199 SEIU, the union representing the majority of workers, had problems convincing hesitant individuals.

In many facilities, the vaccination rate of residents has been much higher than that of the workers caring for them.

Steve Hanse, president and CEO of the New York State Association of Healthcare Facilities, which represents nursing homes and other long-term care facilities, said the ultimate goal was to d ‘reach 100%, but that the DOH should be more flexible, as is the state policy governing school employees.

“If we don’t have a 100% immunization rate and, as a result, employees are forced to quit their jobs amid a long-term care workforce crisis, the plan B should be to allow, at least temporarily, a regular COVID-19 testing option for healthcare workers, similar to what the state has allowed for teachers, ”he said.

Jim Clyne, who runs LeadingAge NY, which represents nonprofit seniors’ residences, noted that some homes have immunization numbers well below the state average and also favor the testing option.

“For establishments that have real staffing issues, I think it would be wise to have a time-limited testing option for establishments that are struggling to maintain staff,” he said.

“It allows some of the reluctant people to get vaccinated more time and it would give the facilities more time to perhaps recruit and have access to staff who are willing to get vaccinated.” The reality is that if you have a building full of people in need of care, you have to find a way to provide [that] take care of them, ”he added.

Currently, 89 percent of state residents have started or completed their immunization series.

“As we have said before, the Department is aware of the potential staffing issues. However, our overriding goal is the protection of patients and residents in our healthcare facilities, ”said Jeffery Hammond, DOH spokesperson.

“That’s why everyone who is medically fit should be vaccinated, especially healthcare workers who interact with and care for our most vulnerable New Yorkers at risk. The Department will listen to all contributions that help advance the goal of protecting patients, visitors, the public and healthcare workers. ”


COVID-19 spreads through Baie Verte nursing home, as NL reports 15 new cases

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Anyone who has visited White Bay Retirement Living in Baie Verte since September 7 is advised to get tested. (Paul Daly / CBC)

Residents of a Baie Verte retirement home are grappling with a COVID-19 outbreak as the province added 15 new cases to its tally on Monday.

Ten of the new cases were identified at White Bay Retirement Living in Baie Verte, according to a press release from the Department of Health. All residents and staff have been tested and asked to quarantine themselves as investigators try to determine how the virus entered the facility, the department said.

In a tweet, Central Health said it offers community testing in Baie Verte and advises anyone who has visited the house since September 7 to get tested. No appointment is necessary, according to the health authority.

There are a total of 11 new cases in the Central Health Region. One case is a contact of already known cases, while 10 are under investigation.

In the Central Health Region, one case is a woman under 40, one case is a woman in her 40s, one case is a woman in her 50s, six are women aged 70 and over and two are men 70 years and over.

Four of the new cases are located in the Eastern health region. All four are linked to national or international travel.

One case is a woman under 20, one is a man in his twenties, one is a woman in his forties and one is a man in his fifties.

The province has reported seven new recoveries since the last COVID-19 update. There are currently 46 active cases, with one person hospitalized.

The ministry says it continues to monitor two COVID-19 clusters in Newfoundland and Labrador. There are 21 confirmed cases linked to a cluster in the Labrador-Grenfell region as contact tracing continues.

An investigation into a cluster in the Western Health Region is also continuing on Monday, with eight confirmed cases linked to the cluster.

The sources of the two clusters remain under study.

Residents of personal care homes isolate themselves

Dr Monika Dutt, chief medical officer of the central health region, said it was not yet clear how the outbreak in White Bay Retirement Living began.

She said public health is currently focused on limiting the spread inside the home, but investigators are also trying to determine a source.

“It’s part of what we’re looking at right now, and if we’re able to do that, then that information would be shared,” she said in an interview with CBC News.

Dutt said residents who have tested positive for COVID-19 are isolating themselves and infection control measures have been put in place to ensure they always receive the services and care they need.

She said Central Health first got a feel for the outbreak on Saturday and took the weekend to complete testing at the facility before announcing the outbreak.

Dutt encouraged anyone who has visited the house since September 7, or anyone with even mild symptoms, to get tested.

Central Health chief medical officer Dr Monika Dutt says some of the 10 cases linked to White Bay Retirement Living are residents. (Jing Kao-Beserve)

There aren’t many close contacts yet, Dutt said, but she doesn’t know how many people will show up for testing.

Dutt did not say how many of the 10 cases linked to the house are residents – although she did confirm that at least some are – and she did not disclose the immunization status of those who tested positive.

No one linked to the outbreak is currently hospitalized due to COVID-19.

Meanwhile, Eastern Health lifted visitor restrictions on September 9 at the Caribou Veterans Memorial Pavilion in St. John’s.

Northern Peninsula back to alert level 2

Communities in the eastern part of the Northern Peninsula will return to Alert Level 2 from 12:01 am Tuesday, according to the provincial health ministry. The area moved to Alert Level 3 earlier in September as a cluster of cases began to grow.

The move includes Roddickton, Englee, Conche, Croque, St. Julien’s and Main Brook.

It also includes the communities along Route 432, from the intersection of Route 432 and Route 433 and north to the northern limit of the town of Main Brook, routes 433, 434 and 438.

“This change in alert level occurs on the basis of the public health investigation to date and the epidemiology in the region,” reads a press release from the Ministry of Health issued shortly before 16 h 30 Monday.

“Although a source has not yet been determined, the risk to the public is considered low.”

To date, 289,370 tests have been administered in the province, up 3,045 from Friday.

According to the provincial government’s COVID-19 website, nearly 79% of the province’s eligible population received two doses of the vaccine, while 87% received at least one.

The update comes after the provincial government said it would soon be implementing a vaccine passport, as well as the reinstatement of the mask’s mandate, which went into effect on Saturday.

Read more about CBC Newfoundland and Labrador



Nation’s Largest Responsible Healthcare Organization, Physician-Led Healthcare Achieves CMS 100% Quality Rating | Business


DALLAS – (BUSINESS WIRE) – Sep 20, 2021–

Steward Health Care, through its subsidiary Steward National Care Network, ranked # 1 in membership, tied for # 1 in quality, and had the second highest shared savings payment on 513 participants in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (CMS) of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Service (CMS). (MSSP), according to recently released CMS data. As the largest physician-led healthcare network and Responsible Care Organization (ACO), Steward generated over $ 68 million in total Medicare savings in 2020 while achieving a Perfect Quality Score of 100. % amid the challenges of the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Since the launch of Steward’s Medicare Accountable Care Organization in 2012, it has grown to become the largest in the country, with over 161,000 program beneficiaries, while maintaining a multi-year track record of success in achieving high quality clinical outcomes. and the generation of constant savings. Steward’s Medicare ACO results are part of his broad portfolio of value-based successes through risk-based commercial, Medicare Advantage and Medicaid contracts in all states where Steward operates.

Despite significant market headwinds related to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, Steward’s 2020 performance year has been the most successful – which can be attributed to his physician-led, compassionate and focused model of care. on the patient. This model of care has been proven to reduce costs while dramatically increasing the quality of care and patient satisfaction in communities across the country.

“We are proud of our physicians and their clinical teams who participate in the MSSP program through our network, who have provided the highest quality care while aiming to keep their patients healthy in the communities where they live,” said Sanjay Shetty, MD, President of Steward North America. “This significant designation confirms that our physician-driven, patient-centered model consistently delivers best-in-class outcomes for all stakeholders, including patients, payers and communities. “

“Our comprehensive care management programs support newly hospitalized chronic disease patients with resources and programs in their communities and are integral to our success and Medicare ACO mission of putting patients first in everything. we do “said Dr Joseph Weinstein, Chief Medical Officer of the Steward Health Care Network. “The COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose many challenges, but our unwavering commitment to providing high quality, value-based care in all the communities we call home is and will remain the central tenet of our work. “

About Steward Health Care

Steward Health Care’s physician-led business model was designed to unlock access to the highest quality care at a sustainable cost, committing to providing personalized and ongoing medical services that positively impact the patient’s health. the physical, emotional and mental well-being of patients.

Founded in 2010, Steward Health Care is the world’s largest physician-led healthcare network with more than 5,500 providers and 43,000 healthcare professionals caring for 12.3 million patients per year through its global network of ‘hospitals, emergency care centers, skilled nursing and behavioral health facilities. services.

Based in Dallas, Steward currently operates 44 hospitals worldwide, including 34 in Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, Louisiana, Massachusetts, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Texas and Utah, as well as five internationally in Malta and Colombia.

See the source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20210920005736/en/

CONTACT: Jérémy Tunis

Telephone: (469) 341-8894 | E-mail: jeremy.tunis@steward.org

KEYWORD: TEXAS UNITED STATES NORTH AMERICA

INDUSTRY KEYWORD: HEALTH INFECTIOUS HPITAL DISEASES PRACTICE MANAGEMENT MANAGED CARE GENERAL HEALTH

SOURCE: Health Care Steward

Copyright Business Wire 2021.

PUB: 20/09/2021 12:24 / DISC: 20/09/2021 12:24

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Copyright Business Wire 2021.


Pilot program set to bring childcare services to Sydney Nursing Home

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A Sydney nursing home is expected to soon offer an on-site daycare with an early morning drop-off and lunchtime visits with the children.

The program is slated for the Cove Guest Home later this year. Details have not been finalized.

“We are reviewing the financial data right now,” said Dr. Kevin Orrell, Deputy Minister and CEO of the Office of Healthcare Professional Recruitment.

“It has been approved in principle to proceed with the costing and hiring of the appropriate people. I hope that if it’s as positive as it initially seems … that [we] will transfer the project into a type of permanent arrangement for these workers. “

Dr. Kevin Orrell is Deputy Minister and CEO of the Healthcare Professional Recruitment Office. (Brian MacKay / CBC)

The objective of the project is to attract more people to the profession of continuing care assistant. Orrell did not specify the costs for parents who will use the program.

Seniors can have a role to play

The new office is reviewing daycare regulations to ensure the Cove Guest Home meets its requirements.

Orrell said the program will also seek to share time with seniors and children.

He said there might be an opportunity “for some of the residents to get involved, perhaps as storytellers or as people who could contribute to the well-being of the child, who will be looked at will be the one of the questions we’re “going to have to ask this pilot.”

Approximately 10 to 12 spaces are available to accommodate long-term care workers at the Sydney facility.

Shortage of workers to cover shifts

Cheryl Deveaux, chief executive of The Cove, said the pandemic has made it difficult to find people to cover shifts, resulting in vacations being canceled.

A child care program for continuing care assistants at Cove Guest Home Sydney is under development. (Erin Pottie / CBC)

“People are turning away from health care and choosing another employer that doesn’t require overtime, that allows them to take time off work when they want to be away from work,” said Deveaux, who works at home for 18 years. .

“It’s really difficult to recruit and replace people who are also leaving the workforce. “

Childcare difficult to find

Deveaux said the lack of child care is also linked to changing family dynamics, with many children having both parents or single parents working outside the home.

Cheryl Deveaux is the CEO and Director of Cove Guest Home in Sydney, Nova Scotia. (Erin Pottie / CBC)

She said finding affordable child care is a problem for her staff due to their early morning start time.

“There are a lot of obstacles,” she said. “So that’s something that I hope this pilot project will show everyone that we really need to focus on child care in Nova Scotia.”

Deveaux said she hopes the daycare program will be rolled out to long-term and short-term care facilities across the province.


‘On hold by a thread’: Nursing home industry warns of staff exodus over vaccination warrants | Coronavirus Updates

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JEFFERSON CITY, Missouri – A federal mandate requiring nursing home staff to be vaccinated against COVID-19 could exacerbate an already severe worker shortage, an industry advocate of Missouri lawmakers warned last week.

Nikki Strong, executive director of the Missouri Health Care Association, told members of a Missouri House subcommittee on Tuesday that she didn’t believe the federal mandate was the best way to get more household workers vaccinated. nursing.

“We have to have healthcare workers, and we’re dangling by a thread right now,” Strong said.

Missouri lags behind all but two states – Florida and Louisiana – in the number of staff at its nursing homes who have received a COVID-19 vaccine. On average, 50.2% of nursing home staff are vaccinated in the state even though they were, along with residents, among the first Americans to be eligible for the vaccine last winter.

Residents of Missouri nursing homes have more enthusiastically embraced the COVID-19 vaccine to regain their freedom after many nursing homes instituted strict lockdowns to control the spread. About 84% of Missouri nursing home residents have been vaccinated.

Tuesday’s committee hearing was billed as a discussion of an upcoming mandate from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services that nursing home staff should be vaccinated. CMS has yet to publish the rules.

But despite weeks of increasing COVID-19 cases in Missouri nursing homes, much of the discussion has centered on whether the vaccine’s mandate would keep nursing home staff away. and how Missouri might respond. Missouri Department of Health and Seniors’ Services staff told committee members there was likely no way around the warrant.

Rep. Dirk Deaton, a Christmas Republican who chairs the subcommittee, said he believes it is important that workers around the elderly get vaccinated. But he said having a shortage of healthcare workers was the only thing worse than having unvaccinated ones.

“That’s what I’m afraid of. I hope it doesn’t come to that, and I hope we don’t see it, but I would feel really bad if we crossed that bridge and that happened and nobody ever said anything ”, a- he declared.

COVID-19 on the rise again

COVID-19 cases have been increasing in Missouri nursing homes since June.

In the week ending Aug. 29, Missouri nursing homes reported 153 infections among staff and 121 infections among residents, according to home data reported to CMS. That was a drop from early August, when weekly staff infections topped 200 for the first time since January, while the vaccine was still being rolled out.

During the virus’s peak over the winter, nursing home residents have overtaken staff in COVID-19 infections. Infections for both groups fell sharply in February after the vaccine arrived.

But now it’s the employees who are falling ill, according to CMS data.

Rep. Peter Merideth, a Democrat from St. Louis, said he was frustrated with the discussion because demanding that healthcare workers be vaccinated seemed “common sense.”

Merideth noted that nursing home residents had no choice but to be near the staff members caring for them, which means they don’t have as much of a say on their level of risk exposure to someone who decides to eat in a restaurant.

Strong said she wanted residents to be safe, but homes need caregivers.

“We had facilities begging their staff not to leave under the threat of an order,” Strong said.

Merideth replied, “Well, frankly you begged them to leave even without any conversation about the vaccines, right?” “

He said the nursing home understaffing crisis is the product of hard work and low wages, and committee members should work on how to fix this without making the homes less safe.

Lenny Jones, state director of SEIU Healthcare Missouri, a union representing healthcare workers, supported the vaccine’s mandate in a statement released at the start of the subcommittee meeting.

“Urgent action is needed to increase vaccination rates in Missouri with new variants threatening to prolong this ongoing crisis,” Jones said.

“Literally the least” that we can do

The settlement was also good news for AARP Missouri. The branch’s parent organization urged that vaccinations be mandatory for residents and nursing home staff.

“Getting the vaccine is literally the least a person working in a nursing home can do to protect the people they care for,” Jay Hardenbrook, director of advocacy for AARP Missouri, said last month.

CMS is also expected to issue a mandate to vaccinate nurses and healthcare workers in hospitals.

Asked earlier on Tuesday about the vaccination mandates for nurses and healthcare workers in hospitals and whether taking a vaccine is a personal choice, Donald Kauerauf, the new director of the Department of Health and Elderly Services, said said vaccinations would stop the spread of the virus and taking a vaccine was a personal decision throughout the process.

He said he was concerned about the effects the rule might have on staff at those facilities, but stressed that federal regulations had yet to be drafted by CMS.

“We’re not even at that point yet. Sometimes I’m a little hesitant to go too fast in decisions based on rumors, ”Kauerauf said. “Let’s wait and see what the law says. We are not yet near that point.


Special session on possible shortage of healthcare workers


FRANKFORT, Ky. – Kentucky lawmakers may soon be called for another special session. This time around, it would aim to quell the state’s shortage of healthcare workers.


What would you like to know

  • Kentucky lawmakers could be called for another special session soon
  • Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer says Governor Andy Beshear may recall lawmakers to Frankfurt to address state health worker shortage
  • The session would likely only last a day, Thayer said
  • Kentucky National Guard members sent to state hospitals to help staff deal with COVID-19 outbreak

Senate Majority Leader Damon Thayer (R-Grant) said this weekend that Gov. Andy Beshear (D) may soon recall lawmakers to Frankfurt to address staff shortages in nursing homes and hospitals. The session would be limited in scope and likely only last a day.

Senate Speaker Robert Stivers (R-Manchester) made similar comments over the weekend. Thayer said a plan would give the state $ 81 million in federal funding to attract and retain healthcare workers.

In recent weeks, hundreds of members of the Kentucky National Guard have been dispatched to Commonwealth hospitals to help hospital staff deal with rising COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations. The more than 300 members of the Guard are helping 21 hospitals with non-clinical functions free up staff to focus on patient care, Beshear said last week.

“It shows that every hospital is packed, that they are in desperate need of help, and that we are a state full of people more desperately ill than ever,” Beshear said. “I think this is the largest deployment of the Guard in this health crisis situation in our history.”

In a week-long special session convened earlier this month, lawmakers refined the rules on masks in Kentucky. The Republican supermajority voted to remove all statewide mask mandates, including one passed by the Kentucky Board of Education. After the special session, 96% of Kentucky school districts voted to keep their mask rules.

According to the latest data from the Kentucky Department for Public Health, 2,426 Kentuckians are hospitalized with COVID-19. Eight of the state’s 10 hospital regions have an intensive care capacity greater than 90%.


Related stories




Minnesota nursing home whistleblower alleges officials asked staff to ignore COVID-19 guidelines

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Whistleblower Alleges Executives at the Minnesota St. Therese of New Hope Nursing Home have asked staff to ignore COVID-19 health regulations, according to a September 15 statement item in the Star Tribune.

Brooke Peoples, who previously worked as an administrator at the New Hope, Minnesota facility, alleges in lawsuit that “senior executives at the 258-bed nursing home told employees to ‘ignore and violate’ guidelines state and federal government visits and quarantine of newly admitted patients, even after more than 60 people who lived in the facility died from the coronavirus. She alleges that leaders in Sainte-Thérèse took a “lax approach to the lethal potential of the pandemic” and asked staff to ignore guidelines from the state Department of Health, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Peoples lawyer Lori Peterson said one such violation occurred when “a relative of one of the directors of Sainte-Thérèse” was “admitted to the nursing home from a hospital without following federal quarantine guidelines ”. This action, said Peterson, “potentially exposed residents and staff to infection.” In addition, Peoples alleges “that a lack of communication between the leaders of Sainte-Thérèse delayed the deployment of new infection control measures”.

According to the lawsuit, Peoples claims that “she was fired less than a month after warning her superiors that the nursing home was putting patients and staff at risk.” The article indicates that a general manager of Sainte-Thérèse fired Peoples “then falsely said that his dismissal was due to a loss of confidence in his capacities of leadership”. Peoples alleges that his dismissal is in violation of the Minnesota Whistleblower Act. She also says the reasons given for her dismissal “are contradicted by a series of laudatory job performance reviews she has received since she started working at the retirement home in 2017”. The trial contains excerpts from these performance reviews.

With the lawsuit, Peoples “asks a judge to order Sainte-Thérèse to reimburse her for lost wages and other losses linked to her dismissal.”

The Star Tribune The article details how nursing homes in Minnesota have been severely affected throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. “Since the start of the pandemic, 4,597 residents of long-term care communities have died from COVID-19 – accounting for 58% of all deaths from the virus in Minnesota, state records show. According to the article, in the fall of 2020, “some facilities became so overwhelmed that they contacted the Minnesota National Guard for emergency personnel assistance.”

The Star Tribune reports that in May 2020, “Nearly 50 residents de Sainte-Thérèse died of COVID-19 … Last week, the nursing home recorded 313 infections and 84 resident deaths from the virus – the second deadliest toll among long-term care facilities in the State, according to a database of the state health department. “

Sainte-Thérèse also has a history of health and safety violations, the article points out. The institution has been cited eleven times in a control 2018 “For a variety of health and quality of life standards”. Saint Teresa was quoted ten times in February Control 2020 for more violations “including failure to adhere to handwashing, glove use and other hygiene protocols, which could potentially affect more than 50 residents, staff and visitors,” according to the ‘inspection. However, the article notes that since the fall of 2020, Sainte-Thérèse “has maintained a strong infection control record,” according to recordings.

Read it Star Tribune article here.

Read more news on COVID-19 whistleblowers on WNN.


Why won’t some healthcare workers get the COVID-19 vaccine? : NPR


Nurse Katrina Philpot (left) protests against COVID-19 vaccination and mask warrants in Santa Fe, NM, in August.

Cedar Attanasio / AP


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Cedar Attanasio / AP


Nurse Katrina Philpot (left) protests against COVID-19 vaccination and mask warrants in Santa Fe, NM, in August.

Cedar Attanasio / AP

As new data shows that one in 500 Americans have died from COVID-19, and the delta variant continues to rise across the country, the next challenge many health officials face lies within their own. Staff: The 27% of U.S. healthcare workers who were not vaccinated against the disease in July, according to a study by the COVID States Project.

On top of that, other research shows that since the vaccine first became available to healthcare workers in December 2020, the vaccination rate among nurses and nursing aides has been lower than that of doctors. . This can be of particular concern, as nurses and orderlies have frequent and close contact with patients.

Data shows that health workers received the COVID-19 vaccine at a higher rate than the general population: 73% versus 64% of non-health workers. And many can assume that people who work in the healthcare industry are more enthusiastic about the vaccine and less fearful.

But that has its limits, says David Lazer of Northeastern University, the lead researcher of the COVID States Project report. The attitudes of health workers towards the COVID-19 vaccine essentially mirror the rest of the country – with those who live in rural areas, who are Republicans, with less education and income more likely to be resistant to the vaccine.

“The big takeaway for us is that healthcare workers are like everyone else,” Lazer told NPR.

“The same things that predict vaccine resistance or reluctance among the general population are also predicted among healthcare workers,” he says.

Disinformation also affects healthcare workers

Melody Butler, a nurse at Long Island Community Hospital in New York City and executive director of the nonprofit Nurses Who Vaccinate, says she has heard nurses across the country explain why they don’t want the vaccine.

Among the reasons: The research was done too quickly; it has not been fully approved by the FDA; they already have antibodies from working on the front lines of the pandemic or perhaps already catching the virus. Many are concerned about how the vaccine affects fertility.

To be clear, all of these concerns have been addressed by scientific experts and the overwhelming evidence is that COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective.


Protesters hold placards during a protest against COVID-19 warrants in New York City on September 13. The attitudes of healthcare workers about getting the COVID-19 vaccine have largely mirrored data from the general population, researchers found.

Bloomberg / Bloomberg via Getty Images


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Bloomberg / Bloomberg via Getty Images


Protesters hold placards during a protest against COVID-19 warrants in New York City on September 13. The attitudes of healthcare workers about getting the COVID-19 vaccine have largely mirrored data from the general population, researchers found.

Bloomberg / Bloomberg via Getty Images

But Butler points out that widespread disinformation plays a role here as well. And nurses don’t learn the ins and outs of vaccine research. The immunization gap between doctors and nurses, she says, boils down to an education gap.

“When these new illnesses emerge, it’s really up to nurses to educate themselves about the research,” Butler said. “You had nurses floundering around, looking for information. So now we see this educational gap.”

“We are seeing nurses who weren’t trained to recognize poorly written studies, they weren’t trained to recognize anti-vaccine propaganda,” she said. “And that’s very compelling. That’s what our struggle is in the nursing community.”

Butler says her concern with getting nurses across the country vaccinated is that she wants them to be safe and protected. The best way for health officials to get their colleagues vaccinated against COVID-19, she says, is to function in a place of compassion.

They need workplaces that “speak to people with compassion and kindness,” she says. “Knowing that the person talking to you wants you to get the vaccine not because it’s the law, but because they care.”

Vaccination warrants could push more staff out

While a majority of nurses are vaccinated and more than half support workplace vaccination mandates, some oppose demands to be vaccinated or undergo mandatory testing and say they would rather quit their jobs. And hospitals are already feeling the effects.

A New York hospital announced he would no longer be able to give birth because dozens of staff quit rather than be vaccinated. In Houston, 153 hospital workers quit or were fired during a recent vaccination tenure. It’s a crisis on top of the widespread nursing shortage that has been a problem since even before the pandemic.

Some hospital executives – like Alan Levine, CEO of Johnson City-based Ballad Health, Tenn. – say they can’t afford to implement a vaccine mandate for their staff – about 63% of whom are already vaccinated. Enough nurses would leave, says Levine, that hospitals would not be able to take care of patients.

“We have about 6,000 nurses in our system,” he says. “If there are five or ten nurses in our system, we feel it.”

Levine says that right now all intensive care beds in the hospital system are full – at least half full with COVID-19 patients.


The McNairy Regional Hospital in Selmer, Tennessee, is just one of the rural hospitals that have closed in the state in recent years.

The Washington Post / The Washington Post via Getty Im


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The Washington Post / The Washington Post via Getty Im


The McNairy Regional Hospital in Selmer, Tennessee, is just one of the rural hospitals that have closed in the state in recent years.

The Washington Post / The Washington Post via Getty Im

Nursing shortages in the United States have long hit rural hospitals the hardest. In Tennessee, 14 rural hospitals have closed since 2012, leaving behind thousands of people in communities already struggling to find care.

Levine says he’s not yet sure what impact President Biden’s national mandate for healthcare workers’ vaccines will have on his hospitals, but he’s worried about how that will affect healthcare providers. rural health.

“I understand why the president felt the need to announce these mandates nationally, but every region of the country is different,” Levine said. “In rural areas, it’s very difficult.

“I have to keep as many nurses as possible who are able to take care of our community,” he says.


Tangipahoa Nursing Home Shelter Under Decades of Hazardous Chemicals Clean-Up Order | New

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A warehouse in Tangipahoa Parish closed after hundreds of residents were evacuated from a nursing home due to Hurricane Ida.

State environmental officials say contaminants in the site’s groundwater have been reduced to levels that pose no serious risk to health inside the warehouse, especially to occupants in short term, and issued a letter in 2015 stating that the agency had no objections to residential uses for the property.

But other experts question the wisdom of housing vulnerable people at a site with such a history, saying even brief exposure to small amounts of harmful chemicals could cause problems like breathing problems and rashes. for people who are already in poor health.

“It would be like putting a very sick person in an area that is going to make them even sicker,” said Wilma Subra, an environmental scientist who works as a technical director for the Louisiana Environmental Action Network, an advocacy group.

Hot, overcrowded and unsanitary conditions in the converted Waterbury business complex prompted state officials to revoke licenses held by Bob Dean for the seven nursing homes evacuated before Ida. Seven of the 843 people taken there died as a result of the storm and at least 50 were hospitalized.

State health inspectors found residents were neglected in the Independence Warehouse, lying in feces and urine for days, many of them on mattresses on a floor in the ‘flooded warehouse.

Now, the story of the facility and the persistent contamination of the groundwater surrounding it has become another part of one of the many lawsuits against Dean, his companies and the state Department of Health for the aborted evacuation effort.

New file claims Dean failed to fulfill his obligation under the nursing home‘s “Residents Bill of Rights” to notify his residents that they would be taken to a building where they could be exposed to products toxic chemicals. The lawsuit alleges that Dean publicly misrepresented the old Waterbury warehouse and outbuildings as an “alternative care facility”, a former “Fruit of the Loom” warehouse or a former “Febreze” factory.

“This is critical information that should have been shared with residents and their families,” said Don Massey, counsel for a plaintiff who filed the complaint. “But instead, it was hidden from them.”

http://www.nola.com

A glimpse of conditions in the under-equipped warehouse owned by Bob Dean, who evacuated seven of his retirement homes to this state-approved location during Hurricane Ida. Patients were moved from this area after the storm. So far, seven residents of these retirement homes have died and dozens more have been hospitalized.

Courtesy of WWL-TV, images from an employee and shared with a patient’s family. Sent to WWL-TV Courtesy of this patient’s family.


John McLindon, a Baton Rouge attorney representing Dean, said state agencies had no issues with the location of the shelter, citing the 2015 letter from the State Department for Environmental Quality and the Ministry of Health’s approval of the evacuation plan for the group of nurses. houses.

He added that Dean’s businesses had never received any prior complaints from the public or government agencies about the installation.

“We have no evidence that there was ever a problem with the fumes or anything like that,” he said.

State Department of the Environment records show that for more than 30 years, under Waterbury and a former owner, Cline-Buckner, the buildings were used to mix chemicals and package them in spray cans for them. perfumes and pesticides.

Some of the chemicals stored there in large quantities have been defined by federal regulations as hazardous materials, according to Waterbury’s emergency plans. The operations ended in 2011.

Hazardous chemicals included industrial solvents tetrachloroethene and methyl chloroform and the pesticide Propoxur, according to annual reports.

About a decade ago, producers voluntarily withdrew Propoxur from its use indoors and in flea collars due to its potential toxicity to humans, according to the United States Environmental Protection Agency. environment.

The groundwater contamination dates back to before 1985, when the site was managed by Cline-Buckner, according to DEQ records. Trichlorethylene and vinyl chloride have been among the pollutants cleaned up under DEQ supervision since 1987.

Trichlorethylene, an industrial solvent, is a common contaminant in groundwater and a frequent subject of long-term post-industrial clean-ups.

Probably carcinogenic, it decomposes underground to vinyl chloride, a known carcinogen. Both can vaporize from groundwater and seep upward into homes, even through cracks in concrete slabs, according to environmental regulators.

Contamination of the old Waterbury factory has triggered lawsuits in the past from neighboring landowners who have settled out of court.

The latest reports to DEQ show that the contamination continues to drop and has been removed in some places, but a few areas that are not directly under the old Waterbury buildings continue to have high levels of vinyl chloride and trichlorethylene.

Twice a day, we’ll send you the headlines of the day. Register today.

In an interview last week, Fernando Iturralde – who oversees the cleanup of underground pollution for DEQ – said it was unlikely that steam could enter buildings from still heavily contaminated areas.

In 2015, the real estate investment company that sold the property to Dean asked DEQ to green light the site for residential use, saying a company was interested in converting it into a home escape shelter. pension, according to correspondence from DEQ. DEQ geologists have issued a letter of “no objection” to this use.

After years of cleaning up, the groundwater contamination posed no risk as the levels were low enough and what was left had no way to expose people, the letter said. In addition, no one has used the shallow aquifers for drinking water, DEQ noted.

Three months after the March 2015 letter, one of Dean’s companies purchased the property for $ 918,000, according to Tangipahoa Parish land records. The Windsor Investment Group retained responsibility for groundwater monitoring and funded the purchase of the building.

DEQ’s Iturralde said it is highly unlikely that the flooding that soaked the mattresses and floors of buildings during Ida would contain pollutants from the underground contamination remaining elsewhere at the site. DEQ officials said they had never tested the interiors of buildings for fumes from underground contamination.

State health officials declined to say whether they had considered the site’s environmental history before approving Dean’s plans to temporarily house the residents there.

“While there are several ongoing investigations into this event, including our own rigorous review, I am unable to answer most of your questions at this time,” said Kevin Litten, spokesperson for the agency.

Litten also declined to say whether the health department contacted DEQ about the site. DEQ spokesman Greg Langley said there was no record of formal contact between the agencies.

Subra, the scientist with the Louisiana Environmental Action Network, said that in addition to the underground contamination, the fact that dangerous chemicals were mixed inside the facility should be of concern.

A fifth resident of a nursing home who had been moved to a warehouse in Tangipahoa parish before Hurricane Ida has died.

DEQ’s “no objection” letter did not address the risk of an indoor spill.

Reports from state health inspectors on visits made during Ida’s evacuation show residents of nursing homes were first housed in three buildings on the former Waterbury site before the floods do not force them to enter the main warehouse.

McLindon, Dean’s lawyer, noted that there had been no chemical mixing in the large warehouse where most of the residents were housed. But he admitted that some residents were, for a time, in a building that contained a chemical mixing room.

He pointed out that the chemical mixing ended 10 years ago.

Former Waterbury employees interviewed recently said the chemical mixing process sometimes produced spills. These spills, they said, were immediately cleaned up.

Measuring up to a few dozen gallons, the spills were generally too small to meet the mandate of reporting to state regulators, former employees said.

One of them, Andrew Truxillo, worked as a chemist at Waterbury from 1998 until shortly before it closed. Truxillo said it would mix batches of up to 4,000 gallons of chemicals at a time in closed tanks.

Spills were typically treated by soaking up chemicals with absorbent blankets which were then placed in hazardous waste containers, he said. Truxillo said he wouldn’t feel comfortable sleeping in the workshop given its history.

“No hell, no no hell,” he said. “You don’t know what they spilled on this floor years ago.”

Dr Ray Dorsey, professor of neurology at the University of Rochester Medical Center, said the most serious health risks from trichlorethylene – such as Parkinson’s disease and cancer – result from long-term exposure term and not short term.

But he added that the warehouse “would not be the optimal place to house displaced residents” due to the risk of inhaling fumes from residual contamination of nearby groundwater.

Subra also said she was concerned about the possibility of toxic fumes entering buildings, as well as the persistence of spilled chemicals even after being wiped up.

“It was the most inappropriate place. They should never have taken the risk,” she said.


Retirement Home Software Market to Experience Revolutionary Growth by 2026 | MatrixCare, PointClickCare, American Health Tech, OnShift

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Advance Market Analytics has released a new research publication on “Global Nursing Home Software Market Insights, to 2026” with 232 pages and enriched with self-explanatory tables and charts in presentable format. In the study, you will find new trends, drivers, restraints and evolving opportunities generated by targeting stakeholders associated with the market. Growth in the retirement home software market has been driven primarily by increased R&D spending around the world.

Some of the main players presented in the study are:

PointClickCare Corp. (Canada), MatrixCare Inc. (United States), Netsmart Technologies (United States), American Health Tech (United States), OnShift (United States), Cantata Health (United States), Promantra Inc. (United States) United States), Cliniconex (Canada), Lintech Software (United States), Inquire Solutions (United States)

Get a Free Sample Exclusive PDF Copy of This Research @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/sample-report/124552-global-nursing-home-software-market

Scope of the nursing home software report

Nursing home software is primarily used by long term care facilities and assisted living facilities to reorganize their planning, record keeping and some other administrative processes. The nursing home software is a fully integrated billing, electronic health record and business intelligence solution that enables end users to expand resident care, manage multiple tiers and maintain compliance with a single software solution . This market is primarily driven by the growing demand for software due to changing demographics of the population around the world, growing shortage of skilled nursing staff, as well as growing developments in healthcare and government initiatives. in the whole world. However, the reluctance of traditional long-term care providers to implement the software to manage their work as well as the high costs of software maintenance are some of the factors that may hamper the growth of the market.

The titled segments and subsections of the market are illuminated below:

by type (on-premises, cloud-based), application (nursing, palliative care, others), organization size (large enterprises, small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs)), subscription type (monthly subscription, subscription annual, one-time license, others), deployment (installed – Windows or Mac, SaaS, IPhone / iPad, Android), number of users (2-9, 10-49, 50-99, 100-499, 500 -999, 1000+)

Market Trend:

Quality healthcare services and solutions as well as patient safety and care
Growing adoption of smartphones and connected devices

Market factors:

High demand due to the ability to deliver high quality, fast, accurate and real-time data
Growing acceptance of health information exchange (HIE)s) and EHR systems

Market opportunities:

Growth in the use of cloud-based platforms
Government initiatives and growing adoption of mHealth and telehealth practices

The regions included are: North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Oceania, South America, Middle East and Africa

Distribution at country level: United States, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Chile, South Africa, Nigeria, Tunisia, Morocco, Germany, United Kingdom (United Kingdom), Netherlands, Spain, Italy , Belgium, Austria, Turkey, Russia, France, Poland, Israel, United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, China, Japan, Taiwan, South Korea, Singapore, India, Australia and New Zealand, etc.

If you have any questions regarding the Global Retirement Home Software Market report, please ask our [email protected] https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/enquiry-before-buy/124552-global-nursing-home-software-market

Strategic Points Covered In Table Of Contents Of Global Retirement Home Software Market:

Chapter 1: Introduction, Market Driving Product Study Objective and Research Scope of Retirement Home Software Market

Chapter 2: Exclusive Summary – Basic Information of Nursing Home Software Market.

Chapter 3: Display Market Dynamics – Drivers, Trends, Challenges and Opportunities of Nursing Home Software

Chapter 4: Overview of Factor Analysis of Nursing Home Software Market, Porters Five Forces, Supply / Value Chain, PESTEL Analysis, Market Entropy, Patent / Trademark Analysis.

Chapter 5: View by Type, End User and Region / Country 2015-2020

Chapter 6: Major Manufacturers Assessment of the Retirement Home Software Market, which includes its competitive landscape, peer group analysis, BCG matrix and company profile

Chapter 7: To assess the market by segments, by country and by manufacturers / company with revenue share and sales by key countries in these different regions (2021-2026)

Chapter 8 & 9: Viewing Appendix, Methodology and Data Source

finally, the retirement home software market is a valuable source of advice for individuals and businesses.

Read the detailed index of the full research study at @ https://www.advancemarketanalytics.com/buy-now?format=1&report=124552

Contact us:

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AMA Research & Media LLP

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5 days in wheelchair: Woman says nursing home warehouse is running out of beds

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“After they carried more people, they had no more beds, no more room on the floor. I sat there from Saturday morning until they came to pick us up on Wednesday.”

NEW IBERIA, Louisiana – For the past two weeks, Pamela Landry has been in a nursing and rehabilitation center in New Iberia.

“We have a roof over our heads, we feed ourselves, people take care of us,” Landry said.

It’s a safe haven after experiencing what she calls a nightmare.

“What we saw, what we heard and what we went through, no one should have to go through that, no one,” she said.

Landry was one of some 850 nursing home residents crammed into a warehouse in Independence during Hurricane Ida. Seven of them died.

“They packed us in there like sardines and didn’t care at all, lick at us, not at all,” she said.

Landry evacuated to the warehouse of Maison DeVille Nursing Home in Houma. She was recovering from a serious leg injury caused by a car crash in May.

“I broke my ankle, really broke my ankle,” Landry said.

Landry said the evacuation process was difficult from the start as she was never strapped into the van for the ride there.

“I roll around in the van, even with my wheelchair locked,” Landry said.

It only got worse. At the warehouse, Landry said she was not given a bed, so she sat in her wheelchair for five days straight.

“After they carried more people, they had no more beds, no more room on the floor. I sat there from Saturday morning until they came to pick us up on Wednesday, in my wheelchair, day and night. That’s where I slept day and night, in my wheelchair, “she said.

The Louisiana Department of Health closed the warehouse days after Ida and moved the hundreds of residents to shelters and nursing homes across the state. Landry was taken to New Iberia.

As of September 16, LDH said it had found permanent housing for all but 14 residents. Twelve are still hospitalized and two are in shelters for special medical needs. Landry, like many others, is hoping to eventually find a facility closer to her and her family in Thibodaux.

“At the moment, that would probably be impossible,” she said.

At least six lawsuits have been filed against Bob Dean and his retirement homes. He owned all seven people involved. They have since been closed. Landry hopes to join a lawsuit.

“We deserve to be heard. We’ve been through a lot with everyone,” she said.

LDH has made an effort to connect families with their loved ones involved, releasing the following update:

“We received 248 cumulative calls from families looking for loved ones and were able to connect 245 residents. We located the families of the remaining 3 residents but their callback numbers were not in service. For those in Louisiana looking to to connect with their loved one at Independence Evacuation, please call 211. If someone is from out of state, they should call 1-800-755-5175.


Great health divide | EKU, Anthem partner to help tackle health care disparities in rural Ky.


MADISON COUNTY, Ky. (WKYT) – We are continuing our coverage of the great health divide.

There was good news Thursday in the fight against health care disparities in rural Kentucky. Eastern Kentucky Univeristy and Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield find solutions through scholarships for students in the EKU Nursing Program.

How will this help? Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield will commit $ 92,000 in scholarships for eight nursing students, with the goal of serving rural Kentucky for three years after graduation.

According to health care researchers, about 100,000 Medicaid beneficiaries in the Commonwealth do not have sufficient access to a primary care provider. This is just a glimpse of the healthcare divide.

The eight scholarship recipients will solve the problem by providing primary care to around 4,500 Kentuckians who do not have access to health care.

We spoke with a student who will be returning to County Breathitt to help his community after graduation.

“It’s going to make me feel good because a lot of people have helped me over the years, my community, my family members, the community members and it’s really going to mean something for me to come back to be able to come back to. which was given to me by an Eastern Kentucky, ”said Allan Sloas, family practitioner nursing student.

The chairman of Anthem Medicaid said this investment was just the start. the company hopes to offer more scholarships in the future.

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Copyright 2021 WKYT. All rights reserved.


Healthcare facilities are under pressure from COVID push | Local News


Health officials say the continued rise in the number of COVID-19 patients requiring hospital care is draining resources and staff.

“We are all stretched out and our staff are stretched out,” Dr Harold Naramore of Blount Memorial Hospital said at a press briefing Wednesday morning. “It’s not just our nurses. These are our respiratory therapists, the pharmacy staff, the people who prepare the meals and the people who clean the rooms. They are all stretched.

The state’s hospital resources dashboard said on Tuesday that about 10% of the state’s hospital beds were available, with just 6% of intensive care beds. Hospitalizations in the state decreased slightly from the peak reached on September 9, with 3,831 patients with a confirmed case of COVID-19. As of Tuesday, there were 3,585 patients, including 1,071 ICU patients and 758 patients requiring ventilators.

Covenant Health reported 339 confirmed patients in its hospitals on Wednesday, with 406 confirmed or suspected cases of COVID-19. Of these, 86% were not vaccinated and 94% of intensive care patients were not vaccinated.

At Cumberland Medical Center in Crossville, there were 41 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of COVID-19 and 59 patients confirmed or suspected of having the virus. Of these patients, 88% were not vaccinated while 100% of intensive care patients were not vaccinated.

Hospital staff are being asked to work longer hours, care for more patients and not be absent.

“Almost all of these people could have jobs at higher pay rates, especially nurses, and they chose to stay here and help this community in a time of near crisis,” Naramore said.

Naramore spoke of patients on ventilators in their 30s, 40s and 50s.

“It’s very sobering. I assure you it’s real. I assure you this is happening in your community, and I assure you that we need your help, ”he said.

Dr James Shamiyeh of the University of Tennessee Medical Center said hospitals were trying to be creative with staffing and had called for National Guard help in some areas, but he said, “There is no There really is no additional staff to bring in from outside the community. There is not much we can do. As you start to see more ICU patients, sicker ICU patients, that’s why we need the community’s help so badly.

The outbreak is not only impacting patients with COVID-19, he added, but all patients requiring hospital care.

There have been incidents where patients and families have been verbally abusive of staff, Naramore said.

“Please be kind when using our services,” Naramore said. “They really don’t deserve this.”

Dr Mark Browne, of Covenant Health, said the outbreak was also having an impact on emergency services.

“It was a bit of a perfect storm,” said Browne.

As hospitals see an increase in the number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19, they have seen a dramatic increase in the number of patients presenting to the emergency room with symptoms of COVID-19. Hospitals also accommodate patients with other illnesses and injuries. In some Covenant Health facilities, emergency departments have reported nearly double the volume of patients. Patients experience longer wait times to be seen and then transferred to an upstairs bedroom – because, as Browne noted, they need to have a bed for these patients.

“It takes all of our health care systems a lot longer to get patients out of the emergency department than we would normally transfer in a relatively short period of time,” Browne said. “So we are caring for patients longer in our emergency departments, which then reinforces everything else. “

The Covenant Health Daily Dashboard reported that Cumberland Medical Center had 38 confirmed hospitalizations due to COVID-19, with 52 patients confirmed or suspected of having the virus. There were 10 intensive care patients in the hospital, with an average patient age of 54 years. The hospital reports that 84% of all COVID-19 patients are not vaccinated and 100% of intensive care patients are not.

Across Covenant’s healthcare system, 84% of all COVID-19 patients were unvaccinated and 91% of intensive care patients were not vaccinated.

Browne said the community can help close the backlog in emergency services.

If people have mild symptoms, they are advised to see emergency care centers or their primary care doctor. Additionally, hospitals are asking people looking for a COVID-19 test to find other providers in the community.

Browne told anyone with severe symptoms – such as chest pain, shortness of breath or symptoms of stroke – to seek immediate emergency treatment.

He noted that emergency departments sort patients based on their symptoms, and people who arrive after you may be seen before you.

“Be patient and be kind,” Browne added. “Our staff are extraordinarily busy. They are extraordinarily tired. They do their best every day. It is really the heroes of this circumstance that we are going through. We have people who have stepped up their efforts to work longer and longer. “

Narramore said, “None of us have a crystal ball or know how long it will last or how much it will get worse. But we can work together in our community to improve where we are at.

Pediatric cases

Dr Joe Childs of East Tennessee Children’s Hospital said there have been more pediatric cases in recent weeks at the pediatric facility, especially in patients with underlying health conditions. At the time of the press conference, there were 11 patients in the hospital including four in intensive care.

Childs warned that there is a rare complication that young patients who have had COVID-19 may experience. Called multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children, or MIS-C, the hospital treated about 35 patients during the winter wave. Symptoms can appear quickly, Childs warned. Patents and caregivers should contact their provider or go to an emergency room if children have unexplained symptoms.

ETCH provides infusions of monoclonal antibodies to patients at risk of complications. However, one of the most important things adults can do to protect young patients from COVID-19, especially children too young for the vaccines themselves, is to get the vaccine.

“The most important thing you can do in your home right now is immunize the adults around them,” Childs said.

Help with vaccines

Naramore urged everyone to get vaccinated.

“Please consider the vaccine. Please look at the science, ”he said. “The truth is, if you take the vaccine and you are fully immunized you probably won’t go to the hospital and the likelihood of you dying is almost non-existent. “

This will help hospital staff treat patients with severe illness from COVID-19 and other illnesses

The vaccines are safe and effective against COVID-19, medical providers have said, and they help prevent hospitalizations and death from the virus.

Dr Frank Beuerlein of Tennova Healthcare, said more than 1.2 billion doses of COVID-19 vaccines have been administered in the past year worldwide. Peer-reviewed studies show these vaccines to be safe, he said.

“A recent study of 6.2 million people vaccinated found that there was no significant increase in deaths or mortality compared to the unvaccinated population,” he said.

He urged people with questions about vaccines to speak to their doctors.

“The people here today have supervised 200,000 doses of vaccine in our community without any significant adverse outcome for anyone,” Beuerlein said. “We think the vaccine is very safe and very effective. We ask you to avoid disinformation on the Internet, to follow the scientific evidence. “

With a two-dose vaccination schedule, it still takes about six weeks for people to be fully immunized. In the meantime, Beuerlein urged to wear masks, avoid large crowds and wash their hands frequently.

“Ultimately, it will be the vaccine that prevents unnecessary morbidity and mortality,” he added.

While people who have had COVID-19 in the past have antibodies, Beuerlein said studies show that vaccination can double their level of immunity against future infection.

Early treatment

Monoclonal antibodies can help patients who test positive for COVID-19 develop serious illness. However, there are guidelines for this therapy, Beuerlein said.

Monoclonal antibodies are an infusion of antibodies created in the laboratory that reflect the antibodies of recovered patients. This can limit the amount of the virus in the body, he explained, and reduce the symptoms and progression of the disease.

“It’s one of the best things we have right now,” Beuerlein said.

Therapy is available for people who meet specific criteria: a positive COVID-19 test, mild to moderate symptoms, and a high risk of serious illness. This includes a long list of conditions, he said, such as underlying chronic health conditions, obesity, high blood pressure or older patients.

Beuerlein said patients interested in monoclonal antibodies should search covid19tn.gov for sites offering treatment and not go to the emergency room.

“It’s better to go to providers in our communities than to emergency rooms and wait while you have COVID,” he said.

MEDIC also accepts patients who have recovered from COVID-19 and wish to donate COVID convalescent plasma used for the treatment of inpatients.


WATCH at 11 am: Lawyers file legal action on behalf of nursing home resident “cruelly deprived of food and water”

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“Ms. Franklin was helpless, helpless and inhumanly treated by those charged with caring for her.”

BATON ROUGE, Louisiana (BRPROUD) – Barely ten days ago, more than 800 patients were found in a warehouse in the parish of Tangipahoa.

The Louisiana Department almost immediately ordered the closure of seven retirement homes.

Darlene Franklin was one of those nursing home patients who were taken out of the facility after Hurricane Ida.

On Monday, lawyers representing Darlene Franklin will file a complaint in 19th Judicial District Court on behalf of the hospice patient.

The lawyers released this statement ahead of the 11 a.m. press conference:

Lawyers from Haley & Associates, the law firm Unglesby and Dedrick A. Moore Attorneys at Law have been selected to represent Darlene Franklin. Ms Franklin, a hospice patient, was evacuated to a dirty and stuffy hot warehouse along with hundreds of other medically fragile and elderly residents of Bob Dean’s nursing home. During her days there, Ms. Franklin was cruelly deprived of food and water and forced to sit in her own feces. She was mentally and emotionally tormented by the sounds of her neighbors calling for help, but she and those around her were repeatedly denied the help they desperately needed. They were crammed into a warehouse, dumped like garbage and forced to endure the putrid smell of portable toilets overflowing with human waste as their most basic needs and medical demands were ignored. Additionally, Covid-19 precautions have been sorely ignored as already vulnerable residents have been brought closer and closer. Ms. Franklin was helpless, helpless, and inhumanely treated by those charged with caring for her.

Bob Dean and his facilities have come under scrutiny for numerous incidents including the drowning of a resident, a cocaine overdose and another found covered in fire ants. Surprisingly, two residents died during or shortly after a previous hurricane evacuation to a similar warehouse. The Federal Medicare Nursing Home Compare website shows that most of Dean’s facilities get a star in five, a rating defined as “much below average.” Nonetheless, despite its knowledge of the suffering of the residents, the Louisiana Department of Health continued to authorize it and act as a vicious slum lord for our state’s most vulnerable citizens. LDH knew Dean’s escape plans were insufficient but approved them anyway.

We are committed to achieving justice for Mrs. Franklin and all those who suffered at the hands of Bob Dean. Ron Haley is a nationally recognized civil rights lawyer who fiercely and effectively defends his clients both in the courtroom and in the media. He has appeared on CBS, CNN, and NBC, among other networks, and the stories of his clients have been documented in notable news sources such as The Associated Press and The New York Times. Lewis Unglesby has practiced law for nearly fifty years and has won over twenty-five multi-million dollar jury prizes and over forty-five jury awards exceeding one million dollars. He is certified as a specialist in advocacy and has argued before the Louisiana Supreme Court more than twenty times. Together, Haley and Associates and the law firm Unglesby won a prize of $ 8.2 million in October 2019 for a client with mesothelioma, and a prize of $ 18.9 million in January 2021 for a client with mesothelioma. debilitating effects of head trauma.

The abuse and neglect that Ms. Franklin and so many others have endured can no longer be ignored. We will file a lawsuit tomorrow in 19th Louisiana Judicial District Court on Ms. Franklin’s behalf and we will fight tirelessly for her until justice is served.

There will be a press conference held outside the 19th Judicial District Court on Monday, September 13 at 11:00 a.m. regarding the case.

Ronald S. Haley, Jr., Lewis O. Unglesby, Lance Unglesby,

Jordan Bollinger and Dedrick A. Moore


Expiration of COVID waivers could exacerbate health worker shortages in Pennsylvania


Staffing shortages in healthcare are a national problem, with difficult working conditions, burnout and a highly competitive market fueling the problem.

“If you look at almost any hospital in Pennsylvania, there are many, many, many job postings for these positions,” said Warren Kampf, senior vice president of the Hospital and Healthsystem Association of Pennsylvania. . “Hospitals pay retention premiums, pay premiums to sign and they can’t fulfill them. “

COVID-19 infection rates have increased nationwide, and although Pennsylvania has one of the lowest per capita case rates in the country, infections here are also increasing.

Pennsylvania on Friday recorded more than 4,500 new cases of coronavirus, an unprecedented daily tally since the spring. Hospitalizations are also on the rise, with 1,926 patients bedridden on Friday and 236 on ventilators.

Patients who have postponed care are returning to hospital, flu season begins and emergency rooms fill with patients as public activity resumes, Kampf said. Staffing was difficult even with the waivers.

“With nurses, doctors, [physician assistants], everyone in the hospital is working like crazy under intense pressure, there are a lot of shortages there, ”he said. “You put it all together and it’s very difficult to use. “

When lawmakers return to Harrisburg this month, health care advocates hope there will be swift action to make some of the waivers permanent, including one that allows doctors to use telemedicine. The State House Committee on Aging and Seniors’ Services will hold a hearing Monday to discuss how the lapsed waivers affect older Pennsylvanians.

Most importantly, those who spoke to Spotlight PA said permanent solutions are needed to ensure nurses, doctors and frontline healthcare workers can stay in their jobs.

“The nursing shortage is probably the biggest thing,” Snook said. “No matter how many beds we have, if we don’t have nurses, patients will die.


The advantages of skilled care facilities

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Many aging adults reach a point in their life where they can no longer take care of themselves without help. Some may just need a little help around the home, while others with greater needs may choose to move to skilled nursing facilities.

Some aging adults may be able to choose living facilities for themselves, and many may even dictate their choices as part of their estate planning. In other cases, such as when the elderly suddenly fall ill and are unable to take care of themselves, the decision may have to be made by loved ones. Families have a variety of options when looking for living facilities for aging men and women, and skilled nursing facilities have many advantages.

• Professional care: Many institutions offer qualified nursing care. Qualified nursing care is administered by registered nurses and therapists. Qualified Nursing Facilities, or SNFs, are designed to meet the needs of residents who require a level of medical care that goes beyond what assisted living facilities can provide.

• Peace of mind: Medical care in SNFs is available 24 hours a day. This often provides great peace of mind to relatives of residents, as they know that licensed professionals will be available to meet the needs of their loved ones at any time of the day and of the night.

• Criteria: The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) will only certify facilities that meet strict criteria. When purchasing an SNF, individuals and families should inquire about certification. CMS certified facilities are subject to periodic inspections to ensure residents are receiving the highest quality care. This is another factor that should reassure families.

• Proximity: According to Commonwealth Medicine, there are over 15,000 SNFs in the United States. These establishments accommodate nearly 1.5 million people. With so many facilities across the country, families can surely find one for a family member in need who is near their home. Routine visits from friends and family can help seniors make a smooth transition to an SNF and reassure parents that they won’t have to travel far every time they want to see loved ones.

Skilled care facilities can help aging adults navigate daily life when they can no longer take care of themselves.


Feds: Backlog of Inspections in Health Care Facilities Continues to Grow | Indiana News

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A federal report analyzing the lack of in-depth surveillance in nursing homes nationwide during the COVID-19 pandemic found that the list of facilities that have operated for more than a year without a continuous recertification inspection of s ‘lengthen.

The Office of the Inspector General of the US Department of Health and Human Services released a report in late July detailing how states failed to address inspection backlogs – vigorous in-person surveillance visits commonly referred to as “investigations” by regulators. The federal watchdog found that 71% of nursing homes nationwide lingered for more than 16 months without an annual survey.

In April, a draft CNHI report found that 51% of the country’s nursing homes had gone without inspection for at least 18 months – a longer timeframe than the July report which took into account state delays. , predating the pandemic. Since then, the list of facilities overdue for inspection has grown.

“Comprehensive nursing home inspections – standard surveys – are CMS’s main tool in ensuring that nursing homes meet the minimum standards necessary for the safety and well-being of residents,” the report says. “Yet, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, states have conducted far fewer of these standard surveys, which help identify and correct shortcomings. “

In a typical year, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS, require states to conduct surveys at least every 15 months to meet federal requirements and maintain Medicare / Medicaid certifications. Intense investigations over several days often reveal an assortment of gaps in care and require more operators than other surveillance.

In March 2020, CMS suspended recertification investigations and moved on to infection control investigations, designed to prepare nursing homes for the onslaught of COVID-19 cases. Nursing homes care for some of the most medically vulnerable people in common spaces, making these facilities the most prone to infectious diseases like COVID-19.

As detailed in the CNHI report, these surveys find more problems than infection control surveys, which can take as little as half an hour. In the report, the Newfane Rehab & Health Care Center in western New York had not had a recertification investigation since September 2019. Inspectors visited the facility for a recertification investigation in late June, 21 months afterward. the last.

Inspectors found moderately severe deficiencies in both inspections – the unsafe placement of cords in the 2019 investigation was corrected, but the installation had another electrical issue in 2021, when inspectors discovered exposed wiring.

Infection control investigations between recertification inspections do not prioritize these issues, instead focusing on delays in reporting COVID-19 information.

Newfane, a COVID-19 hotspot in May 2020, reported 31 confirmed deaths from COVID-19 and seven suspected deaths from COVID-19 at the 165-bed facility, according to the New York state press release of August 21.

Newfane did not respond to requests for comment.

Even with the shift from detail-oriented recertification investigations to infection control investigations, an estimated 133,736 nursing home residents have died from COVID-19, accounting for more than 20% of all deaths from the disease. COVID-19.

CMS had good reason to delay inspections, said Tamara Konetzka, professor of public health at the University of Chicago, noting the need to focus on the spread of COVID-19 and concerns about inspectors bringing the virus into establishing or catching the virus from residents.

“At the same time, it’s worrying not to have inspections, especially when visits have been reduced,” said Konetzka, who studies the US long-term care system. “We know that family members help monitor and ensure proper care… inspections and families therefore work in a complementary fashion. “

The loss of both visits and inspections amounted to “almost no surveillance at all,” Konetzka said.

CMS authorized states to resume in-depth inspections in August 2020, provided they have the necessary resources to do so. As the report shows, few States have managed to catch up with inspection delays.

As of June 2020, 8% of nursing homes had spent at least 16 months without a standard survey. In one year, that backlog has swelled to 71% of nursing homes nationwide, according to the OIG report.

The report’s authors recommend that CMS give states advice on prioritizing backlogs of investigations as well as deadlines for completing those inspections – something CMS told CNHI it was doing in March. However, as the report points out, the problem has worsened since the CNHI report this spring.

“We encourage CMS to take the actions outlined above to implement this recommendation and assist states in ensuring the necessary oversight of nursing homes,” the report concludes.

Due to staff shortages and uncertainty, Konetzka argued that maintaining visits should be a priority as it can be performed safely and allow for some oversight. Resumption of inspections should be based on previous nursing home performance, as assessed by CMS Nursing Home Compare, and not on COVID results.

“These are the facilities where we know the quality issues are probably going on and where the lack of monitoring is likely to be the most dangerous,” Konetzka said.


A nursing home in Maine has offered bonuses to workers who do not publicly criticize the shutdown plan

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A Deer Isle nursing home is demanding that employees don’t disparage the home if they want retention bonuses before a slated closing in late October and the state’s rejected strategies on ways to stay open.

Island Nursing Home was the first of three facilities to announce they would close by the end of October after the COVID-19 pandemic put additional pressure on a workforce that has long struggled with low wages and staff retention. The abrupt shutdown rocked and shocked a remote community that depends on it as one of three remaining nursing homes in Hancock County.

The facility has been quiet since it announced it would close on August 30, about two months before it was scheduled to close. But the home goes to great lengths to convince employees to stay before contract staff leave, which will force the home to fire residents immediately, showing just how serious staffing issues are in Maine, which experts at industry fear it will worsen as the pandemic continues.

Island Nursing Home board chair Ronda Dodge said on Wednesday a podcast from the Island Health and Wellness Foundation the facility is expected to lose 13 contract workers by September 22. That will leave the house with 780 hours, or 20 full-time employee positions, unfilled, requiring 50 percent of residents to be fired if the positions are not filled. State rules require one direct care provider for five residents during the day and one for every 15 patients on the night shift.

“Does this mean that the patients are all at risk? No, ”Dodge said, adding that the sudden loss of staff would trigger an emergency closure status allowing the facility to place residents still in the house more quickly. Dodge also said some refused the placement, saying they didn’t think the house was closing.

The home cited long-standing challenges in attracting staff and finding them housing, which forced it to rely on contract workers. The community has since tried to rally around the house, with local lawmakers calling for a solution and residents unsure of where their loved ones might end up.

It was one of 96 long-term care facilities in get a price for houses documenting the pandemic losses, according to Jackie Farwell, spokesperson for the Maine Department of Health and Human Services, but it is not known what the house received.

The department met with nursing home leaders to discuss ways to prevent the shutdown, such as working with families to transfer patients to other facilities or allowing the residential population to decline, Farwell said. Dodge said on Friday the home would not be able to meet staffing needs, even with a reduction in the number of patients.

Employees who wish to stay have been offered a voluntary retention award agreement guaranteeing up to eight hours of extra pay if they work 40 hours per week, although they lose the allowance if they have unforeseen absences. , are dismissed or resign. It requires signatories to agree not to make “defamatory or derogatory statements” on social media or other media regarding management and staff, the closure itself or the operations of the establishment.

The signatories are waiving their right to a jury trial over any disputes arising from signing the agreement, and the house has said it will stop providing the benefit and may sue any employee who violates the no-denigration clause. .

The facilities typically offer retention bonuses to the top-paying staff to keep them, said David Webbert, an employment lawyer and managing partner at Johnson, Webbert & Garvan, who said it was unusual for they are offered to work at the base. Staff. He said the agreement would need to be amended to include a good faith criticism clause, otherwise workers could be discouraged from coming forward for fear of retaliation.

“Things can happen from here [the closing], “he said.” The non-bashing agreement does not take into account the importance of employee feedback. “

Dodge pushed back, saying it was intended to discourage “unnecessary, inaccurate and misinformed discussions on social media and elsewhere that neither serve nor protect the interests of residents, families and staff.” She said language for employees to participate in forensic investigations and court cases is meant to encompass whistleblowing.

An Island Nursing Home staff member, who agreed to speak to the Bangor Daily News on condition of anonymity, said the deal made them “uncomfortable” and feared they would be held accountable after having spoken openly about the closing of the house. They said they were “blinded” by the closure after management told them two days before the establishment would remain open.

“We knew the staffing was bad,” she said. “But they never mentioned that we might have to shut down because of it.”


Feds: Backlog of Inspections in Health Care Facilities Continues to Grow | Local News

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INDIANAPOLIS – A federal report analyzing the lack of in-depth surveillance in nursing homes nationwide during the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed that the list of facilities that have operated for more than a year without continuing recertification inspection to lie down.

The Office of the Inspector General of the US Department of Health and Human Services released a report in late July detailing how states failed to address inspection backlogs – vigorous in-person surveillance visits commonly referred to as “investigations” by regulators. The federal watchdog found that 71% of nursing homes nationwide lingered for more than 16 months without an annual survey.

In April, a draft CNHI report found that 51% of the country’s nursing homes had gone without inspection for at least 18 months – a longer timeframe than the July report which took into account state delays. , predating the pandemic. Since then, the list of facilities overdue for inspection has grown.

“Comprehensive nursing home inspections – standard surveys – are CMS’s main tool in ensuring that nursing homes meet the minimum standards necessary for the safety and well-being of residents,” the report says. “Yet, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, states have conducted far fewer of these standard surveys, which help identify and correct shortcomings. “

In a typical year, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services require states to conduct surveys at least every 15 months to meet federal requirements and maintain Medicare and Medicaid certifications. Intensive multi-day surveys often reveal an assortment of gaps in care and require more operators than other surveillance.

In March 2020, CMS suspended recertification investigations and moved on to infection control investigations, designed to prepare nursing homes for the onslaught of COVID-19 cases. Nursing homes care for some of the most medically vulnerable people in common spaces, making these facilities the most prone to infectious diseases like COVID-19.

As detailed in the CNHI report, these surveys find more problems than infection control surveys, which can take as little as half an hour. In the report, the Newfane Rehab & Health Care Center in western New York had not had a recertification investigation since September 2019. Inspectors visited the facility for a recertification investigation in late June, 21 months afterward. the last.

Inspectors found moderately severe deficiencies in both inspections – the unsafe placement of cords in the 2019 investigation was corrected, but the installation had another electrical issue in 2021, when inspectors discovered exposed wiring.

Infection control investigations between recertification inspections do not prioritize these issues, instead focusing on delays in reporting COVID-19 information.

Newfane, a COVID-19 hotspot in May 2020, reported 31 confirmed deaths from COVID-19 and seven presumed deaths from COVID-19 at the 165-bed facility, according to the New York state statement August 21. Newfane did not respond to requests for comment.

Even with the shift from detail-oriented recertification investigations to infection control investigations, an estimated 133,736 nursing home residents have died from COVID-19, representing more than 20% of all deaths from the disease. COVID-19.

“Almost no surveillance”

CMS had good reason to delay inspections, said Tamara Konetzka, professor of public health at the University of Chicago, noting the need to focus on the spread of COVID-19 and concerns about inspectors bringing the virus into establishing or catching the virus from residents.

“At the same time, it’s worrying not to have inspections, especially when visits have been reduced,” said Konetzka, who studies the US long-term care system. “We know that family members help monitor and ensure proper care… inspections and families therefore work in a complementary fashion. “

The loss of both visits and inspections amounted to “almost no surveillance at all,” Konetzka said.

CMS authorized states to resume in-depth inspections in August 2020, provided they have the necessary resources to do so. As the report shows, few states have managed to catch up with inspection delays.

As of June 2020, 8% of nursing homes had spent at least 16 months without a standard survey. In one year, that backlog has swelled to 71% of nursing homes nationwide, according to the OIG report.

The authors of the report recommend that CMS give states advice on prioritizing the backlog of investigations as well as deadlines for completing those inspections, which CMS told CNHI it was doing in March. However, as the report points out, the problem has worsened since the CNHI report last spring.

“We encourage CMS to take the actions outlined above to implement this recommendation and assist states in ensuring the necessary oversight of nursing homes,” the report concludes.

Due to staff shortages and uncertainty, Konetzka argued that maintaining visits should be a priority as it can be performed safely and allow for some oversight. Resuming inspections should be based on previous nursing home performance, as assessed by CMS Nursing Home Compare, and not on COVID results.

“These are the facilities where we know the quality issues are probably going on and where the lack of monitoring is likely to be the most dangerous,” Konetzka said.


Knox County School Nurses Honored As Knox.biz Healthcare Heroes


Long before COVID-19, Knox County health workers and school nurses were in the trenches caring for the children.

School nurses help students with medication, tube feeding, and even ventilators. They also help with student care plans, which outline a patient’s diagnosis, interventions, and goals of care.

“We’re talking about trained nurses, not band-aids and ice packs,” Fulton High School nurse Sheila Davis said.

Learn more about our winners:Knox.biz 2021 Health Care Heroes Award Recipients

But the pandemic has thrown an important, sometimes overwhelming, task on the knees of school nurses: They were tasked with tracing contacts of COVID-19 cases last school year.

Shelia Davis, nurse at Fulton High School, at L&N STEM Academy on Tuesday August 3, 2021.

When a student or staff member tested positive for COVID-19, school nurses examined pictures of the buses and the dining hall and seating plans to determine who needed to be quarantined.

They called parents and guardians, people who were often stressed because they did not have reliable child care.

“We understood that it was a hardship for parents because we are all parents,” said Davis. “So we figured that out. However, we were in a pandemic and we had to resort to extraordinary means. And we all had to work together, all of us, not just nurses, everyone has to work together and be in pain. comfortable in an uncomfortable situation. “

Health workers worked weekends, late nights and holidays.

Lisa Wagoner, Knox County Schools Health Services Supervisor, pictured in the library at L&N STEM Academy on Tuesday August 3, 2021.

Health services supervisor Lisa Wagoner said she works every weekend from September to March. His team was particularly diligent.

“And you didn’t want to quarantine kids who didn’t need it either,” said Tammy Lane, L&N STEM Academy nurse. “So you had to be prepared.”

“We were in rooms with tape measures,” Gibbs Elementary nurse Sonya Smith said as nurses tried to identify who had come in contact with the virus.

Sonya Smith, nurse at Gibbs Elementary School at L&N STEM Academy, Tuesday August 3, 2021.

“What shocked me was the number of moving parts for contact tracing,” Davis said. “It sounds like a very simple word. Well, it isn’t. We had state spreadsheets that we had to enter all this information on because the health department sent them to Nashville at six. That means if we had cases that day we had to step in; that’s how they got their tally. “

The nurses told Knox News that they have come together as a team and are proud of what they have been able to accomplish. They said things could have been a lot worse without the contact tracing.

Tammy Lane, nurse at L&N STEM Academy, Tuesday August 3, 2021.

“I think we’ve slowed the spread in the school system, really, with contact tracing and quarantining these kids,” Lane said.

When Wagoner started as a school nurse in 1995, she said there were only 12 school nurses. Last school year there were 87 people in the health services team.

The team continued to contact Trace even as the pandemic became increasingly political.

Wagoner serves as the superintendent’s representative on the county health advisory board. She said she learned a lot from the experience, but it was “very difficult”.

Nurses have also battled COVID-19 themselves. Knox News interviewed four school nurses and all of them got it at some point. Lane’s sister was in the intensive care unit with COVID-19.

“Nursing in school is a great job, it’s a very rewarding job,” said Wagoner. “It’s part of public health. And I don’t think public health is ever recognized as it should be. And so the pandemic has moved that a little bit forward, although it’s political now. But I just think we do it, they do a wonderful job. “

Health Services Supervisor Lisa Wagoner, bottom row center, stands with school nurses for the 2020-2021 and 2021-2022 school year on Tuesday, August 3, 2021 at L&N STEM Academy.  The team's contact traced cases of COVID-19 during the 2020-2021 school year.

Name: Knox County School Health Services

Members of the team: 87

What is the most important thing this group has accomplished during the pandemic? “I would say we were an invaluable resource, of course, with COVID, with contact tracing and that sort of thing,” said Lisa Wagoner, health services supervisor at KCS.

Members of the Health Services for the 2020-2021 school year:

Nurses:

Mandy Anastasio, IA

Tiffany Ault, IAA

Julia Ball, IA

Maryanne Barwick Dozier, IA

Nathan Bass, IA

Angie Barbe, LPN

Karen Beatty, IA

Becky Brown, IA

Courtney Bryan, LPN

Amy Campbell, IA

Sherren Chadwell, IA

Cara Chattin, IA

Janine Coleman, IA

Katherine Cox, IA

Lacey Crabtree, IAA

Courtney Crass, LPN

Sheila Davis, IA

Traci Davis, LPN

Cathy Dixon, IA

Jennifer Doherty, IA

Venessa Ebel, IAA

Leah Fulton, IA

Janet Gass, RN

Melissa Gibson, IA

Ashley Gordon, LPN

Michelle Harb, LPN

Marcus Harrell, IA

Tiffany Hayes, IA

Debbie Hermanson, LPN

Tracy Hicks, IA

Ella Hodges, LPN

Lindsay Jackson, IA

King of Charity, IAA

Nichole Kirkland, LPN

Rebecca Kizer, IA

Tammy Lane, IA

Barbara Light, IA

Gina Lothamer, IA

Andrea Luton, IA

Stefanie Matthews, IA

Tiffany Lane McCarrell, IA

Subrina McClendon, LPN

Eileen Menestrina, IA

Tonya Mershon, IA

Davina Morgan, IA

Carrie Murphy, IA

Lacey Mynatt, IA

Claire O’Donnell-Perlov, IA

Stacie Osborne, RN

Lindy Parrott, LPN

Kary Pickard, IA

Laurel Pierce, LPN

Sheila Pulliam, LPN

Misty Reynolds, IA

Rebeka Rice, IA

Danielle Rickert, LPN

Debra Risner, IAA

Mindy Ritter, LPN

Rachel Robbins, IA

LaQuara (Nikki) Roberson, RN

Christina Roberts, IAA

Ashley Rodriguez, IA

Amanda Scheele, IA

Rachel Shelton, IA

Sylvia Simpson, IA

Cristy Smith, IAA

Sonya Smith, IAA

Shelia Steele, IA

Felicia Stewart, IAA

Jennifer Stroh, LPN

Abby Stroupe, LPN

Andrea Thompson, LPN

Ashley Thompson, LPN

Erica Thompson, IA

Kimberly Thompson, LPN

Kerry Trinchera, IA

Blanche Tuell, IAA

Jessica Turnbill, IA

Abbey Tuttle, IA

Jennifer Wilson, IA

Connie Witzeman, IA

Melissa Wright, IA

Shannon Wright, LPN

Lisa Wagoner, IA, MSN, Health Services Supervisor

Chantelle (Mendy) Williams, IA

Other staff:

Teri Lynch-Polos, administrative secretary

Jason Myers, Executive Director of Student Support


Vaccine mandate for future nervous staff in nursing homes will exacerbate staff shortages

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The shortage of staff in long-term care is not new. Wyoming AARP director Sam Shumway said it’s because it’s hard work.

“I mean, you transport people, you help them use the restroom, so there’s a high turnover,” Shumway said. “These are not generally considered to be career types of jobs.”

The industry was trying to make nursing home work more attractive by increasing wages and creating better and more incentives. But then the pandemic struck. Shumway said the pandemic hasn’t helped make work more attractive.

“The current staff are exhausted and work long, long hours. And that doesn’t create a healthy work environment for them, or the people they care for, ”said Shumway.

At the height of the pandemic, many people feared long-term care facilities could experience deadly epidemics and some have. Laura Moore, administrator of the Cody Regional Health Long Term Care Center, said things got so bad that some staff decided they couldn’t do it anymore.

“I think a lot of the health workers have burned out and left the field completely,” Moore said. “We had staff leave during the pandemic, not only here but in an old building where I was.”

It has not helped the industry with its personnel issues. Since the start of the pandemic, AARP has started collecting data on a monthly basis. One of these statistics is the number of establishments reporting staff shortages. As of June 2020, only 24% of long-term care facilities in the state reported staff shortages. In July, it was 37%. At Cody, they have several open positions.

“We probably have, in the long-term care facility, maybe three to five nursing positions. And as many, if not more, CNA positions,” Moore said.

Staff on site work overtime to provide patients with the care they need. When President Biden announced last month it will require nursing home staff to be vaccinated or the facilities will lose their federal money, it has not gone very well.

“I am extremely concerned. And I have made it very clear that I think this is very bad policy,” said Eric Boley, president of the Wyoming Hospital Association.

“When the pandemic started, healthcare workers were held in such high regard. Parades and food were brought to institutions and hospitals, to celebrate the health workers who came to work, caring for these sick people. And now, almost two years later, it’s like it just doesn’t seem to have an impact anymore, that we are still doing this. You carried on with life, but we are still here. And we are still fighting against it. “

Laura Moore, Administrator of Cody Regional Health Long Term Care Center

Boley said that simply mandating nursing home staff to get vaccinated gave them a loophole.

“You have the option of leaving your current employer and entering and obtaining paid employment at another establishment that does not require it.”

For Boley, the federal government must mandate all health workers or none.

Moore in Cody said it puts them in a bind. If they don’t respect the mandate, the federal money will stop coming in and that will shut them down. If they stick to the mandate, it could cost them employees.

“If this results in the departure of some staff, I don’t think it will be a mass exodus,” she said. “I think there are some people who will choose to get the vaccine. And I think there might be some who choose to leave the industry for a while and see how it all plays out.”

Just this week, Governor Mark Gordon announced that he was allocating federal money to hospitals and long-term care facilities to pay for itinerant nurses or ways to retain existing employees. This will act as a band-aid for a while, but Moore said that for existing employees, money just doesn’t do the trick anymore.

“The workers are now at the point where, ‘I’m so exhausted you can offer me some extra money and I’m always going to turn down this shift because I’m just tired,'” she said. declared.

On the contrary, Moore said people need to help boost the morale of healthcare workers.

“When the pandemic started, healthcare workers were held in such high regard. Parades and food were brought to institutions and hospitals, to celebrate the healthcare workers who came to work, caring for these sick people, ”said Moore. “And now, almost two years later, it’s like it just doesn’t seem to have an impact anymore, that we still do. You went on with life, but we’re still here. And we’re still struggling. against this.”

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid will most likely release guidelines for the tenure at the end of this month.


Education and health issues get ‘special’ attention in special session | New


While addressing COVID-19 issues is a priority during this week’s special session of the Kentucky General Assembly, lawmakers across the region recognize the state could face these issues for a long time to come.

Governor Andy Beshear has called the Legislative Assembly in special session starting Tuesday to continue the pandemic measures needed to fight COVID-19.

“This is one of the most dangerous times we’ve experienced in this entire pandemic, with the Delta variant burning through Kentucky and taking more of our loved ones and neighbors,” the governor said.

“It is also increasingly overwhelming our hospitals and shutting down our schools. We need as many tools as possible to fight this deadly wave in order to save lives, prevent children from going to school and keep our economy running.

The lawmaker has decided to extend the COVID state of emergency.

District 2 State Senator Danny Carroll, R-Benton, said the joint resolution passed was “necessary to protect federal funding and also protect some of the leeway that has been given to the executive in various areas to help resolve COVID issues ”.

“These things were necessary, these are all positive things that will help us get through this immediate crisis,” Carroll said.

In terms of responding to concerns about COVID, Carroll and District 3 State Representative Randy Bridges, R-Paducah, want to see more decision-making at the local level.

“I hope we will be able to give more authority to local districts, counties and towns that until now have been one-size-fits-all,” Bridges said. “No one knows their region and their needs better than they (the local authorities)”.

Regarding schools, “I think the goal before you get out of here, obviously with education, is to make some of these decisions locally and provide assistance through the ‘test to stay’ program. that Senate Bill 1 will authorize, ”Carroll said. .

“This should help solve a lot of quarantine issues in our schools and some leeway they have with COVID until we resume the session (in January) to get them through that time. “

One way to deal with the crisis of a growing shortage of healthcare workers, Bridges said, is to relax licensing laws (during the state of emergency) that would allow licensed healthcare workers a license from another state to work more easily in Kentucky.

“Right now, the crisis with our hospitals takes center stage as we move forward,” Carroll said.

“Kentucky is losing health professionals left and right. We have a nursing shortage and that goes beyond this immediate crisis. We need to make sure that our vocational schools and our colleges and universities open up more niches and expand their programs to make sure that we not only have nurses but other health professionals as well.

Carroll said he met with the administration of Baptist Health Paducah last week about the struggles they face.

Carroll said he hopes the problems facing the state will lead to “renewed cooperation between the executive and the legislature, so that we can get things done for the long term.”

Follow David Zoeller on Twitter, @DZoeller_TheSun

Follow David Zoeller on Twitter, @DZoeller_TheSun


Feds: Backlog of Inspections in Health Care Facilities Continues to Grow | New


INDIANAPOLIS – A federal report analyzing the lack of in-depth surveillance in nursing homes nationwide during the COVID-19 pandemic has revealed that the list of facilities that have operated for more than a year without continuing recertification inspection to lie down.

The Office of the Inspector General of the United States Department of Health and Human Services issued a report in late July, detailing how states have failed to address inspection backlogs – vigorous in-person surveillance visits commonly referred to as “investigations” by regulators. The federal watchdog found that 71% of nursing homes nationwide lingered for more than 16 months without an annual survey.

In April, a CNHI reporting project found that 51% of nursing homes nationwide had gone uninspected for at least 18 months – a longer timeframe than the July report which took into account state delays, prior to the pandemic. Since then, the list of facilities overdue for inspection has grown.

“Comprehensive nursing home inspections – standard surveys – are CMS’s main tool in ensuring that nursing homes meet the minimum standards necessary for the safety and well-being of residents,” the report says. “Yet, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, states have conducted far fewer of these standard surveys, which help identify and correct shortcomings. “

In a typical year, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) require states to conduct surveys at least every 15 months to meet federal requirements and maintain Medicare / Medicaid certifications. Intense investigations over several days often reveal an assortment of gaps in care and require more operators than other surveillance.

In March 2020, CMS suspended recertification investigations and moved on to infection control investigations, designed to prepare nursing homes for the onslaught of COVID-19 cases. Nursing homes care for some of the most medically vulnerable people in common spaces, making these facilities the most prone to infectious diseases like COVID-19.

As detailed in the CNHI report, these surveys find more problems than infection control surveys, which can take as little as half an hour. In the report, the Newfane Rehab & Health Care Center in western New York had not had a recertification investigation since September 2019. Inspectors visited the facility for a recertification investigation in late June, 21 months afterward. the last.

The inspectors found moderately severe deficiencies during the two inspections – unsafe placement of the cordon in the 2019 the investigation has been corrected, but the installation had another electrical problem in 2021, when inspectors discovered exposed wiring.

Infection control surveys between recertification inspections do not prioritize these issues, instead focusing on delays in reporting COVID-19 information.

Newfane, a COVID-19 hotspot in May 2020, reported 31 confirmed Deaths from COVID-19 and seven presumed deaths from COVID-19 at the 165-bed facility, according to the New York state press release of August 21.

Newfane did not respond to requests for comment.

Even with the shift from detail-oriented recertification investigations to infection control investigations, an estimated 133,736 nursing home residents have died from COVID-19, accounting for more than 20% of all deaths from the disease. COVID-19.

CMS had good reason to delay inspections, said Tamara Konetzka, professor of public health at the University of Chicago, noting the need to focus on the spread of COVID-19 and concerns about inspectors bringing the virus into establishing or catching the virus from residents.

“At the same time, it’s worrying not to have inspections, especially when visits have been reduced,” said Konetzka, who studies the US long-term care system. “We know that family members help to monitor and ensure proper care… inspections and families therefore work in a complementary fashion.”

The loss of both visits and inspections amounted to “almost no surveillance at all,” Konetzka said.

CMS authorized states to resume in-depth inspections in August 2020, provided they have the necessary resources to do so. As the report shows, few States have managed to catch up with inspection delays.

As of June 2020, 8% of nursing homes had spent at least 16 months without a standard survey. In one year, that backlog has swelled to 71% of nursing homes nationwide, according to the OIG report.

The report’s authors recommend that CMS give states advice on prioritizing backlogs of investigations as well as deadlines for completing those inspections – something CMS told CNHI it was doing in March. However, as the report points out, the problem has worsened since the CNHI report this spring.

“We encourage CMS to take the actions outlined above to implement this recommendation and assist states in ensuring the necessary oversight of nursing homes,” the report concludes.

Due to staff shortages and uncertainty, Konetzka argued that maintaining visits should be a priority as it can be performed safely and allow for some oversight. Resuming inspections should be based on previous nursing home performance, as assessed by CMS Nursing Home Compare, and not on COVID results.

“These are the facilities where we know the quality issues are probably going on and where the lack of monitoring is likely to be the most dangerous,” Konetzka said.


Hogan makes booster shots available to nursing home residents and people with health concerns – Maryland Matters

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A nurse shoots a dose of vaccine as the Marylanders receive their second dose of the Moderna coronavirus vaccine at the Cameron Grove Community Center on March 25 in Bowie. Photo by Win McNamee / Getty Images.

Marylanders aged 65 and older who live in nursing homes and other collective care facilities became eligible for COVID-19 booster injections on Tuesday, by order of Governor Lawrence J. Hogan Jr. (R).

Seniors who live in assisted living facilities, residential drug treatment centers, and group homes for people with disabilities have also become eligible for vaccines, which health experts say may enhance protection against the disease. coronavirus.

Hogan issued the order after the state’s antibody testing program determined that more than 60% of vaccinated residents had “some form of declining immunity over time, and showed that up to a out of three is now particularly vulnerable ”.

He also cited an Israeli study which concluded that a booster – usually a third dose of Pfizer / BioNTech or Moderna vaccines – led to an 11-fold reduction in infections and a ten-fold decrease in serious illness.

“All the evidence clearly shows that we cannot afford to delay taking decisive action to protect our most vulnerable citizens,” Hogan said.

The state’s research tested more than 500 nursing home residents.

The state health department also issued guidelines on Tuesday ordering all pharmacies and health care providers to provide a booster “without the need for a prescription or doctor’s order to anyone who considers themselves to be immunocompromised, ”Hogan said.

“No one in this category should be refused a reminder,” he added.

The governor said Maryland has a large vaccine supply and does not plan to reopen mass vaccination sites when the general public becomes eligible for the boosters.

A potential White House hopeful in 2024, Hogan continued his criticism of the federal government, saying states “had to operate without clear direction” from the CDC or the FDA as to when the booster injections will be. recommended for people under 65 and those who do not. health conditions.

“The limited advice we received has been confusing and contradictory,” Hogan said, echoing complaints he made on a Sunday talk show, “and it’s still unclear when and how more people will become eligible “.

According to the state Department of Health, an average of 17 in 100,000 Maryland residents tested positive last week, a decrease of 15% since the beginning of September.

Hogan said his administration was “proud” that Maryland is different from states that have “growing numbers … with case rates spiraling out of control and hospitals overflowing.”

Could we add something like this? According to the CDC, community transmission of COVID is “high” in 19 of Maryland’s 24 jurisdictions, and “substantial” in the remaining five.

Hogan also announced a $ 3M Community COVID-19 Vaccination Project, which he described as a “door-to-door canvassing effort to directly engage Marylanders living in low-rate areas. vaccination program and in order to encourage more vaccinations ”.

The project will also provide health education in “neighborhoods at risk”.

“Vaccines are the most effective way to protect people from serious illness, hospitalization and death,” he said, adding that only 0.2% of fully vaccinated Marylanders have been hospitalized.

In an era when right-wing figures and media tout unproven treatments, Hogan encouraged people who test positive and begin to experience symptoms to consult their health care provider about monoclonal antibody therapy. .

“These monoclonal antibodies are the only approved and effective treatment for COVID-positive people who are symptomatic but not yet severe enough to require hospitalization,” Hogan said.

Maryland has performed more than 10,000 infusions at 30 facilities, Hogan said, an effort that has dramatically reduced hospitalizations and deaths.

[email protected]


Strawberry Fields REIT Acquires Six Nursing Facilities In Kentucky, Tennessee For $ 81 Million


One of the properties, Agape Rehabilitation & Nursing Center, is an 84 bed skilled nursing facility located at 505 North Roan St. in Johnson City, Tenn.

SOUTH CURVE, IND. –Strawberry Fields, a South Bend-based owner of long-term care hospitals, skilled nursing and assisted living, has acquired six skilled nursing facilities located in Kentucky and Tennessee for $ 81 million. The properties include:

• Landmark of Kuttawa, a 65-bed specialty nursing facility located at 1253 Lake Barkley Drive in Kuttawa, Ky., Which was built in 1968.
• Agape Rehabilitation & Nursing Center, an 84-bed skilled nursing facility located at 505 North Roan St. in Johnson City, Tennessee, which was built in 2005.
• Waters of Sweetwater, a 90 bed rehabilitation and nursing facility located at 978 Highway 11S in Sweetwater, Tenn., Which was built in 1966.
• Waters of McKenzie, a 72 bed rehabilitation and nursing facility located at 14510 Highway 79 in McKenzie, Tenn.
• Waters of Memphis, a 90-bed rehabilitation and nursing facility located at 6500 Kirby Gate Blvd. in Memphis, was built in 2015.
• Waters of Bristol, a 120 bed rehabilitation and nursing facility located at 2830 Highway 394 in Bristol, Tenn., Was built in 2017.

Some facilities offer physical, speech and vocational therapy for short-term rehabilitation clients as well as long-term care residents. These establishments also have a nursing department, which provides nursing care in the establishment, as well as a registered dietitian who plans well-balanced meals for the residents of each establishment.

Facilities at the facilities include a beauty salon and hair salon, chapel, library, activity room and dining room. The properties were built between 1956 and 2017 and underwent renovations between 1983 and 2020. The properties were 79% occupied at the time of sale.

The Kentucky facility will join the Landmark portfolio, which operates throughout Kentucky, Texas, Oklahoma, Illinois and Michigan. Each of the Waters-branded operators at the five Tennessee facilities hired Tennessee-based Infinity Healthcare to provide advisory services.


Maryland reports nursing facilities have highest and lowest staff vaccination rates after vaccination mandate goes into effect – CBS Baltimore


ANNAPOLIS, Maryland (WJZ) – The Maryland Department of Health reported COVID-19 vaccination rates for staff at the state’s most and least-qualified nursing facilities on Monday. More than 70 of the state’s nursing facilities have more than 91 percent of their staff vaccinated.

Maryland’s mandate that all hospital and nursing home staff be vaccinated came into effect on September 1. Nursing homes that fail to comply with the mandate or fail to report their staff’s immunization data will face increased fines, civil penalties and enforcement action, the state said.

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Fifteen nursing homes in the state are 100 percent staff immunized. The center with the lowest rate is Bethesda Health and Rehabilitation with 24% staff vaccination.

There are 74 establishments in the list of the top 10 establishments classified by staff ratio with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine. See the full list on Qualified nursing facility vaccination dashboard.

Here are the last 10 establishments classified by staff rate with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine:

  1. Bethesda Health and Rehabilitation = 24%

  2. Meadow Park Health and Rehabilitation Center = 39%

  3. Calvert County Nursing Center = 49%

  4. Cumberland Health Center = 50%

  5. Sterling Care in the village of Frostburg = 52%

  6. Dennett Road Manor = 53%

  7. Autumn Lake Health Care at Loch Raven = 56%

Autumn Lake Healthcare in Denton = 56%

  1. Anchorage Health Center = 57%

  2. Coffman Nursing Home = 58%

Brightwood Powerback Campus rehabilitation = 58%

Calvert Manor Rehabilitation and Health Center = 58%

READ MORE: Now that the students have returned to class, one question remains: Are the children safe?

  1. Caroline Rehabilitation and Health Care Center = 59%

The following 11 nursing homes did not submit adequate immunization data, the state said.

  1. Forestville Health Center

  2. Regency treatment of Silver Spring

  3. Bel Pré Health Center

  4. Salisbury Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

  5. City of Ellicott Health Center

  6. Charlotte Hall Veterans’ House

  7. Fayette Health and Rehabilitation Center

  8. Fall Lake Health Care at Alice Mansion

  9. Fall Lake Health Care in Chesapeake Woods

  10. Waldorf Center

  11. Maria Health Care Center

Maryland Department of Aging secretary Rona E. Kramer said the state will continue to impose penalties on facilities that fail to meet the mandate.

“We are at a stage in the COVID-19 pandemic that requires healthcare facilities to remain extremely vigilant on immunization and other health and safety fronts, including data reporting,” Kramer said. “We will re-impose civil financial penalties on nursing homes that fail to comply and provide the required data that has been crucial in guiding how state and local entities respond to COVID-19 and protect our relatives.”

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Update on Maryland’s Top 10 and Top 10 Qualified Nursing Facilities Ranked by Staff Immunization Rate


September 6, 2021

Media contact:

Deidre McCabe, Director, Communications Office, 410-767-3536

Charles Gischlar, Deputy Director, Media Relations, 410-767-6491

Update on Maryland’s Top 10 and Top 10 Qualified Nursing Facilities Ranked by Staff Immunization Rate

The Maryland Department of Health also announces 11 facilities that did not submit adequate data required by the state

Baltimore, Maryland – The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) today announced an update on the top 10 and last 10 skilled nursing facilities in the state, ranked by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a vaccine against COVID-19 and highly contagious variants. MDH also announced an update on skilled nursing facilities that failed to submit adequate COVID-19 vaccination data for staff, as required by the state.

Through new vaccination protocols effective September 1, 2021, all nursing home staff must now receive their first or only dose of COVID-19 vaccine. Nursing homes that do not comply with new vaccination protocols or do not report their vaccination data will face increased fines, civil penalties and enforcement action.

On May 4, 2021, the Maryland Department of Aging launched the Qualified Nursing Facility Immunization Dashboard, which publishes weekly data on residents and staff vaccinated against COVID-19 at each of the state’s skilled nursing facilities.

“The fact that 74 care facilities in Maryland have 91% or more of their staff with at least one dose of a life-saving COVID-19 vaccine is a reflection of our statewide commitment to protect our residents. more vulnerable, ”said MDH Secretary Dennis R. Schrader. “Facilities that are not compliant must immediately take action to comply with the protocols put in place to ensure the safety of our seniors. “

“We are at a stage of the COVID-19 pandemic that requires healthcare facilities to remain extremely vigilant on immunization and other health and safety fronts, including data reporting,” said Rona E. Kramer, secretary of the Maryland Department of Aging. “We will re-impose civil financial penalties on nursing homes that fail to comply and provide the required data that has been crucial in guiding how state and local entities respond to COVID-19 and protect our relatives. “

The 10 Best Nursing Homes and Skilled Gathering Facilities in Maryland

classified by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

  1. St. Mary’s Nursing Center = 100 percent

Fairland Center = 100 percent

Manor Care Health Services – Adelphi = 100 percent

Manor Care Health Services – Bethesda = 100 percent

Sagepoint Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 100 percent

Patuxent River Health and Rehabilitation Center = 100 percent

Althea Woodland retirement home = 100 percent

Bethesda Coach Hill = 100 percent

Larkin Chase Center = 100 percent

Maplewood Park Square = 100 percent

Brighton Gardens from Tuckerman Lane = 100 percent

Maryland Baptist Aged Home = 100 percent

Saint-Joseph Nursing = 100 percent

Broadmead = 100 percent

Place du parc Roland = 100 percent

  1. Hammonds Lane Center = 99 percent

Franklin Woods Center = 99 percent

Collingswood Rehabilitation and Health Care Center = 99 percent

Bedford Court Care Center = 99 percent

Fall Lake Health Care in Glade Valley = 99 percent

Glen Meadows Retirement Community = 99 percent

Elkton Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 99 percent

Edenwald retirement community = 99 percent

Doctors Community rehabilitation and patient care = 99 percent

  1. Wilson Health Care Center = 98 percent

  2. Autumn Lake Health Care at Cherry Lane = 97 percent

Ridgeway Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 97 percent

Autumn Lake Health Care at Bridgepark = 97 percent

Fahrney-Keedy Memorial House = 97 percent

Villa Rosa Nursing and rehabilitation = 97 percent

Lorien Bulle Rock = 97 percent

Friends’ retirement home = 97 percent

Frederick Citizens Care and Rehabilitation Center = 97 percent

Rockville Retirement Home = 97 percent

Northampton Manor Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 97 percent

  1. Crescent Cities Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 96 percent

Montgomery Village Health Center = 96 percent

Ingleside at King Farm = 96 percent

The Fall Ridge in North Oaks = 96 percent

Fox Chase Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 96 percent

Miller’s Grant Lutheran Village = 96 percent

  1. Manor Care Health Services – Chevy Chase = 95 percent

Manor Care Health Services – Potomac = 95 percent

Transitional care services at Mercy Medical Center = 95 percent

Brooke Grove Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 95 percent

Westminster Health Center = 95 percent

South River Health Center = 95 percent

Lutheran Village of Carroll = 95 percent

Forest Haven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 95 percent

The Nursing and Rehabilitation Center at Stadium Place = 95 percent

  1. Sligo Creek Center = 94 percent

Arcola Health and Rehabilitation Center = 94 percent

Advantageous house = 94 percent

North Arundel Health and Rehabilitation Center = 94 percent

  1. Oak Manor Rehabilitation and Health Care Center = 93 percent

Shady Grove Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 93 percent

Keswick Multiple Care Center = 93 percent

The Solomons of Asbury = 93 percent

Hillhaven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 93 percent

  1. Charles Village future care = 92 percent

Augsburg village = 92 percent

Brinton Woods Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 92 percent

Pineview Future Care = 92 percent

Moran Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 92 percent

Allegany Health Nursing and Rehabilitation = 92 percent

Future Care Canton Harbor = 92 percent

  1. Chesapeake Future Care = 91 percent

Lorien Health Systems Mt. Airy = 91 percent

Marley Neck Health and Rehabilitation Center = 91 percent

Fall Lake Health Care at Spa Creek = 91 percent

Fall Lake Health Care at Homewood = 91 percent

Northwestern Health Center = 91 percent

Glen Burnie Health and Rehabilitation Center = 91 percent

Lochearn retirement home = 91 percent

The last 10 skilled nursing homes and assembly facilities in Maryland

classified by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

  1. Bethesda Health and Rehabilitation = 24%

  2. Meadow Park Health and Rehabilitation Center = 39%

  3. Calvert County Nursing Center = 49%

  4. Cumberland Health Center = 50%

  5. Sterling Care in the village of Frostburg = 52%

  6. Dennett Road Manor = 53%

  7. Autumn Lake Health Care at Loch Raven = 56%

Fall Lake Health Care in Denton = 56%

  1. Anchorage Health Center = 57%

  2. Coffman retirement home = 58%

Brightwood Powerback Campus Rehabilitation = 58%

Calvert Manor Rehabilitation and Health Center = 58%

  1. Caroline Center for Rehabilitation and Health = 59%

Nursing home and skilled assembly facilities in Maryland

who did not submit adequate data on personnel vaccinated against COVID-19

  1. Forestville Health Center

  2. Regency treatment of Silver Spring

  3. Bel Pré Health Center

  4. Salisbury Rehabilitation and Nursing Center

  5. City of Ellicott Health Center

  6. Charlotte Hall Veterans’ House

  7. Fayette Health and Rehabilitation Center

  8. Fall Lake Health Care at Alice Mansion

  9. Fall Lake Health Care in Chesapeake Woods

  10. Waldorf Center

  11. Maria Health Care Center

For more information on CRISP nursing home reporting requirements, please see this transmission to all administrators of retirement homes. Institutions are required to report certain information themselves on a weekly or daily basis.

For establishments with questions about the data reported for their establishment, send an email mdh.snfdata@maryland.gov.

For the most recent data on Maryland COVID-19, visit coronavirus.maryland.gov.

– ### –


Group of disabled people break admission rules during nursing class – The New Indian Express

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Express news service

NEW DELHI: A group of health professionals with disabilities raised the issue of the Indian Nursing Council (INC) restricting the five percent reservation in the BSc nursing course only to people with lower limb disabilities and that too for 40 to 50 percent of people with disabilities.

Responding to the concerns, Dr Satendra Singh, founder of Doctors with Disabilities: Agents of Change, wrote to the secretaries of the Union Ministry of Health and the Department of Disability Empowerment, as well as the chairman of the ‘Indian Nursing Council (INC).

“Unlike the competency-based curriculum of the National Medical Commission (formerly MCI) in 2019, which lacked the keyword ‘dignity’, the revised INC curriculum emphasizes disability, diversity and human rights. man and mentions the term “dignity” in six places, ”the letter to INC read.

“However, there are a few areas of concern and we would like to highlight for your immediate attention and rectification – barriers to eligible learners with disabilities; obstacles for color blind candidates; lack of disability skills to advocate for the rights of people with disabilities in the school curriculum; barriers for eligible learners with disabilities, ”the letter added. However, according to the group, the INC did not respond to the letter and therefore wrote to the Union Ministry again.

“The reservation policy states that a five percent disability reservation should be considered for applicants with disabilities with a locomotor disability of 40 to 50 percent of the lower limb,” the letter read. The group called for the repeal of the “discriminatory” clause, to involve nurses with disabilities and disability rights activists in the development of new guidelines and to include disability skills in the new curriculum.


Strawberry Fields REIT Acquires Six Nursing Facilities In Kentucky And Tennessee For Over $ 80 Million


SOUTH CURVE, Ind., September 2, 2021 / PRNewswire / – Strawberry Fields, owner and lessor of long-term acute care hospitals, skilled nursing facilities and assisted living facilities in the Midwest and Southern United States, today announced the ” acquisition of six qualified nursing establishments located in Kentucky and Tennessee.

The purchase price was ~ $ 81 million and Strawberry Fields used the product of a 3rd Bond offer on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange to finance this acquisition.

“The acquisition of these six new properties is part of our continued expansion in Heartland,” noted Moishe Gubin, CEO of Strawberry Fields. “This portfolio fits well geographically with our existing Strawberry Fields facilities in Tennessee and Kentucky and will be a great addition to our current operators. “

The Kentucky the facility will join the Landmark portfolio, which operates throughout Kentucky, and in Texas, Oklahoma, Illinois, and Michigan. Each of the operators of The Waters brand at the five Tennessee facilities, have engaged Infinity Healthcare to Tennessee to provide consulting services.

The properties include:

  • Landmark of Kuttawa is a 65 bed specialty nursing facility that was built in 1968 and is located at 1253 Lake Barkley Drive in Kuttawa, Kentucky.
  • Agape Rehabilitation & Nursing Center (A Water’s Community), was built in 2005 and is an 84 bed skilled nursing facility located at 505 North Roan Street in Johnson City, Tennessee.
  • Waters Pure water, A rehabilitation and nursing center located at 978, route 11S, in Sweetwater, Tennessee. This skilled nursing facility is a 90-bed home that was built in 1966.
  • Waters McKenzie, A rehabilitation and nursing center with 72 beds. Built in 1969, this property is located at 14510 route 79 in McKenzie, Tennessee.
  • Waters Memphis, A rehabilitation and nursing center built in 2015 with 90 beds. This nursing qualified property is located at 6500 Kirby Gate Blvd. in Memphis, Tennessee.
  • Waters Bristol, A rehabilitation and nursing center, is located at 2830, route 394 in Bristol, Tennessee. This facility offers 120 beds and was built in 2017.

Moishe Gubin concluded: “The completion of this acquisition and this new series of bonds on the Tel Aviv Stock Exchange contributes to Strawberry Fields’ goal of continuously growing our portfolio to increase shareholder value.

SOURCE Strawberry Fields REIT LLC


Bankruptcies and closures continue for retirement homes and skilled nursing facilities – Business Daily News


The still difficult operating environment of the global pandemic is forcing several other living and care facilities for the elderly to file for bankruptcy or to announce closure plans.

A New Hampshire seniors community is the latest to file for Chapter 11 bankruptcy in order to execute its Skokie, Ill., Sale to Covenant Living Communities & Services. Hillside Village Keene, a non-profit organization that provides assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing services, cited financial problems following the COVID-19 pandemic when she filed her case on Monday, according to a report in Sentinel Keene.

Covenant Living plans to pay $ 33 million for Hillside Village, according to court documents.

Last week, a nonprofit that owns senior residences funded by municipal bonds in Georgia and Alabama also filed for bankruptcy, threatening to impose losses on bondholders. Subsidiaries of Regional Housing and Community Services Corp. issued about $ 50 million in municipal bonds issued through the Wisconsin Public Finance Authority, according to a report by Bloomberg. The company, which is affiliated with for-profit operator ALG Senior based in Hickory, North Carolina, has retained GGG Partners as a restructuring advisor, according to its filing with the U.S. North District Bankruptcy Court. from Georgia.

Finally, a nursing home in Maine on Monday announced plans to close in October after nearly 40 years of operation. Island Nursing Home & Care Center executives said in a press release that the challenge of finding qualified staff over the past decade has become too difficult, mainly due to the lack of affordable housing near the facility.

“Now, due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the national health workforce crisis has reached a critical point. Facilities like ours can no longer find qualified personnel, ”the board said in the statement. “For the INH, it is no longer a question of location or funding. … There is simply not enough qualified staff available in a rapidly declining health care workforce. We have spent months exhausting all the staff resources at our disposal and starting this fall we will no longer be able to meet our minimum staffing requirements. “


MDH classifies vaccination rates in nursing facilities; Calvert County is low | thebaynet.com | TheBayNet.com


BALTIMORE, Maryland – The Maryland Department of Health (MDH) today announced an update on the top 10 and last 10 qualified nursing facilities in the state, ranked by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a vaccine against COVID-19 and highly contagious variants. MDH also announced skilled nursing facilities that failed to submit adequate COVID-19 vaccination data for staff, as required by the state.

As announced by Governor Larry Hogan on August 18, new vaccination protocols entered into force, with all nursing home staff required to show their first or single dose of COVID-19 vaccine by September 1.

On May 4, 2021, the Maryland Department of Aging launched the Qualified Nursing Facility Immunization Dashboard, which publishes weekly data on residents and staff vaccinated against COVID-19 at each of the state’s skilled nursing facilities.

Maryland’s skilled nursing facilities understand their role in protecting our most vulnerable residents in the state from COVID-19 and have worked diligently to ensure that residents and staff at their facilities are immunized against this. fatal disease, ”said MDH Secretary Dennis R. Schrader. . “With 88.9% of residents and 81.9% of staff with at least one dose of COVID-19 vaccine now, they are doing their part in our fight against this pandemic.”

“I am delighted that nursing facilities and their staff across the state are responding to our call to step up and increase the number of staff now vaccinated against COVID-19,” said Rona E. Kramer, secretary of the department. of aging Maryland. “Some facilities still have a way to go and I have no doubts that they will continue to make positive progress.”

Maryland’s 10 Best Nursing Homes and Skilled Assembly Facilities Ranked by Percentage of Staff with at Least One Dose of a COVID-19 Vaccine:

  • Sagepoint Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 100 percent
  • Larkin Chase Center = 100 percent
  • Maplewood Park Square = 100 percent
  • Brighton Gardens from Tuckerman Lane = 100 percent
  • The Nursing and Rehabilitation Center at Stadium Place = 100%
  • Maryland Baptist Aged Home = 100 percent
  • Franklin Woods Center = 99 percent
  • Fairland Center = 99 percent
  • Bedford Court Care Center = 99%
  • Patapsco Valley Center = 99%
  • Collingswood Health and Rehabilitation Center = 98%
  • Edenwald retirement community = 98 percent
  • Oak Manor Center for Rehabilitation and Healthcare = 98 percent
  • Elkton Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 97 percent
  • Carriage Hill Bethesda = 97 percent
  • Villa Rosa Nursing and Rehabilitation = 97 percent
  • Glen Meadows Retirement Community = 97 percent
  • Wilson Health Care Center = 97 percent
  • Hammonds Lane Center = 97 percent
  • Rockville Nursing Home = 97 percent
  • Waldorf Center = 96 percent
  • Ingleside at King Farm = 96 percent
  • Bel Pré Health Center = 96 percent
  • Broadmead = 96 percent
  • Fox Chase Rehabilitation and Nursing Center = 96 percent
  • Althea Woodland Nursing Home = 96 percent
  • Montgomery Village Health Center = 96 percent
  • Vantage House = 96 percent
  • Miller’s Grant Lutheran Village = 96%
  • Manor Care Health Services – Chevy Chase = 95 percent
  • Manor Care Health Services – Potomac = 95 percent
  • Autumn Lake Healthcare in Glade Valley = 95%
  • Transitional care services at Mercy Medical Center = 95%
  • Brooke Grove Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 95%
  • Roland Park Place = 95 percent
  • Friends’ retirement home = 94 percent
  • Sligo Creek Center = 94 percent
  • Arcola Health and Rehabilitation Center = 94 percent
  • Lutheran Village of Carroll = 94 percent
  • North Arundel Health and Rehabilitation Center = 94 percent
  • Shady Grove Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 93%
  • Layhill Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 93 percent
  • South River Health Center = 93%
  • Salisbury Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 92%
  • Marley Neck Health and Rehabilitation Center = 92 percent
  • Augsburg village = 92 percent
  • Autumn Lake Healthcare at Cherry Lane = 92 percent
  • Fahrney-Keedy Memorial Home = 92 percent
  • Frederick Citizen Care and Rehabilitation Center = 92 percent
  • Manor Care Health Services – Largo = 92 percent
  • Hillhaven Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 91 percent
  • Manor Care Health Services – Bethesda = 91 percent
  • Chesapeake Future Care = 91 percent
  • Autumn Lake Healthcare in Spa Creek = 91 percent
  • Northwestern Health Center = 91%
  • Manoir Caton = 91 percent
  • Doctors Community rehabilitation and patient care = 91 percent
  • Sub-unit of the North West hospital center = 91%
  • Summit Park Health and Rehabilitation Center = 91 percent


The last 10 skilled nursing homes and assembly facilities in Maryland

classified by percentage of staff with at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine

  • Autumn Lake HealthCare in Chesapeake Woods = 49%
  • Sterling Care in the village of Frostburg = 50%
  • Dennett Road Manor = 50%
  • Cumberland Health Center = 52%
  • Calvert County Nursing Center = 54%
  • Autumn Lake Health Care at Loch Raven = 55%
  • Anchorage Health Center = 56%
  • Coffman retirement home = 57%
  • Calvert Manor Health and Rehabilitation Center = 57%
  • Autumn Lake Healthcare in Denton = 58%
  • Oakland Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 59%
  • Caroline Rehabilitation and Health Care Center = 59%
  • Levindale Hebrew Geatric Center and Hospital = 60%
  • Snow Hill Nursing and Rehabilitation Center = 60%
  • Cadia Healthcare – Hagerstown = 60%


Nursing home and skilled assembly facilities in Maryland

who did not submit adequate data on personnel vaccinated against COVID-19

  • Cadia Healthcare – Annapolis
  • Forestville Health Center
  • Birch Manor Health and Rehabilitation Center
  • Chesapeake Ribs
  • Williamsport Retirement Home
  • Brightwood Powerback Campus Rehabilitation
  • The Fall Ridge in North Oaks
  • Maria Health Care Center
  • Greater Baltimore Medical Center Subacute Care Unit
  • Fall Lake Health Care in Oakview
  • Saint-Joseph Nursing
  • City of Ellicott Health Center
  • Manor Care Health Services – Roland Park

Nursing homes and skilled assembly facilities in Maryland with enforcement actions

Since April 29, 2020, nursing homes are required to report certain data in the CRISP system. This CRISP data is analyzed daily and is crucial in guiding state and local responses to COVID, as well as providing hospitals with the information needed to facilitate timely hospital discharges. This week, the MDH’s Office of Healthcare Quality (OHCQ) will impose civil monetary penalties on 55 nursing homes that have not complied with CRISP reporting requirements for at least one day in the first two weeks. August.

For more information on CRISP nursing home reporting requirements, please see this transmission to all nursing home administrators. Institutions are required to report certain information themselves on a weekly or daily basis.

For facilities with questions about the data reported for their facility, send an email to mdh.snfdata@maryland.gov.

For the most recent data on Maryland COVID-19, visit coronavirus.maryland.gov.


Top Qualified Nursing Institutions of 2021


Site Why we chose it Key service lines Number of States
Care for the elderly ProMedica Best overall Cardiac, diabetic, oncological, orthopedic, pulmonary, stroke and wound care 26 states
America Life Care Centers Ideal for long term care services Rehabilitation care, Alzheimer’s and dementia 28 states
Society of the Good Samaritan Ideal for the range of services Orthopedic rehabilitation and memory care 24 states
Brookdale retirement home Best for Medicare Orthopedic rehabilitation and memory care 42 states
The Ensign group Ideal for Medicaid Orthopedic rehabilitation and stroke 14 states


Frequently Asked Questions

What is a skilled nursing facility?


A skilled nursing facility is a place where a person receives care from trained and licensed healthcare professionals to help them treat, improve, or manage a patient’s condition.

A person may need skilled nursing care after having an operation, such as a hip replacement, or after having had a stroke. Some of the services may include:

  • Medication administration
  • Occupational therapy
  • Physical therapy
  • Speech therapy
  • Wound care

A qualified nursing home is not the same as a nursing home. The main difference is that a skilled nursing facility is usually not designed for a person to stay there indefinitely. A person stays in a qualified nursing care facility with the aim of improving their health and returning to their home or to a retirement home-type environment.

Does the insurance cover qualified nursing care facilities?

Health insurance policies outside of Medicare will often cover qualified nursing care facilities. The extent of this coverage depends on several factors such as:

  • Your type of insurance policy
  • Whether the skilled nursing facility is networked or off-network
  • The type (s) of care you need

Some people choose to purchase a separate long-term care policy that can help supplement the costs of skilled nursing home care.

Does Medicare Cover Qualified Nursing Facilities?

Medicare covers a stay in a nursing facility qualified under Part A of Medicare, which pays for a hospital stay or hospital care at a qualified nursing facility. For Medicare to cover the stay in the facility, a doctor must certify that a person is in need of qualified nursing care. The person should also choose a Medicare-certified facility.

Medicare also sets a certain number of days that it will pay for skilled nursing care.

What are the reimbursable costs associated with qualified nursing facilities?

Medicare pays for qualified nursing home care by “indemnity period”. Whenever a person has a hospital stay and subsequent stay in a skilled nursing facility, Medicare will pay for up to a certain number of days. the expenses reimbursable through health insurance for a skilled nursing facility include:

  • $ 0 for the first 20 days of a benefit period
  • $ 185.50 coinsurance for days 21 to 100 of a benefit period
  • All charges after day 100

A person can have more than one benefit period in a year. However, a person must go 60 days without inpatient hospital care or qualified nursing home care to enter a new benefit period.

What accreditations should I look for when selecting a qualified nursing facility?

Accreditation means that a facility has an independent body that evaluates its facility to confirm that it provides high quality care. There are several organizations that can grant accreditation to a qualified nursing facility. These include:

• Accreditation of aging services from the Rehabilitation Establishment Accreditation Commission (CARF)

• The Joint Commission, which offers a “Gold Seal of Approval” for qualified nursing facilities

If you are evaluating a qualified nursing facility, you can ask if it is accredited and what accreditation it has.

the Medicare website has a section called “Nursing Home Compare” which contains, among other information, reviews of qualified nursing facilities. You can rate facility sites based on complaint information, qualified nursing facility inspection, and facility quality metrics, which can help you choose the best facility for you or someone else. Dear. The site also rates facilities on a scale of 1 to 5 stars.

When Should You Consider a Qualified Nursing Facility?

Qualified nursing facilities are beneficial when a person needs rehabilitation, ranging from physiotherapy to occupational therapy. This often happens after a person has had a hospital stay due to surgery, injury, or a health event such as a stroke.

The alternative to a skilled nursing facility could be home care. However, qualified nursing staff can provide more in-depth service and 24-hour care. Usually, a doctor can help you determine which option is needed.

How long can you stay in a skilled nursing facility?

A stay in a qualified nursing home may be related to your general health and insurance coverage. The qualified nursing facility and your doctor should contact you if you require additional care. Often, insurance companies can continue to pay as long as a doctor re-certifies that care is still needed.


How we choose the best qualified nursing facilities

We looked at over 15 of the nation’s largest qualified nursing facility companies in the United States and looked at the range of services offered, insurance accepted, presence of programs designed to help residents return home, and awards and honors, if applicable. We have also given preference to qualified nursing facilities that operate in multiple states.


Recalls could arrive to nursing home residents and healthcare workers by the end of September

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As COVID-19 infections increase in long-term care facilities, plans are stepping up to give booster shots to the elderly who live there, likely by the end of September, officials said.

A total of 184 nursing home residents and 94 staff members contracted COVID-19 the week ending August 14, the Illinois Department of Public Health reported Wednesday.

That is compared to 128 residents and 74 staff in the week ending August 7, reflecting the spread of the highly infectious delta strain of COVID-19. The total number of nursing home cases hovered in the 1930s for most of June, but began to increase in July.

Healthcare workers and long-term care facilities were among the first to receive COVID-19 vaccines in December and January as the vaccines debuted.

The federal government recommends a booster shot starting eight months after an individual’s second dose, and the US Department of Health and Human Services will likely offer these doses starting the week of September 20, the spokesperson said. from the IDPH, Melaney Arnold.

“At that point, people who were fully immunized at the start of the immunization rollout, including many health care providers, nursing home residents and other elderly people, will likely be eligible for a reminder, ”she said.

“The HHS would also begin efforts to provide booster shots directly to residents of long-term care facilities at that time, given the vaccine distribution to this population early in the vaccine rollout and the increased risk. continued that COVID-19 poses them. “

Why do exceptional cases occur in long-term care facilities, given the high rate of vaccination?

Experts blamed the delta variant, the fact that residents of nursing homes live in close quarters and the elderly are more vulnerable to infections.

“With age, the immune response is blunted, so the success of the vaccine and the ability to generate a large antibody response declines a bit,” said Dr Mark Loafman, chair of the family and community medicine department of Cook County Health.

“That’s where the concept of a third dose comes in. There’s just a little less immunity as we get older, and it starts around 50 and continues every decade thereafter,” said Loafman.

Distributing vaccines to the public was initially problematic in Illinois, with a vaccine shortage, high demand, and long queues at mass sites and clinics.

Now, “Illinois has built a solid infrastructure of COVID-19 vaccine providers – pharmacies, local health departments, clinics, doctors, hospitals and more,” said Arnold. “Federal health officials have indicated that the booster dose will be given from eight months after an individual’s second dose, so not everyone will need to be vaccinated at the same time. We continue to monitor vaccinations and will increase plans as needed. “

About 85% of residents of long-term care facilities in the United States are fully vaccinated against COVID-19; however, staff rates are at 60.5%, according to the US Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Near their home, “tragically, only 26.3% of Illinois nursing homes have reached the 75% staff immunization threshold,” said the AARP state director of the. Illinois, Bob Gallo, in a statement. “On the other hand, residents of the EHPADs they care for are vaccinated at a rate of 83.8%.


Local health facilities process positive tests and adjust protocols | News, Sports, Jobs


MARQUETTE – COVID-19 is still making its presence known in local elderly care facilities.

The Marquette County healthcare facility in Ishpeming posted on Facebook on Friday that a staff member had tested positive for COVID as the facility completed its first round of epidemic testing. All the staff and remaining residents were negative, he said.

“We will continue epidemic testing for 14 days”, the post reads. “We will resume visits at that time until we have more cases. We are seeing an increase in the number of cases in our area and it is spreading among those vaccinated, so we have made changes to our visits at this time for the safety of our staff and residents. “

The facility requires that all visitors wear a surgical mask and eye protection during a visit, regardless of their immunization status, the MCMCF said. It also only allows children 13 and older.

“Thank you all for your support and understanding as it has been a long and difficult road as we continue to keep everyone safe” It said.

Norlite Nursing Center, located in Marquette, also posted an update Friday on Facebook, indicating that the previous week it had learned of two concurrent outbreaks of residents at senior nursing facilities on the peninsula. superior.

He also learned that two facilities in Marquette County had employees testing positive for COVID-19 – triggering strict protocols at his facilities.

“At least one of the resident outbreaks started from a vaccinated, asymptomatic employee unknowingly bringing in the virus and spreading it,” Norlite’s post reads about an outbreak at another facility. “As of yesterday, 12 residents – 10 vaccinated and two unvaccinated – and three employees in total are included in the epidemic. They’ve opened up their COVID wing, they’ve hired a recruiting agency, and they’re all very scared of the extent of this spread in their facility. “

Norlite officials did not name the senior nursing facilities mentioned in the post. No further information was available on the identity of these facilities before press time.

Norlite, who experienced a COVID-19 outbreak in 2020 that left eight people dead, said she put all staff and visitors back in mandatory N95 masks on Thursday.

“Today we learned that Marquette County’s positivity rate has increased again, this time to 4.2%. “ It said. “This is more than double the rate seen last Friday of 2.0%. Community spread is becoming frightening and we now define our status as part of a “moderate transmission” community as defined by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS).

Norlite said that as of Friday, the facility is implementing other COVID-19 protocols to prevent an outbreak. They understand:

All staff, regardless of their immunization status, are required to be tested starting today.

≤ All visitors, regardless of their immunization status, are encouraged to take a test starting today.

≤ Refusal to test may result in modified tours, including strict enforcement of social distancing, relegation to outdoor areas only, and time limits to allow all residents access to tours, as the space on the patio is limited.

≤ Norlite strongly encourages outside visits for all visits at this time.

≤ If the positivity rate exceeds 10%, Norlite will be tested twice a week.

≤ Norlite will regularly reassess these protocols.

“Thank you for your patience, your understanding of our unique position, which is to balance the rights and freedoms of our residents while ensuring the safety of everyone. “ the post reads. “We have to depend on each other to get through the tough times, and we send our prayers to the UP teams going through the epidemics.”

Christie Mastric can be reached at 906-228-2500, ext. 250. His email address is cbleck@miningjournal.net.

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Healthcare worker reflects on ‘the incredible journey of nursing’ and thousands of patients after 5 decades


Dedicated Teesside healthcare worker retires after five impressive decades on the job.

Lynn Armstrong, Patient Safety Coordinator and former nurse, has worked in the health field in the Northeast since the age of 17.

The 65-year-old began her nursing career in Sunderland in 1973 and now bids farewell to her beloved colleagues after 20 years at North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Trust.

Read more:Stark warning as ‘heart of gold’ dad loses Covid battle after delaying jab to donate blood

During her years as a ward sister in Sunderland, Lynn even worked alongside Julie Gillon, now managing director of North Tees and the Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust.

In 2001 she moved to the new Hartlepool University Hospital before joining the Patient Safety team in 2011, working tirelessly to ensure that patients have a positive experience in Trust hospitals.

Now, retiring just days after her 65th birthday, Lynn remembers the thousands of patients she has helped throughout her healthcare journey.

Lynn said, “The game of time is wonderful. It doesn’t seem like five minutes have passed since I was young and started my nursing career. Now I say goodbye to you with lots of beautiful memories.

“I want to thank my friends and colleagues across the Trust for making my retirement so special and being part of my incredible journey in nursing. It has been a pleasure and a privilege to work with all of you.

Lynn is looking forward to taking trips on her boat and spending more time with her family now that she is retired.

She continued: “After 20 years with North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust, I have been totally overwhelmed with the best wishes, cards and gifts I have received on my retirement.

“Thank you very much to this organization for – it’s been a great trip. “

Despite Lynn’s departure, her son Iain, a nursing student in the Trust’s emergency assessment unit, succeeded him at the Trust.

He joined his retirement celebrations alongside Lynn’s colleagues in patient safety and Trust CEO Julie Gillon.

Julie said: “It has been a pleasure working alongside Lynn all these years – she has made an incredible contribution to patients not only at our Trust, but across the North East.

“On behalf of everyone at North Tees and Hartlepool NHS Foundation Trust, I would like to wish Lynn a happy and healthy retirement.”

For the latest Hartlepool news delivered straight to your inbox, go here to subscribe to our free newsletter


Salem nursing home immunization data reveals ‘wide range’

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In each of the 11 nursing homes in the Salem area, at least half of their workers have been fully immunized by August 8, according to federal data.

But there is a wide range between facilities in which health workers have received their vaccines. A few homes – Dallas Retirement Village Health Center and Avamere Court in Keizer – barely go halfway. Other facilities have about 80% of health workers fully immunized, according to data released by the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

In recent weeks, there has been more emphasis on vaccination as people sick with the delta variant of COVID-19 fill hospitals. The wave has also raised the stakes of efforts to vaccinate caregivers. The delta variant largely attacks the unvaccinated, but also poses a risk to vulnerable people with weaker immune systems, such as people living in nursing homes.

A graphic from the CDC demonstrating how the delta variant spreads more easily than previous versions of the new coronavirus.

President Joe Biden announced last week that his administration would effectively require nursing home workers to be immunized by tying federal funding through Medicare and Medicaid to immunization in these settings.

Nursing homes are only one type of long-term care facility and are regulated by the federal government. There are other types of long-term care facilities, such as assisted living and residential care, which are regulated by the state.

COVID-19[FEMININE:L’USI de l’hôpital de Salem est plein, mais l’hôpital dit qu’il a la capacité de traiter tout le monde

Éclosions, taux de vaccination dans les établissements de soins de longue durée

Au mercredi 18 août, il y avait 72 éclosions actives dans les établissements de soins de longue durée de l’Oregon. Six cent soixante-six cas et 24 décès sont associés à ces épidémies.

Le gouverneur Kate Brown a annoncé jeudi que les prestataires de soins de santé agréés par l’Oregon, y compris les travailleurs des établissements de soins de longue durée, doivent être entièrement vaccinés contre le COVID-19 d’ici le 18 octobre ou six semaines après l’approbation de la Food and Drug Administration – selon la dernière éventualité.

Dans neuf des 11 maisons de soins infirmiers des comtés de Marion et de Polk, le taux de vaccination parmi les agents de santé de chaque établissement est plus élevé que celui de l’ensemble de la population du comté dans lequel se trouve l’établissement. Dans le comté de Marion, 61 % des résidents sont entièrement vaccinés. , et dans le comté de Polk, 65% des résidents le sont.

Parmi les maisons de soins infirmiers des comtés de Marion et de Polk, l’établissement avec le taux le plus élevé d’agents de santé vaccinés est Marquis Marian Estates à Sublimity, où environ 84% des agents de santé sont vaccinés, selon les données fédérales.

Les sociétés Marquis ont commencé à proposer des vaccins sur place aux travailleurs en décembre 2020, a déclaré la porte-parole Jenna Cooper dans un e-mail au Statesman Journal.

Cooper a souligné une communication « précoce et proactive » sur le vaccin et des efforts pour éduquer le personnel sur l’efficacité et l’innocuité du vaccin. La société possède également Consonus Pharmacy, qui a été approuvée pour fournir le vaccin, et qui a permis à la société de fournir « en toute transparence » le vaccin aux travailleurs, a déclaré Cooper.

« La direction de Marquis a communiqué l’efficacité et l’innocuité scientifiquement fondées du vaccin COVID-19 au personnel, aux résidents et à leurs familles de manière cohérente et transparente », a déclaré Cooper.

Cooper a déclaré que Marquis Companies soutenait les efforts de l’administration Biden pour imposer des vaccins aux travailleurs des maisons de soins infirmiers et qu’elle continuait à “former (son) personnel avec des informations scientifiques”.

Le Statesman Journal a appelé les 11 établissements des comtés de Marion et de Polk dans les données fédérales, mais certains ont déclaré qu’aucun administrateur n’était disponible ce jour-là et la plupart des autres n’ont pas renvoyé de messages sollicitant des commentaires.

Percentage of workers vaccinated in Oregon nursing homes varies

Of the two counties, the facility with the lowest vaccination rate among workers is the Dallas Retirement Village Health Center in Polk County, with 51.5% of healthcare workers fully vaccinated against COVID-19. The facility with the second lowest rate in the two counties is Avamere Court in Keizer, where just under 55% of health workers are fully immunized.

Right in the middle of the Salem area is the Independence Health and Rehabilitation Center, where 71% of health workers are vaccinated, according to federal data.

Across the state, there is even greater variation in immunization among nursing home workers. Some facilities in the Portland area have immunized almost all of their health workers. At the bottom of the scale, 12 of Oregon’s 130 or so nursing homes reported that less than half of their healthcare workers had been fully immunized.

Here is what proportion of workers were fully immunized in each nursing home in Marion and Polk counties as of August 8, 2021, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services:

  • Providence Benedictine Nursing Center: 75%
  • French Prairies Nursing and Rehabilitation Center: 82%
  • Independence Health and Rehabilitation Center: 71%
  • Avamere Transitional Care in Sunnyside: 76%
  • Dallas Retirement Village Health Center: 52%
  • Windsor Health and Rehabilitation Center: 67%
  • Cour d’Avamère in Keizer: 55%
  • Salem Transitional Care: 66%
  • Domains Marquis Marian: 84%
  • Les Chênes at Sherwood Park: 78%
  • Tierra Rose Care Center: 69%

More information on vaccines

COVID-19 vaccines are free and widely available in Oregon. You can visit covidvaccine.oregon.gov/ to find a place near you to get the vaccine.

If you want to learn more about the vaccine, how it works, and how scientists have studied its safety, you can visit cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/safety/safety-of-vaccines.html, or talk to your doctor.

Vaccination:Where to get a COVID-19 vaccine in Marion, Polk counties

Claire Withycombe is a reporter for the Statesman Journal. Contact her at cwithycombe@statesmanjournal.com, 503-910-3821 or follow on Twitter @kcwithycombe.

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Czech Republic: Health professions are becoming fashionable | Europe | News and events from across the continent | DW


In the Czech Republic, the devastation of the coronavirus pandemic peaked in late 2020 and early 2021: the country of 10.5 million people leads the world in infections and deaths per capita . In total, some 1.7 million Czechs have fallen ill and to date more than 25,000 people in the EU state have died from COVID-19.

The only thing that kept the Czech healthcare system from collapsing, even when the pandemic was at its peak, was the enormous effort made by the country’s 40,000 or so doctors and 80,000 nurses and caregivers. The fact that there weren’t even more deaths and that hospitals avoided the disaster is in large part thanks to them.

During the pandemic, doctors, nurses and caregivers quickly became heroes in the eyes of the vast majority of Czechs, so it’s no wonder that an image of a nurse from the COVID-19 station of the Bulovka Hospital in Prague was selected as Czech Press Photo of the Year in 2020.

And many think it is fair that they be seen as such because these doctors, nurses and medical professionals have often pushed themselves to the absolute limit. Although hospitals introduced hygiene measures early on and made sure staff were among the very first in the country to be vaccinated, the Czech Medical Chamber says some 12,000 doctors, 30,000 nurses and 25,000 members of hospital staff contracted COVID-19 at the end of June 2021 – 34 doctors and 54 nurses died from infections at work.

Young Czechs are among those who have volunteered to help fight COVID-19; many now choose medicine as their profession

Healthcare professions gain in prestige

The situation led to a change in society: before the coronavirus pandemic, interest in the medical professions was so low that Czech hospitals had to hire staff from abroad, mainly in Slovakia and Ukraine. The number of Czechs who now pass entrance exams to health care training programs has increased by more than 50% over the past year.

“The coronavirus pandemic is largely responsible for the increased reputation of the medical professions,” Karel Cvachovec, dean of the faculty of health sciences at the Technical University of Liberec, told the web portal seznam.cz. “People realized, almost in real time, how essential such professions are and that those with such training could still find a job.”

Nursing is “promising and stable”

Jana Hola, Dean of the Medical Department at the University of Pardubice, confirmed this, saying: “The pandemic has created a demand for these professions. COVID-19 has shown how vital the sector is.” Deputy Dean Karel Sladek told DW that one of the main drivers of increased interest in the medical professions is the social prestige they have gained during the pandemic.

“Many young people have seen serious action on the front lines of the fight against the coronavirus – and they are not about to be scared, quite the contrary, they are pursuing careers in the healthcare system,” says Sladek. This is good, he added, because the health professions make sense. In addition, the sector is “promising and stable, especially since the number of graduates currently will not be sufficient to fill all the positions that will become available as the Czech health system doubles in size in the coming years”.

Karel sladek

Karel Sladek says young people entering the healthcare profession will easily find stable employment in the future

Lack of money and internships

Yet despite the growing interest in health care training, the Czech government has yet to adequately fund training institutions. This means that these cannot accept more interns than they could before the pandemic. “We need an analysis of how many people want to enter the health professions and what it would cost to train them,” Czech Health Minister Adam Vojtech recently told public radio Czech Radio.

According to a study commissioned by the University of Pardubice, the state will have to double the posts of nursing trainees if it hopes to meet the country’s future needs. Currently, such training costs around € 4,000 ($ 4,680) per year.

Thousands of volunteers

Beyond professional healthcare training, the coronavirus pandemic has also sparked interest in volunteer work in healthcare facilities. About 3,000 Czechs, including the author of this article, have received basic Red Cross training. Some 1,500 of them were called in to help in hospitals during the darkest days of the pandemic and hundreds more were helped in nursing homes and other health facilities.

Many of these people have continued to volunteer even though the coronavirus has subsided. “Interest in volunteer work has definitely increased, even now more and more people are still asking how they can help,” Ilona Kyrsova, coordinator of the Prague University Hospital Volunteer Center, told DW.

She herself is a person who left her old profession to get involved in health care. “I had a good job in a multinational, but during the coronavirus pandemic I decided to do something that I found more important and meaningful,” says Kyrsova. “This job gives meaning to my life.”

This article was translated from German by Jon Shelton


Reported cases among nursing home workers, residents

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Two local nursing homes are reporting cases of COVID-19 among workers, and one has also reported multiple cases among residents.

There were 92 new cases of COVID identified in Union County from Sunday, August 15 to Saturday, and a local resident has died from the virus. Active cases peaked the week on Saturday at 169.

Statewide, more than 14,000 cases have been identified and 178 Arkansans died from the virus last week. There were more than 25,000 active COVID cases in the state on Saturday.

Retirement homes

According to the Arkansas Department of Health, an Advanced Health and Rehabilitation of Union County worker actively had COVID-19 as of August 16. The worker tested positive for the virus on August 10, according to an ADH report.

In total, including through 2020, 44 workers at Advanced Health and Rehab have contracted COVID-19, as well as 44 residents, seven of whom have died from the virus. The last time a resident of the home tested positive for COVID was February 2.

However, at the Hudson Memorial Nursing Home, three residents had active cases of COVID-19 on August 16, with the most recent positive test result coming back on August 9. A Hudson worker also had an active case of the virus, with their test having tested positive on August 12.

Hudson experienced a severe outbreak of COVID during the early stages of the pandemic in 2020, and a total of 70 residents there contracted the virus, 21 of whom died from their infections, and 57 workers caught it.

Statewide, 190 nursing home residents contracted COVID-19 in the two weeks leading up to August 16.

According to the Arkansas Center for Health Improvement, as of August 1, Advanced Health and Rehab had vaccinated 100% of its residents. Courtyard Healthcare and Rehabilitation had 94% of its residents vaccinated and Hudson had an 88% vaccination rate among residents.

Intensive care capacity

As a regular Union County Quorum Court meeting wrapped up on Thursday, Sheriff Ricky Roberts rose to deliver the sad news: County jailer Dominique Noble had passed away.

“We have just learned that one of our jailers has died. He was rushed to hospital last Saturday in a diabetic coma. Without intensive care beds here, they transferred him to Fayetteville,” he said. said Roberts. “We ask you to pray for his family.”

As of Friday, there were 19 intensive care beds available across Arkansas, according to the ADH. There were 1,783 open regular hospital beds and 517 ventilators available.

Lori DeWese, director of marketing for the Medical Center of South Arkansas, said there were 10 COVID patients in the hospital’s intensive care unit on Saturday morning. She said there were times when no intensive care bed was available there.

“Sometimes this week all of our intensive care beds were in use. As the hospital continuously unloads and admits throughout the day, our patient numbers and bed availability are fluid and represent a unique snapshot in time, ”DeWese said. “When we don’t have availability for additional patients in intensive care, patients who need a higher level of care are stabilized and transferred to another hospital.”

Monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID-19 is available in the hospital for some people who have contracted the virus, she said. According to the CDC, monoclonal antibody therapy helps a person’s immune system recognize and respond to the virus more effectively.

Arkansas guidelines for qualifying for monoclonal antibody treatment include being at high risk for symptoms of COVID progressing to severe levels; not be vaccinated or be immunocompromised; and be at high risk of exposing someone to the virus.

“High risk” for symptoms of COVID progressing to severity is defined with these criteria: being 65 years of age or older; having a body mass index of 35 or more, or having a BMI in the 85th percentile or more for people 12 to 17 years old; to be pregnant; have diabetes or another immunosuppressive disease; have cardiovascular disease; have chronic lung disease; have sickle cell anemia; have neurodivergent disease; or having a technological dependence related to medicine, such as the use of oxygen.

“People who test positive for COVID-19 should talk to their doctor about whether monoclonal antibody therapy is available for them,” DeWese said.

Vaccines

Six hundred doses of the COVID vaccine were administered in Union County last week, and as of Saturday, about 40% of the county’s population had received at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine.

Governor Asa Hutchinson said this week that vaccination was the state’s best chance to tackle the current outbreak of COVID-19.

“These statistics that we are seeing – both the increase in the number of cases as well as the statistics that vaccination is your best way to avoid hospitalization or serious consequences -… we continue to focus on vaccinations. “, said the governor.

Booster vaccines are currently available in Arkansas for people who are moderately to severely immunocompromised, and Secretary of State for Health Dr. Jose Romero has encouraged those who are eligible to take advantage of the boosters.

“I encourage them to get their booster doses; they can get them at any pharmacy or local health unit or with their primary care providers or sub-specialists, if they have any,” said Romero.

The UAMS Mobile Health Unit will make its second stop in a week in El Dorado on Wednesday August 25, for a vaccination clinic which is scheduled from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at 2299 Champagnolle Road, headquarters of the SHARE Foundation. The clinic is organized in partnership with the SHARE Foundation and Interfaith Clinic.

Three COVID-19 vaccines developed by pharmaceutical companies Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson have been approved for use in the United States. The Pfizer vaccine has been approved for use in people as young as 12 years old, while the latter two are approved for use in anyone over 18 years of age.

On Wednesday, the clinic will offer the vaccination to anyone 12 years of age or older. Vaccines are free for everyone and no one needs health insurance to get vaccinated against COVID-19.

To register for the immunization clinic scheduled for Wednesday, call 501-526-2211. for more information, contact [email protected]

In Union County, COVID vaccines are also available by appointment, at Melvin’s Discount Pharmacy, Walmart, Walgreens and the local Union County Health Department. To schedule a vaccination appointment with Melvin, call 870-863-4155; for Walmart, visit walmart.com/COVID; for Walgreens, visit walgreens.com/findcare/vaccination/covid/19/landing and for the local health unit, call 1-800-985-6030.

Walmart also announced this week that the 2021 flu vaccine is available now. According to a press release from the company, certified pharmacists and healthcare professionals administer both influenza and COVID vaccines in stores across the country, including in El Dorado.

To learn more about flu shots and wellness resources available at the local Walmart, visit www.walmart.com/wellnesshub.

COVID testing is also available in Union County at SAMA, at 600 S. Timberlane in El Dorado; South Arkansas Medical Center at 700 W. Grove in El Dorado; Walgreens at 701 W. Grove and 2135 N. West Ave in El Dorado; Union County Local Health Unit at 301 American Rd. in Eldorado; and the Strong Clinic at 253 S. Concord in Strong.


Home Health Care and Home Nursing Services Market 2021 and Analysis to 2027 – Brookdale Senior Living, Sunrise Senior Living, Emeritus Corporation


A2Z Market Research announces the release of Home Health Care and Home Nursing Services Market research report. The market is expected to grow at a sustained rate in the coming years. Home Healthcare and Home Nursing Market Research Report 2021 presents an analysis of the market size, share and growth, trends, cost structure, statistical data and complete world market. The report gives a clear picture of the current market situation. It understands the historical and technological advent of digital wallpaper, macroeconomic and driving factors and assesses the market size in terms of value and volume, in the market.

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The main companies listed in this report are: Brookdale Senior Living, Sunrise Senior Living, Emeritus Corporation, Atria Senior Living Group, Extendicare, Gentiva Health Services, Senior Care Centers of America, Kindred Healthcare, Genesis Healthcare Corp., Home Place Senior Care.

As analytics has become an inherent part of every business activity and role, a central role in the decision-making process of businesses today is mentioned in this report. Over the next few years, the demand for the market is expected to increase dramatically globally, enabling healthy growth of the home health care and home nursing services market is also detailed in the report. This report highlights the manufacturing cost structure which includes cost of materials, cost of labor, depreciation cost, and cost of manufacturing procedures. Price analysis and equipment supplier analysis is also performed by analysts in the report.

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The report, with the help of detailed business profiles, analysis of project feasibility, SWOT review, and few different insights of key organizations working in the Home Healthcare and Healthcare Market nursing home, presents a point-by-point scientific brief of the competitive scenario of the market. The report also presents a review of the effect of recent market developments on the future development prospects of the market.

Market segmentation

Segment by type

Home Health Care Services, Home Nursing Services

Segment by application

Male female

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Geographic analysis

The global home health care and home nursing services market is spread across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East, Africa and the rest of the world.

COVID-19 impact assessment

The COVID-19 pandemic has emerged in containment across regions, line limitations and the breakdown of transport organizations. In addition, the financial vulnerability of the home health care and home nursing services market is much higher than past outbreaks such as Extreme Severe Respiratory Illness (SARS), Avian Flu, Swine Flu, avian flu and Ebola, inferred from the increasing number of infected people and vulnerability to exiting the crisis. With the rapid increase in cases, the global home healthcare and nursing home refreshments market is influenced from several perspectives.

Accessibility of the workforce is obviously disrupting the inventory network of the global home healthcare beverage market and home nursing service as lockdown and the spread of infection encourage people to stay indoors. The presentation of home care and nursing home manufacturers and the transport of products are associated. If the assembly movement is stopped, the transport as well as the warehouse network also stop. Stacking and dumping of items i.e. raw materials and results (fasteners), which require a ton of labor, are also heavily affected due to the pandemic. From the entrance of the assembly plant to the warehouse or distribution center to end customers, i.e. application companies, the entire healthcare inventory network to home and home nursing services is severely compromised as a result of the episode.

The research provides answers to the following key questions:

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Global Toilet Seats Market Report 2021 Size, Share, Growth and Forecast to 2028


Health News Roundup: US To Require Nursing Home Employees Get Vaccinated Against COVID-19; Cancer patients’ own cells used in 3D printed tumors to test treatments and more

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Here is a summary of the current health briefs.

US to force nursing home workers to get COVID-19 vaccine

President Joe Biden said on Wednesday his administration would require nursing home workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19 as a condition of facilities participating in government health programs Medicare and Medicaid. Biden made the announcement hours after the publication of a study https://bit.ly/3mebUYT showing the effectiveness of COVID-19 vaccines for residents of nursing homes and long-term care facilities, where residents are often elderly and frail, has given up since the Delta variant became dominant in the United States.

Cancer patients’ own cells used in 3D printed tumors to test treatments

Researchers used brain cancer patients’ own cells in a form of 3D printing material to make a model of their tumor to test the effectiveness of potential treatments before using them for real inside the body. . Scientists extract ‘a piece’ of tumor from the brain of a patient with glioblastoma – an aggressive cancer with a very poor prognosis – and use it to print a model corresponding to their MRI scans, said Professor Ronit Satchi-Fainaro , who led the research. at Tel Aviv University.

No need for COVID booster shots at this time – WHO

Current data does not indicate that COVID-19 booster shots are needed, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday, adding that the world’s most vulnerable people should be fully immunized before countries high income earners do not deploy a supplement. The comments came just before the U.S. government said it planned to make booster shots widely available to all Americans from September 20 as infections of the Delta variant of the coronavirus increase.

Asian Airlines Report High Vaccination Rate Among Crews

Asian airlines are reporting high vaccination rates among pilots and cabin crew as they wait for strict border controls linked to the region’s pandemic to be relaxed. International travel to the Asia-Pacific region remains down about 95% from pre-pandemic levels, and concerns over the Delta variant have led to even stricter quarantines or flight caps in some locations , leaving many crew members inactive and hoping for recovery.

Vaccine rollout in Sydney accelerated as COVID-19 cases in Australia reached high level

Australian authorities on Thursday began distributing emergency COVID-19 vaccines in the Sydney suburb most affected by an outbreak of the fast-growing Delta strain, as the country reported its biggest increase in a day of COVID-19 infections. New South Wales State Prime Minister Gladys Berejiklian said the surge of vaccinations in Australia’s largest city gave some hope as the city battles its worst outbreak since the start of the coronavirus pandemic.

UK study shows COVID-19 vaccine effectiveness decreases under Delta

A UK public health study has found that protection against one of the two most commonly used COVID-19 vaccines against the now widespread Delta variant of the coronavirus wanes within three months. He also revealed that those infected after receiving two injections of the Pfizer-BioNTech or AstraZeneca vaccine may be at higher risk for others than with previous variants of the coronavirus.

New Zealand identifies origin of Delta outbreak as cases rise

New Zealand’s COVID-19 outbreak rose to 21 cases on Thursday, but authorities said the virus may not have been in the community for a long time as they linked its origin to a recent returnee from Sydney . Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern and Chief Health Officer Ashley Bloomfield told a press conference that 11 new cases had been reported in the past day.

Mask war worsens in southern US where COVID-19 cases are highest

Florida’s largest school district on Wednesday imposed a mask mandate in defiance of the state governor, the latest chapter in the political battle against coronaviruses in the southern United States where new infections are highest. In a one-day meeting that has at times become controversial, the Miami-Dade County School Board voted to require that most of the district’s 360,000 students, as well as staff, wear face covers when classes start on Monday. Governor Ron DeSantis previously banned local mask warrants.

South Korea’s COVID-19 tally rises as authorities consider tighter distancing

South Korea reported more than 2,000 new cases of the coronavirus for the second time on Thursday as it struggles to bring a wave of outbreaks under control over the summer vacation, driven by the more contagious Delta variant. South Korea has successfully tackled epidemics since its outbreak began early last year through intensive testing and tracing, but now faces persistent spikes in infections and vaccine shortages .

US appeals court upholds Texas ban on second trimester abortion

The 5th U.S. Court of Appeals on Wednesday upheld a Texas law effectively prohibiting the most common abortion procedure for ending second trimester pregnancies, overturning a decision last year by a panel of three judges of the same court. Wednesday’s decision marks the first time a U.S. federal court has upheld a ban on the standard abortion method used after 15 weeks of pregnancy – dilation and evacuation, or D&E – although some other states have acted to l ‘to forbid.

(This story was not edited by Devdiscourse staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)


Arkansas Health Care Association Says COVID-19 is Improving in Nursing Homes


JONESBORO, Ark. (KAIT) – Rachel Bunch, executive director of the Arkansas Health Care Association, says cases are far fewer in nursing homes.

In Craighead County, at present, the only nursing home or assisted living facility with cases is Lakeside Health and Rehab and St. Bernards Village.

Lakeside Health and Rehab have 46 cases. In the past 14 days, one case is active, 42 have recovered and three have died.

In the village of St. Bernards, they have 19 cases, including one active, 16 recovered and three deaths. Bunch says those are big numbers, compared to last year.

“Have 190 residents who tested positive in the last 14 days, 295 health workers who tested positive in the last 14 days. What I would say to you is that overall we are doing well compared to where we were in the past, ”Bunch said.

Bunch says it’s thanks to the vaccine.

“Vaccines have changed that. We keep the most staff and residents vaccinated in the FCC, and we’ve had it for many months now, and I’m really proud of it, ”Bunch said.

She says severe cases have also declined. In most cases, residents do not have as many symptoms.

“We still have a few hospitalizations, but not as many as we had. The other thing that we are able to offer now that is better and a great option for so many of our patients is monoclonal antibody therapy and we have been able to do that at this facility now, ”said Bunch.

Bunch also questioned the numbers on the Arkansas Center for Improving Health Care (ACHI) dashboard, saying the group is misrepresenting the facts and sensationalizing the pandemic at a time when healthcare workers have most in need of our support.

“He made statements with him, called out some facilities about the number of deaths and different things that unfortunately have really created fear in some of our communities,” Bunch said. “Many facilities contacted us to tell us that some of the data reported was inaccurate. “

ACHI responded on Wednesday evening with the following statement:

“The data used in the ACHI dashboard is self-reported weekly by nursing homes to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and posted on the CMS website. ACHI did not change any of the reported data, but provided an easy way for the Arkansans to access it. ACHI provided a copy of the dashboard to the Arkansas Health Care Association a week before publication and offered options for submitting corrections. At this stage, we have not been contacted by any retirement home. For people with loved ones in nursing homes or for families considering placing a loved one in such a facility, we believe this is important information to share. “

Copyright 2021 KAIT. All rights reserved.


Qualified nursing facilities face challenges associated with changing state demands


Find out 6 of the UL 1069 requirements for nurse call equipment. The new Quick Response Pro from RF Technologies is UL 1069 certified.

To meet the growing need for a UL 1069 Wireless Nurse Call System, RF Technologies (RFT) is pleased to launch Quick Response® Pro.

State requirements for qualified nursing facilities are evolving to require nurse call systems to comply with UL 1069 standard for hospital signaling and nurse call equipment. Nine states require UL 1069 by code, and another 10 states have adopted the standard and may begin implementing it soon. This trend is an important signal to existing facilities and new constructions to seriously consider the sustainability of their facilities with a nurse call system compliant with the UL 1069 standard.

In addition to changing state requirements, hard-wired nurse call systems in older facilities can make it difficult and expensive to renovate or expand to meet the demand for skilled nursing services. The downside of hardwired systems is the fixed pull cord devices which, although hardwired, are often not connected to a computer system. These stationary devices are more expensive to maintain and move, and patients must be moved from their rooms during construction due to dust, or worse, asbestos.

To meet the growing need for a UL 1069 Wireless Nurse Call System, RF Technologies (RFT) is pleased to launch Quick Response® Pro. After several months of third-party testing, Quick Response Pro has achieved UL 1069 certification to ensure system safety, durability, and performance. RFT’s wireless nurse call solution is managed by its CODE ALERT® Enterprise software, which also acts as a central call announcement panel. CODE ALERT Enterprise provides an intuitive user interface for receiving and categorizing alerts, offers a facility map view to quickly see the location of alerts, and includes comprehensive QAPI reports with the Quality Dashboard module.

Quick Response Pro maintains a home-like aesthetic while going beyond traditional pull-tab needs for patients to call for help. The system integrates with a variety of devices to enable quick notification of personnel, including hallway overhead lights, quick displays, strobe light with siren, and multi-colored zone lights. Installations interested in learning more about Quick Response Pro are encouraged to request a free demonstration at http://www.rft.com/Demo

RFT recognizes that state requirements can be confusing to navigate. “In order to provide a solution that meets both customer needs AND state requirements, we have sales engineers on staff,” says Glen Jonas, Founder and CEO of RFT. “They take responsibility for the code’s requirements for our customers because they are already working hard to provide good care to their patients. Quick Response Pro provides patient peace of mind while relieving staff and facility owners of the burden of compliance.

About RF Technologies: RFT is a turnkey manufacturer and provider of life safety solutions for the elderly, healthcare, education and hospitality markets. With more than 10,000 installations since its creation in 1987, RFT is a collaborative partner in the design of tailor-made solutions that meet the needs of each client and reduce their responsibilities. The RFT family of solutions includes CODE ALERT® call and travel management, SAFE PLACE® patient safety, HELP ALERT® staff restraint, SENSATEC® fall management products and EXACTRACK® equipment location.

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Healthcare workers in NJ nursing homes need your help!


August 17, 2021: Westfield, NJ – Marty Schwartz, JLC coordinator from New Jersey, wearing a blue mask, stands with striking healthcare workers at Complete Care nursing facility in Westfield. To his left is Brother Clauvice St. Hilaire, vice president of 1199SEIU Healthcare Workers. (Photo courtesy of Bryn Lloyd-Bollard, 1199SEIU)

Please sign our letter calling on Complete Care Management (CCM) to negotiate in good faith with the unions representing its staff in the nursing homes they recently purchased in New Jersey. Instead of honoring contracts negotiated with previous owners, CCM reduced health insurance benefits, education and retirement benefits, and paid time off. These essential workers have been on the front lines during the pandemic, putting themselves and their families at risk. They should be treated with the dignity and respect they deserve.

Workers at several Garden State facilities owned by Complete Care Management are calling on the CCM to negotiate in good faith and disclose information on how they are allocating the millions of dollars in additional Medicaid funds provided by the state due to the pandemic who have been earmarked for increased wages and benefits.

Now is the time to support them. Please sign our letter!


Healthcare facilities face challenges getting staff immunized


Courtesy / Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services

Several nursing homes have rebuffed reports that far less than 50% of their staff have been vaccinated against COVID-19.

Some data may have been incorrectly entered in an information system offered by the Medicare and Medicaid Service Centers (CMS).

However, CMS is still the best resource for finding all of this data in one place. And overall, less than 50 percent of Missouri nursing home staff have been vaccinated (47.7 percent), although only 42.8 percent of skilled Missourians have completed vaccines.

Missouri ranks 48th among states in percentage of nursing home staff who have completed vaccinations. It is 51st, if you consider the District of Columbia, Puerto Rico and Guam.

Thus, getting vaccines accepted by low-paid staff remains a challenge.

Overall, local health care facilities and the state have done a fairly good job of getting residents vaccinated. Friday, several local nursing facilities, such as River City Living Community, 3038 W. Truman Blvd. (94.6 percent) and StoneBridge Villa Marie, 1030 Edmonds St. (93.8 percent) have maintained vaccination rates above 90 percent among residents.

Heisinger Bluffs Lutheran Home, 1002 W. Main St. (85.1%); StoneBridge Adams, 1024 Adams Street (89.9); and Oak Tree Villas, a StoneBridge community, 3108 W. Truman Blvd. (88.5%) had maintained rates above 90% among residents a few days earlier.

However, with the turnover of residents, the numbers fluctuate daily.

Staff at local nursing facilities remain above the state average for vaccinations. They also experience fluctuations in completed vaccinations – similar to those that occur in residents, but in smaller increments.

For example, the Jefferson City Manor Care Center, 1720 Vieth Drive, showed that 51.2% of staff had been vaccinated earlier this week. CMS figures showed the facility was down 49.4% on Friday. StoneBridge Adams, which was 63.6% earlier in the week, climbed to 66% on Friday.

The current vaccination rate for residents of all StoneBridge facilities on Wednesday was 95.2% and 58.6% for staff, said Craig Workman, spokesperson for the nursing care provider.

“This compares favorably to the Missouri state averages for nursing homes and skilled nursing facilities,” Workman said.

The organization does not require vaccinations, but strongly encourages them for residents and staff, he continued. It provides educational materials, posters and promotional videos, and also promotes the Missouri Immunization Lottery Program.

“We bring our pharmacy vaccination clinic to each facility every four weeks to promote free on-site vaccinations and answer questions. Despite these efforts, the spread of disinformation on social media and mistrust of the government promoting the vaccine are the biggest challenges we see in getting more of it. staff members to accept vaccinations, ”Workman said.

The facilities transmit data to the federal government on a weekly basis, he said.

While the COVID-19 pandemic may have highlighted staffing issues in healthcare facilities, they existed long before the coronavirus took hold, said Steve Bollin, director of licensing and regulation at the Department of Missouri Health and Main Services.

Nursing home staff are generally a bit younger than in other health facilities. They provide day-to-day care to people who are otherwise unable to take care of themselves or who do not have the proper care at home. And, the pay may be lower than that of other jobs.

Thus, turnover can be a problem for nursing facilities.

“There is a nursing shortage that has been going on for quite some time,” Bollin said. “When COVID-19 hit, staffing was affected by two factors – nurses were drawn to agency staff, where they were paying higher salaries. occupy patients fell ill. “

There was already a shortage of Patient Care Assistants (PCAs) and Certified Practical Nurses (CNA), who work directly with patients. By having staff away for long periods of time sick or in quarantine, the facilities were really hit hard.

The financial reimbursement structure is different in long-term care facilities.

“You are meeting basic daily care needs. You are not dealing with an acute illness or injury or something that requires a higher level of care or intervention,” Bollin said. . “It really is a more continuous maintenance of health for people who are unable to take care of themselves.”

Some are in the facilities for short periods. Some for long periods. Some for the rest of their lives.

The requirements are somewhat lower for nurses than in hospitals.

“It’s hard work. The requirements are different,” he said.

Statewide, there just aren’t enough staff for everyone.

Just under 49% of Missouri nursing home staff are vaccinated, according to the CMS.

“It’s actually consistent with what we’ve seen in general when we have nursing homes or facilities that have outbreaks. We saw that it was a pretty typical experience for the staff to be around. by 50%, “Bollin said,” while residents are in the 90-95 percent range. “

His division tracks outbreaks on a daily basis (one case is considered an outbreak), he said. Virulence in healthcare facilities was not as high as it was for the first round of COVID-19, he continued.

“Although we are still seeing a pretty large number. What we are seeing – as the data shows – the largest percentage, the last time I heard over 95% of those infected with the delta variant were not vaccinated, ”says Bollin.

Outbreaks have occurred among residents and staff. Many residents have had cases of breakthrough. It’s not unique to Missouri, he said.

“We have seen that for residents who have had breakouts, they tend to have less acuteness of symptoms. They are not as sick,” he said. “We continue to monitor this very closely. We report this daily as part of our COVID-19 appeals. We keep a very close eye on how things go in nursing homes. “

The state monitors health care facilities by region, he added. However, if there is a major outbreak in a specific facility, he also keeps a close eye on it. If there is anything DHSS can do to help, they will follow up.

Institutions call DHSS if they need help, he said.

The most common conversation, said Bollin, is about how establishments can find more staff.

Gov. Mike Parson took action on Tuesday to help nursing facilities tackle the problem, when he announced $ 15 million was to be provided for support for healthcare workers.

Missouri will commit $ 15 million to provide healthcare personnel to all CMS licensed or certified critical access, acute care and long-term care hospitals. Funding will be provided on the basis of a firm and fixed endowment rate.

The whole point of the new programs is to make staff available.

“We need to understand how this can help long-term care facilities,” Bollin said. “They are the next line of care. If (patients) no longer need acute care, but cannot return home, they go to a qualified nursing or nursing home facility. long lasting – the next establishment in line until they can get home. If we can’t get people in due to staffing issues, it’s going to slow down the process. And it’s blocking things upstream, especially in the emergency department.

DHSS is well aware of the challenge.

“It’s all a mix of (conditions), especially with intensive care patients – a lot of them will have been intubated for a few days to a week,” Bollin said. “Until you find a suitable place for this person, it causes a blockage and affects healing at all levels.”


Pennsylvania wants skilled nursing facilities to vaccinate 80% of staff by October


The Pennsylvania Department of Health has set a new vaccination target for skilled nursing facilities. These establishments are urged to have at least 80% of staff members vaccinated against COVID-19 by October 1, officials said Thursday. “Currently in Pennsylvania, only 12.5% ​​of facilities have an immunization rate of 80% or more. It is embarrassing and, frankly, very frightening for residents and their families,” said the deputy executive secretary of the Department of Health, Keara Klinepeter. Officials have said Nursing homes that fail to meet 80% expectations by the deadline will have to undergo more frequent testing. The tests would be the responsibility of the establishment. Appropriate regulatory action will be taken if establishments fail to comply with testing requirements, officials said. the federal government. The dashboard is available at www.health.pa.gov.

The Pennsylvania Department of Health has set a new vaccination target for skilled nursing facilities.

These establishments are being asked to vaccinate at least 80% of staff against COVID-19 by October 1, officials said on Thursday.

“Currently in Pennsylvania, only 12.5% ​​of facilities have an immunization rate of 80% or more. It is embarrassing and, frankly, very frightening for residents and their families,” said the deputy executive secretary of the Department of Health, Keara Klinepeter.

Officials said nursing homes that fail to meet 80% expectations by the deadline will need to undergo more frequent testing. The tests would be the responsibility of the establishment.

Appropriate regulatory action will be taken if facilities fail to meet testing requirements, officials said.

The Department of Health also announced a new Vaccine Dashboard for Qualified Nursing Facilities with self-reported immunization data that is submitted weekly to the federal government. The dashboard is available on www.health.pa.gov.


Student Loan Consolidation Vs. Refinancing

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  • You can only consolidate federal loans; private student loans are not eligible for the program.
  • Refinancing student loans can earn you a lower rate than the original terms of your loan.
  • When you refinance federal loans with a private lender, you lose some critical protections for borrowers.
  • Learn more about Insider’s student loan coverage here.

The difference between loan consolidation and refinance can be confusing, especially because people sometimes use the terms interchangeably. However, they are two different processes, and depending on your financial goals, one may be better for you than the other.

What is student loan consolidation?

You can consolidate or combine multiple federal loans into one loan with a direct consolidation loan. There are no fees to consolidate your federal loans. If a private company offers to help you apply and charges a fee, that’s a red flag. Student loan consolidation does not require a credit check.

Keep in mind that you won’t save money by consolidating your student loans, but that doesn’t mean you can’t benefit from the process. You will have fewer payments to follow each month and if you are not satisfied with your loan servicer, you will receive a new one when consolidating.

If you consolidate loans other than direct loans, you may become eligible for income-based repayment plans and civil service loan forgiveness. If you already have direct loans, you can retain these benefits when consolidating.

If you have variable rate federal loans (which were last disbursed in 2006), consolidating will allow you to convert them to fixed rate loans. You can also reduce your monthly payments by opting for a longer repayment term, although this option will cost more in interest overall.

However, when you consolidate your loans, any unpaid interest becomes part of the principal balance of your new loan. This means that interest can accrue on a larger principal balance than if you hadn’t consolidated.

What is student loan refinancing?

If you’re looking for a lower rate on your student loans, you’ll want to refinance them. Depending on your current financial profile, private lenders may offer you better terms than your original loan. Refinancing a student loan will require a credit check, and your rates will be based on that.

You can switch from a fixed rate loan to a variable rate loan when you refinance, which may allow you to obtain a lower rate. However, as the name suggests, variable rate loans can fluctuate and you could end up paying a higher rate down the line than if you had stuck with a fixed rate loan.

Exercise caution before refinancing federal student loans. You will waive all current and future borrower protections from the government, such as COVID-19 related loan forbearance, currently in place until January 31, 2022, and federal student loan relief programs such as the forgiveness of public service loans.

You will also not be eligible for specific repayment options such as income-contingent repayment plans, which take into account your specific income and family size when determining monthly payments and protect you in the event of a Job Loss. Your interest savings might not be worth losing these benefits.

On the other hand, if you are refinancing private student loans, there is almost no downside. There are usually no refinance fees, and you may be able to get better rates on your new loan, especially if your credit score has improved since you got your original loan.

When deciding between refinancing or consolidating your loans, make sure you know the ins and outs of both processes and decide which is best for you.

Visiting rules take effect for hospitals and qualified nursing facilities in California


A statewide order that will limit visitors to hospitals and control the spread of COVID-19 will take effect at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday. actually impact every department in the hospital, ”said Steven Salyer, CEO of Watsonville Community Hospital. If you take someone to the emergency room, you will have to wait in the car. Only one visitor per patient will be allowed in outpatient departments, but there will be some exceptions. “We try to limit all services to a single visitor, if possible, however, we allow 2 for patients in labor and delivery. There is an exception for ‘end of life’ patients. We will work with this family. in those scenarios, ”Salyer said. The policy changes come from the California Department of Public Health. Some of the visitors we spoke with think it’s a good plan to keep everyone safe from COVID-19. “I think that’s good. I don’t think you know who is coming in and affecting other people and it’s not fair to the staff who take care of you,” said Julie Carrera, resident of Corralitos. The order also requires masks, personal protective equipment, and physical distancing requirements. “So when you go through security and go through the main entrance and emergency department, we take your name and we are recording that you have been through the facility, “Salyer said. Visits to COVID-19 patients will remain prohibited until they recover. You can also contact your own hospital to determine what their visiting rules are for the public.

A statewide order that will limit visitors to the hospital and control the spread of COVID-19 will take effect at 12:01 a.m. on Wednesday.

The order requires visitors to the hospital to prove vaccination or that a negative COVID-19 test be taken within the past 72 hours.

“It will actually impact every department in the hospital,” said Steven Salyer, CEO of Watsonville Community Hospital.

If you take someone to the emergency room, you will have to wait in the car. Only one visitor per patient will be allowed in outpatient departments but there will be some exceptions.

“We try to limit all services to a single visitor, if possible, however, we allow 2 for patients in labor and delivery. There is an exception for patients at ‘end of life’. We will work with this family in these scenarios. ”Salyer said.

The policy changes come from the California Department of Public Health.

Some of the visitors we spoke with think it’s a good plan to keep everyone safe from COVID-19.

“I think that’s good. I don’t think you know who comes in and affects other people and it’s not fair to the staff taking care of you,” said Julie Carrera, resident of Corralitos.

The order also requires masks, personal protective equipment and physical distancing requirements.

Hospitals will keep an eye on everyone who walks through its doors.

“So when you go through security and go through the main entrance and emergency department, we take your name and record that you’ve walked through the facility,” Sayer said.

Visits to COVID-19 patients will remain prohibited until their recovery.

You can also contact your own hospital to find out what their visiting rules are for the public.


Fisetin for COVID ‐ 19 in Skilled Nursing Facilities: Senolytic Testing in the Age of COVID – Verdoorn – – Journal of the American Geriatrics Society


General geroscience

The Geroscience hypothesis postulates that the biological factors of aging, including cellular senescence, are at the origin of several disorders and chronic diseases.13 Senescent cell (SnC) load is low in young, healthy individuals, but increases with aging in many tissues. SnCs also appear at the pathogenic sites of many diseases, including the lungs in COPD, asthma, smoking, and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis; fatty and other tissues in obesity / diabetes; heart and vessels in cardiovascular disease; brain in Alzheimer’s disease; around cancers; bone in osteoporosis; bone and synovium in osteoarthritis; kidney in kidney disease; and the liver in cirrhosis and steatosis.

Cellular senescence is cell fate, such as differentiation, proliferation, apoptosis, or necrosis. SnCs are in essentially irreversible replicative arrest, while remaining viable and metabolically active. External and internal signals, including genotoxic, metabolic and mechanical / shear stresses can lead to senescence through cascades of transcription factors (eg, p16ENCRE4A/ retinoblastoma protein and / or p53 / p21CIP1). This causes significant changes in gene expression and organelle function (eg, mitochondria, lysosomes), profound morphological and metabolic changes, and resistance to apoptosis. SnCs often develop a secretory phenotype associated with senescence (SASP). This can include pro-inflammatory; pro-apoptotic cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1α, IL-6, etc.); chemokines which attract, activate and anchor immune cells (IP-10, MCP, etc.); tissue destructive proteases (eg, MMP-3, 9 or 12); prothrombotic factors (PAI-1, etc.); factors that impair stem / progenitor cell function and cause fibrosis (eg, activin-A, TGF-β-bound proteins); and ferritin. In addition to proteins and peptides, SASP can include bioactive lipids (eg, fibrosis, systemic inflammation, immune dysfunction, and the spread of senescence (Figure 1).14, 15

Mechanism of action of fisetin

The health impact of SnCs has led to the research and discovery of senolytics, drugs that selectively remove SnCs. Short-acting senolytics are effective even when administered intermittently, once every few days or weeks in a “hit-and-run” approach, potentially reducing side effects. Brief disruption of survival pathways is sufficient to kill SnCs in human cell cultures, in vivo in mice, and in human tissue explants containing SnC. After drug-induced depletion, SnCs take more than a week to re-accumulate if the inducers remain present, at least in vitro. Monthly senolytic administration is as effective as daily doses in relieving certain age-related diseases, for example osteoporosis in mice. These points, along with the satisfaction of a modified set of Koch’s postulates, indicate that senolytics alleviate dysfunction by clearing SnCs, and not by other off-target mechanisms that require continued occupation of a receptor or l engagement of an enzyme. Senolytics relieve multiple conditions in mice, including pulmonary fibrosis, heart failure, vascular dysfunction, dementia, diabetes and its complications; fragility, damage / dysfunction of kidneys, liver and intestines; osteoporosis; osteoarthritis; delay cancer; and extend the lifespan and median lifespan.

Rationale for using geroscientific interventions to treat COVID-19 infection and its sequelae

SARS-CoV-2 can cause hyperinflammation, cytokine storm, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), myocarditis, generalized thrombosis, persistent symptoms and morbidity (long-haul syndrome) and multiple organ failure , especially in the elderly or chronically ill. Morbidity and mortality from SARS-CoV-2 is strongly associated with age and is also increased in younger people with chronic diseases, including obesity, diabetes, chronic lung disease, smoking, asthma, atherosclerosis, hypertension and immunological, hepatic and renal diseases.16 Consistent with the Geroscience hypothesis, the elderly and patients with diseases associated with senescence are more susceptible to adverse reactions in response to infections (eg, SARS-CoV-2) and frequently develop a more exaggerated inflammatory state than young patients without pre-existing senescence – associated chronic diseases. This has usually been attributed to a dysfunction of the immune system or chronic inflammation. Our “enhancer / rheostat” hypothesis is that pathogen-associated molecular configuring factors (PAMPs), such as viral antigens, cause a change in SASP from pre-existing SnCs to a more inflammatory, pro-apoptotic and profibrotic SASP,17 potentially exacerbating systemic inflammatory responses and also amplifying the spread of senescence to other cells. The resulting additional SnCs can exacerbate and prolong inflammation, attenuate or delay recovery, lead to persistent frailty, cause long-term tissue fibrosis, and contribute to long-haul syndrome, multiple organ failure and death. .

Agents that target fundamental mechanisms of aging, such as senolytics, have the potential to improve resilience and prevent, delay or reduce morbidity and mortality from infections such as SARS-CoV-2.14, 15, 18, 19 Senolytic fisetin (3,3 ′, 4 ′, 7-tetrahydroxyflavone, a flavonoid found in many fruits and vegetables and available as a dietary supplement) alleviates multiple disorders associated with senescence in mice, physical dysfunction in mice. elderly mouse and age-related disorders. tissue dysfunction and pathology.20 Studies in a mouse model indicate that Fisetin improves the antibody response and improves clinical outcomes (including mortality) in aged mice that are exposed to infected viruses containing a murine -coronavirus, just like another senolytic regimen, Dasatinib plus Quercetin (D + Q).17 Although ongoing clinical trials of these agents (Table S1) have revealed few or no serious side effects directly related to senolytic drugs, it is still unclear whether senolytics will be safe and effective for older people with SARS. CoV-2 and they should not be used outside of a carefully supervised clinical trial. Given the high morbidity and mortality resulting from SARS-CoV-2 in the elderly and chronically ill patients, a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial of Fisetin for SNF residents who have a positive rtPCR test for SARS-CoV-2 seems important.


Nursing facilities resolve denial of admission complaint | Local News


DANVERS – The parent company of nine nursing homes in Massachusetts and Rhode Island – including Hathorne Hill in Danvers, Sutton Hill Center in North Andover and Academy Manor in Andover – has reached a deal with federal prosecutors to resolve the allegations according to which houses have reportedly refused to admit patients who were being treated for opioid dependence.

In the “Voluntary Resolution Agreement,” released by the U.S. Attorney’s Office and Department of Health and Human Services, Pennsylvania-based Genesis HealthCare admits no wrongdoing, but agreed to a series of measures to bring facilities into compliance with Americans with disabilities. Law, Rehabilitation Law and Affordable Care Law.

Federal prosecutors in Massachusetts and Rhode Island began investigating after receiving complaints that patients receiving methadone or buprenorphine (Suboxone) treatment were being denied admission to Genesis facilities.

Both drugs are among those used for what is now known as drug treatment for opioid use disorders. Opioid use disorder is considered a disability under federal law.

Patients were seeking admission for treatment of other conditions.

The settlement imposed a penalty of $ 60,000, of which Genesis will have to pay $ 10,000 within 30 days. The balance will be suspended and then canceled as long as Genesis complies with the remaining requirements, including the revision or adoption of new admission, discrimination and training policies and practices to bring them into compliance with federal requirements.

“The ADA is the law of the land, and the ADA makes it illegal to discriminate against people with disabilities, including opioid use disorders,” Acting US Attorney Nathaniel R. Mendell said in a statement. press release announcing the settlement.

Genesis is the fourth qualified nursing facility operator in Massachusetts to resolve allegations of denial of admission to patients receiving opioid treatment.

In a statement, Lori Mayer, spokesperson for Genesis, said the company “entered into a voluntary resolution” to “avoid litigation costs.”

“There has been no admission of wrongdoing by the centers, and the government has provided no clinical or other information to support the allegations,” Mayer said in the statement.

“To avoid litigation costs, however, the centers have nonetheless agreed to clarify their admission policies to ensure full compliance with the ADA with respect to drug-assisted treatment for disorders associated with the use of opioids, “the statement read. “The updated policy confirms that admission decisions must ensure the safety of all residents in accordance with ADA law, in accordance with Genesis policy.”

In the agreement, the company does not admit any wrongdoing and denies any knowledge of the alleged practice of refusing certain patients because of their opioid treatment.

“The designated Genesis facilities do not admit the claims made by the United States in this document and are not aware of the clinical or other circumstances of their alleged denials of admission in the referenced compliance exams,” the OK. “Nonetheless, the (facilities) have agreed to clarify or revise (…) the admission policies to ensure full compliance with the ADA.”

In December, the Justice Department struck a deal with Massachusetts-based Alliance Health and Human Services, which operates eight facilities, including nursing homes in Peabody and Marblehead, to settle similar allegations. Two other companies, Athena Health Care Systems, which operates Oxford Rehabilitation and Healthcare in Haverhill, and Charlwell House, which operates on the South Shore, have also already settled similar complaints.

Court reporter Julie Manganis can be reached at 978-338-2521, by email at jmanganis@salemnews.com or on Twitter at @SNJulieManganis.

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Residents of Middletown Health Center, families are “together again”



MIDDLETOWN – Wadsworth Glen Healthcare and Rehabilitation Center hosted a holiday celebration this month so residents’ families can reunite at a late party that was canceled in December due to the pandemic.

Dubbed “Christmas in July,” the July 29 event marked more than a year of separation made necessary by the COVID-19 epidemic, according to a press release.

The event kicked off with residents of Wadsworth Glen and their families singing Christmas carols, led by Recreation Director Lauren Agnelli, after which guests enjoyed activities including a visit from Santa, cookie decorating, as well as Christmas trivia and bingo.


The event was part of a series of ‘Together Again’ events organized by Athena Health Care Systems, which operates nursing homes across the region.

“This past year has been a challenge for our residents and their families, and that is why we are creating these special moments where loved ones can safely spend time together in our centers,” said Larry Santilli , President and CEO of Athena. in a prepared statement.


Fauci joins calls to demand COVID-19 vaccines for healthcare workers


Dr Anthony Fauci said on Sunday he fully supports the requirement for COVID-19 vaccines for healthcare workers, joining a list of medical officials calling for the idea amid reports some in the medical community were refusing get vaccinated against the virus.

In an interview with Chuck Todd on “Meet the Press,” the nation’s leading infectious disease expert said it was “inexplicable” that some health workers, including many patients, decided not to go. get vaccinated against the disease that has killed more than 600,000 Americans.

“You are a health care worker,” Fauci said. “Your profession, the thing that you have devoted your life to, is to protect people, to heal them, to protect them from disease.”

The president’s chief medical adviser told Todd it’s not a new idea to require healthcare workers to get vaccinated to work in the field.

“I see patients at [National Institute of Health] clinical center. If I don’t get [the] vaccine against influenza or against hepatitis, I am not allowed to see patients. So it’s not something brand new with COVID, ”Fauci said.

“So I’m very much in favor of the obligation, if you want to see patients and participate in health care, you have to get vaccinated. Period.”

Support for vaccination mandates comes amid a disastrous spread of the highly transmissible delta variant of COVID-19 that has had a severe impact among the unvaccinated. As long as there are so many unvaccinated people, the virus will continue to mutate, prolonging the pandemic and threatening people’s lives. Vaccines protect a person from serious illnesses caused by COVID-19 and help reduce the spread of the virus.

Last month, nearly 60 major medical organizations signed a letter urging healthcare and long-term care employers to demand that employees get vaccinated against COVID-19. The letter included the American Medical Association, the American Academy of Pediatrics, and the American College of Physicians, among others.

“With over 300 million doses administered in the United States and nearly 4 billion doses administered worldwide, we know that vaccines are safe and highly effective in preventing serious illness and death from COVID-19,” said Dr Susan Bailey, from WADA’s immediate past. president, said in a statement.

“Increasing vaccinations among healthcare workers will not only reduce the spread of COVID-19, but will also reduce the harmful toll of this virus among healthcare workers and those we strive to serve. “

According to an AMA survey, vaccinations for doctors are 95% almost universal, although this does not apply to other workers in healthcare facilities. Recent Medicare figures show that only about 60% of nursing home staff are vaccinated, compared to about 80% of residents.


MARK FELIX / AFP via Getty Images

Vaccine protesters pray outside the Houston Methodist Hospital in Houston, Texas on June 26, 2021. More than 150 hospital staff have been fired or resigned after a judge dismissed their lawsuit concerning the institution’s vaccination mandate.

Although no federal law prevents employers from requiring vaccinations, the issue of protecting yourself and your community from the plague has been politicized in a country where approaches to public health are divided and the consumption of disinformation is high.

More than half of unvaccinated Americans mistakenly believe the COVID-19 vaccine is more dangerous than the virus, according to a poll released Aug. 4 by the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation’s Vaccine Monitor Project.

The available vaccines, which are slated to move from emergency use authorization to full Food and Drug Administration approval soon, build on decades of research that began long before COVID-19 hit the world. ‘last year. Officials like Fauci hope the FDA approval will allow more entities to mandate vaccines, even though the injections have already been shown to work and are safe, as scientists have said.

On the same day as the July 26 letter, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs became the first major federal agency to require its more than 100,000 health care workers to be vaccinated against COVID-19. It is not known what would happen to VA employees who refuse the vaccine, although workers have eight weeks from the announcement to get the vaccine.

California Governor Gavin Newsom (R) also announced on July 26 that healthcare workers will need to show proof of COVID-19 vaccination or undergo weekly tests. The mandate also applies to government employees who work in high-risk “collective establishments”, which include residential establishments for adults and the elderly.

“We are now facing an unvaccinated pandemic, and it will take increased efforts to protect Californians from the dangerous Delta variant,” Newsom said of the warrant, which impacts an estimated 2 million officers from health in the public and private health sectors of California. .

On August 5, a major senior care chain announced that it now requires all employees and salespeople to be vaccinated to keep their jobs. Pennsylvania-based Genesis HealthCare, which has 70,000 employees and approximately 400 nursing homes and senior communities, said 85% of residents and 65% of staff had voluntarily received the vaccine.

And just days ago, President Joe Biden announced that his administration is demanding that all federal workers get vaccinated or undergo minimum weekly tests in addition to other public safety measures. Biden did not signal he would impose a national vaccine mandate.